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Based on std::transform

template < class InputIterator, class OutputIterator, class UnaryOperator >
  OutputIterator transform ( InputIterator first1, InputIterator last1,
                             OutputIterator result, UnaryOperator op );

Can op be a member function? If so, how do I call it?

share|improve this question
    
See Boost.Bind. – ildjarn Jan 26 '12 at 19:58
    
    
You question is slightly ambiguous. What class are you hoping to make op a member of? The class of *first1, the class of *result, the class of *this, or some other class? – Robᵩ Jan 26 '12 at 20:22
    
@Rob, it is best if I know both cases. – q0987 Jan 26 '12 at 20:32
    
@q0987 - see my answer. It describes the case of op being a member of the class of *first1 and the case of op being a member of *this. You should be able to generalize from there. – Robᵩ Jan 26 '12 at 20:33

No (well, not directly). You need to use an adaptor, either old std::mem_fun (together with bind1st, IIRC) or std::bind/boost::bind.

std::transform(
    xs.begin(), xs.end(), ys.begin(),
    std::bind(&Class::member, &class_instance)
);
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't class_instance supposed to be supplied by std::transform? So std::mem_fun by itself would probably be more appropriate than bind1st. – Ben Voigt Jan 26 '12 at 20:18
    
Replace &class_instance with std::placeholders::_1. – Xeo Jan 26 '12 at 20:19
    
@Ben: mem_fn is the appropriate Boost/C++11 version. – Xeo Jan 26 '12 at 20:22
    
@BenVoigt: No idea, OP can be about either, really. – Cat Plus Plus Jan 26 '12 at 20:27
1  
IIRC C++11 deprecated std::mem_fun(). – wilhelmtell Jan 27 '12 at 19:06

It is pretty easy to do if you wrap the call in lambda:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

class C {
public:
  int op() const { return 1; }
};

class D {
  int op() { return 1; }
  void f() {
    std::vector<C> xs;
    std::vector<int> ys;
    std::transform(xs.begin(), xs.end(), ys.begin(),
      [](const C& x) { return x.op(); });
    std::transform(xs.begin(), xs.end(), ys.begin(),
      [this](const C& x) { return this->op(); });
  }
};
share|improve this answer

You need a helper object, like std::less but for a unary operator.

C++11 lambdas make this incredibly easy:

std::transform(xs.begin(), xs.end(), ys.begin(), [](the_type x){ return -x; });
std::transform(xs.begin(), xs.end(), ys.begin(), [](the_type x){ return !x; });
std::transform(xs.begin(), xs.end(), ys.begin(), [](the_type x){ return ~x; });

Or, use these flexible helpers:

struct negate
{
    template<typename T>
    auto operator()(const T& x) const -> decltype(-x) { return -x; }
};

struct invert
{
    template<typename T>
    auto operator()(const T& x) const -> decltype(!x) { return !x; }
};

struct complement
{
    template<typename T>
    auto operator()(const T& x) const -> decltype(~x) { return ~x; }
};

std::transform(xs.begin(), xs.end(), ys.begin(), negate());
std::transform(xs.begin(), xs.end(), ys.begin(), invert());
std::transform(xs.begin(), xs.end(), ys.begin(), complement());
share|improve this answer
    
lambda – q0987 Jan 30 '12 at 3:12
    
@q0987: I showed examples of lambdas. Was something wrong with them? – Ben Voigt Jan 30 '12 at 3:34

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