Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

List all the files in /usr/bin whose filenames contain lowercase English alphabet characters only and also contain the word file as a (contiguous) substring.

For example, file and profiles are such files, but git-ls-files is not.

This is the exact question I have and I can only use grep, ls, cat and wc for it.

ls /usr/bin/ | grep '[^-]*file'

This is what I got so far and output is below. I dont know how to display for example just file since * is zero or more occurences. And no idea how to put lowercase thing in the regex as well..

check-binary-files
clean-binary-files
desktop-file-install
desktop-file-validate
ecryptfs-rewrite-file
file
filep
git-cat-file
git-diff-files
git-ls-files
git-merge-file
git-merge-one-file
git-unpack-file
lockfile
nsrfile
pamfile
pcprofiledump
pnmfile
ppufiles
profiles
share|improve this question
    
Why down vote? OP has listed it as homework, have stated the requirements given expected result and shown what he has tried. –  jaypal singh Jan 26 '12 at 21:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
ls /usr/bin/ | grep --regex '^[[:lower:]]*file[[:lower:]]*$'

The ^ and $ match the beginning and end of the string, respectively.

share|improve this answer

Using ls piped with grep is really redundant in that situation. You can use find:

$> find /usr/bin -regex "/usr/bin/[a-z]*file[a-z]*" -type f -printf "%f\n"
profiles
keditfiletype
inifile
dotlockfile
pamfile
pnmfile
file
konsoleprofile
share|improve this answer
    
The question says "I can only use grep ls cat wc," but this is definitely the way to go if those constraints are not present. –  nmichaels Jan 26 '12 at 20:56
ls -1 /usr/bin | grep '^[a-z]*file[a-z]*$'

ls -1 makes sure the files are listed each in a single line. ^ and $ are symbols for start and end of line, which is what you were missing (otherwise it can match a substring of the filename)

share|improve this answer

Use -P option, means Perl regular expressions, so finally your command would look like:

ls /usr/bin | grep -P '[a-z]file'

insider@gfl ~/test/bin$ ls
123file             desktop-file-install   file          git-diff-files  git-merge-one-file  nsrfile        pnmfile   testlist
check-binary-files  desktop-file-validate  filep         git-ls-files    git-unpack-file     pamfile        ppufiles
clean-binary-files  ecryptfs-rewrite-file  git-cat-file  git-merge-file  lockfile            pcprofiledump  profiles
insider@gfl ~/test/bin$ ls . | grep -P '[a-z]file'
lockfile
nsrfile
pamfile
pcprofiledump
pnmfile
ppufiles
profiles
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.