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I code plugins for the popular Bukkit API for Minecraft.

Basically, at this point, my coding is just one class with a ton of methods and public variables. How can I neatly organize this code into classes?

In coding terms, how would I go about doing this? Would I import each class?

I noticed when accessing variables from another class, I have to do: ClassName.variable every time, and that's a bit of a drag. Is there a way around this?

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Program to interfaces. No, really. Then make each interface say what it does -- it should do ONE thing -- and then compose the interfaces into concrete types (classes). Just getting down the separation into a documented interface goes a good way to showing HOW it can be divided. I swear sub-typing exists in Java only as a means of "implementation sharing" :( –  user166390 Jan 26 '12 at 21:46
    
If you even have to ask this, I don't think you understood what OOP means: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming –  Lukas Knuth Jan 26 '12 at 21:47

3 Answers 3

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I'm no fan of Java, but this problem isn't about being a Java n00b. It's about being new to object-oriented design (you'd run into this problem with large programs in any language if you organize them well).

You'll generally want to follow the "Single Responsibility Principle". In a nutshell, it means that your classes should probably be smaller than they are now, and that each of them should be in charge of handling a small enough task that it's easy to tell whether it's correct. This is easier said than done, but that's why programming is hard: organizing your ideas is hard.

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Alright, now how would I implement this in say: Eclipse –  Gray Adams Jan 26 '12 at 21:51
    
Same way you'd implement it in Notepad. But more seriously, Eclipse has tools for adding new classes and I believe it has refactoring stuff. I'm afraid you'll have to figure that stuff out for yourself. The basic idea is to figure out where each class is managing 2+ things that could be reasonably managed by separate classes, and then separating them. –  Steve Howard Jan 26 '12 at 21:53

Break the code down into classes, each of which contains related data and methods that describe the behaviour of that data. There will usually be lots of alternative designs; it's a matter of experience. Try to create classes that make sense in your domain, i.e. that are modelling real-world things (this isn't always possible or sensible, just a rule of thumb).

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In coding terms, how would I go about doing this?

Identify which methods implement functionality which belongs together. And refactor them into classes.

Would I import each class?

Your IDE (eclipse or whatever) will do the imports for you.

I noticed when accessing variables from another class, I have to do: ClassName.variable every time, and that's a bit of a drag. Is there a way around this?

First you wrote ClassName instead of instance, (This implies static) In Java you have the option to do a static import

import static java.lang.Math.*;

after that you could use the symbols in more natural way like:

double r = cos(PI);

instead of

double r = Math.cos(Math.PI);

But to be honest, I wouldn't recommend this in general.

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