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I just got bit by assuming the following:

foreach ($arr as $key => $value) {
  switch($key) {
    // ... some other cases
    default:
      continue;
      // ^== assumption: move on to the next iteration of the foreach
      //     actual PHP: treat this continue just like a break
  }
  // ...
}

But in fact, according to the documentation for continue:

the switch statement is considered a looping structure for the purposes of continue.

Is there a reason for this choice on the part of PHP language designers? As far as I can tell, switch isn't a looping control structure, so why treat it like one in this case?

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15  
One should avoid the use of words "reason" and "design" when talking about php ;) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Jan 26 '12 at 19:48
6  
you can use continue 2 =) –  cweinberger Jan 26 '12 at 19:49
3  
@drrcknlsn, switch would need to be consistent because it uses break, which jumps out of the active block. This is all speculation on my part, btw. –  zzzzBov Jan 26 '12 at 20:04
3  
@zzzzBov we're talking about continue, which is used in looping structures to skip to the next iteration. It should ignore switch. break is OK in both, and should break out of the block or loop. Treating switch as a looping structure essentially makes continue synonymous to break in this use case. –  chesles Jan 26 '12 at 20:07
1  
@chesles, if you use continue on a block, it jumps out of the active block and continues on to the next iteration of that block. I can visualize switch as being a looping structure with exactly one iteration, which would make continue behave identically to break, finishing the loop and moving out of the block. I'm not defending the design of the language, I'm simply speculating on the pattern that I see. –  zzzzBov Jan 26 '12 at 22:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you won't find any real "reason" for this behavior.

The only real motivation behind this behavior was probably that implementing switch as if it were a looping structure allows PHP to reuse existing break and continue semantics of loops instead of reimplementing a special version for switch.

Or to phrase it more positively: It's for consistency.

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so, "they were lazy"? Makes sense, I guess :P –  chesles Jan 26 '12 at 20:43
    
The switch expression is evaluated for each case (case, default) until the loop is finished (end of the code-block or until break, continue or return is given). –  hakre Jan 27 '12 at 14:51
    
@hakre not true. "In a switch statement, the condition is evaluated only once and the result is compared to each case statement" - php.net/manual/en/control-structures.switch.php –  chesles Jan 27 '12 at 16:07
    
I'm not sure about consistency, since it's inconsistent with, for example, switch/continue in C. However, after mucking around a little in the PHP sources, it does appear to be for simplicity in implementing continue. Since it is very closely related to break, which pays attention to switch blocks, continue also pays attention to them. –  chesles Jan 30 '12 at 18:20

The best explanation I can think of is that PHP considers it a looping structure so it fits the model of something that uses continue and break. The switch documentation doesn't shed much further light on it other than

Note that unlike some other languages, the continue statement applies to switch and acts similar to break. If you have a switch inside a loop and wish to continue to the next iteration of the outer loop, use continue 2.

So perhaps it is because, like a loop, it stops the execution of the rest of the code in its structure.

However, when you use a number of levels, these two behave quite differently:

continue without a level

<?php
for($i=0;$i<5;$i++) {
    switch($i) {
        case 2:
            continue;
        default:
            echo $i, "\n";
    }
    echo "Finished with {$i}\n";
}
//0
//Finished with 0
//1
//Finished with 1
//Finished with 2
//3
//Finished with 3
//4
//Finished with 4

continue with a level

<?php
for($i=0;$i<5;$i++) {
    switch($i) {
        case 2:
            continue 2;
        default:
            echo $i, "\n";
    }
    echo "Finished with {$i}\n";
}
//0
//Finished with 0
//1
//Finished with 1
//3
//Finished with 3
//4
//Finished with 4

break without a level

<?php
for($i=0;$i<5;$i++) {
    switch($i) {
        case 2:
            break;
        default:
            echo $i, "\n";
    }
    echo "Finished with {$i}\n";
}
//0
//Finished with 0
//1
//Finished with 1
//Finished with 2
//3
//Finished with 3
//4
//Finished with 4

break with a level

<?php
for($i=0;$i<5;$i++) {
    switch($i) {
        case 2:
            break 2;
        default:
            echo $i, "\n";
    }
    echo "Finished with {$i}\n";
}
//0
//Finished with 0
//1
//Finished with 1
share|improve this answer

As far as I can tell, switch isn't a looping control structure, so why treat it like one in this case?

Does one iteration not qualify as a loop? Same applies to while inside a foreach for example that only iterates once:

foreach (range(1,2) as $value)
{
    $i = 0;
    while (!$i++)
    {
       continue;
    }
    echo $value, "\n";
}

It does echo the values as well instead of continue the foreach loop; It is related to while.

If your expectation is that switch is like if (which it isn't), then you might not expect that behaviour of continue, however I'm pretty sure for while you expect it.

But if you really think that if is like switch, then how could break work differently than continue?

So I won't say it's that much out of order, it's just that switch is a control structure having the clothes of a loop. And as we normally use break (which you expect to work), the behaviour of continue is not that well known. And that's all. Or why would you expect continue to not work like break in a switch?

So the reason might be to have break and continue aligned.

share|improve this answer
    
My expectation is that switch is like a string of if/else if, which it is, unless I'm mistaken. Some languages that don't have switch (e.g. python) even say "use if/elif instead of switch". So how is switch not like an if in PHP? –  chesles Jan 27 '12 at 15:57
    
"The switch statement is similar to a series of IF statements on the same expression." - php.net/manual/en/control-structures.switch.php –  chesles Jan 27 '12 at 16:22
    
@chesles: Okay cool, that's what I assumed (having switch in the head as if if) - so the analogy is break and continue then. Do you expect them to work same as well (same like if and switch for break and continue)? –  hakre Jan 27 '12 at 16:39
    
See my question, in which I describe the behavior I expect. Essentially I expect continue to continue the next iteration of the nearest loop, and I don't expect switch to be a loop, because it isn't, although PHP treats it like one for some reason. That reason is what I'm after here. –  chesles Jan 27 '12 at 17:52
    
So what about break? What do you expect about break in switch? To break the nearest loop and you don't expect switch to be that loop, right? Keep in mind that any loop is a control structure as well. –  hakre Jan 28 '12 at 11:58

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