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Ok, First off, I am not a mysql guru. Second, I did search, but saw nothing relevant related to mysql, and since my DB knowledge is limited, guessing syntactical differences between two different Database types just isn't in the cards.

I am trying to determine if a particular value already exists in a table before inserting a row. I've decided to go about this using two Stored procedures. The first:

CREATE PROCEDURE `nExists` ( n VARCHAR(255) ) BEGIN
    SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT * FROM Users WHERE username=n) as T;
END

And The Second:

CREATE PROCEDURE `createUser` ( n VARCHAR(255) ) BEGIN
    IF (nExists(n) = 0) THEN
        INSERT INTO Users...
    END IF;
END

So, as you can see, I'm attempting to call nExists from createUser. I get the error that no Function exists with the name nExists...because it's a stored procedure. I'm not clear on what the difference is, or why such a difference would be necessary, but I'm a Java dev, so maybe I'm missing some grand DB-related concept here.

Could you guys help me out by any chance? Thanks

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3  
why SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT * FROM Users WHERE username=n) and not just SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Users WHERE username=n? –  zerkms Jan 26 '12 at 19:31
    
@zerkms err...idk. I think I see what you are getting at. I'll try that. –  Cody S Jan 26 '12 at 19:35
    
@zerkms Yep, Worked great! Set that comment as an Answer and I'll give you the big green checkmark of happiness :) –  Cody S Jan 26 '12 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not sure how it helped you, but...

why SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT * FROM Users WHERE username=n) and not just SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Users WHERE username=n?

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Just make the user name (or whatever the primary application index is) a UNIQUE index and then there is no need to test: Just try to insert a new record. If it already exists, handle the error. If it succeeds, all is well.

It can (and should) all be one stored procedure.

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