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I'm confused. After stumbling upon this thread, I tried to figure out how to format a countdown timer that had the format hh:mm:ss.

Here's my attempt -

//hh:mm:ss
String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d", 
    TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis),
    TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis) - 
    TimeUnit.MINUTES.toMinutes(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis)),
    TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(millis) - 
    TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis)));   

So, when I try a value like 3600000ms, I get 01:59:00, which is wrong since it should be 01:00:00. Obviously there's something wrong with my logic, but at the moment, I cannot see what it is!

Can anyone help?

Edit -

Fixed it. Here's the right way to format milliseconds to hh:mm:ss format -

//hh:mm:ss
String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d", 
    TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis),
    TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis) - 
    TimeUnit.HOURS.toMinutes(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis)),
    TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(millis) - 
    TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis))));

The problem was this TimeUnit.MINUTES.toMinutes(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis)). It should have been this TimeUnit.HOURS.toMinutes(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis)) instead.

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1  
3,600,000 milliseconds is 3,600 seconds, or 60 minutes, or 1 hour. It shouldn't be 00:59:59, it should be 01:00:00. –  Borealid Jan 27 '12 at 0:05

8 Answers 8

up vote 62 down vote accepted

You were really close:

String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d", 
TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis),
TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis) -  
TimeUnit.HOURS.toMinutes(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis)), // The change is in this line
TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(millis) - 
TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis)));   

You were converting hours to millisseconds using minutes instead of hours.

BTW, I like your use of the TimeUnit API :)

Here's some test code:

public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException {
    long millis = 3600000;
    String hms = String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d", TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis),
            TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis) - TimeUnit.HOURS.toMinutes(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis)),
            TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(millis) - TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis)));
    System.out.println(hms);
}

Output:

01:00:00

I realised that my code above can be greatly simplified by using a modulus division instead of subtraction:

String hms = String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d", TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis),
    TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis) % TimeUnit.HOURS.toMinutes(1),
    TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(millis) % TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(1));

Still using the TimeUnit API for all magic values, and gives exactly the same output.

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Amen, like the way you use TimeUnit API :) –  Dheeraj Bhaskar Jan 12 '13 at 13:27
    
It is not a good idea to reinvent the wheel! Triton Man's answer is better solution. –  محمدباقر Jul 10 '13 at 6:10
2  
@محمدباقر But the other answer uses an external library, whereas my code uses the core JDK only. It depends on what your needs are - for example you may not be able to use an external library. The other answer is good though. –  Bohemian Jul 10 '13 at 7:39
    
How 'bout when it exceeds 365 days? Can you do the equivalent years? Thanks. –  KarenAnne Oct 15 '13 at 8:23
    
@KarenAnne what do you mean? Can you give sample input and output please? –  Bohemian Oct 15 '13 at 8:36

The generic method for this is fairly simple:

public static String convertSecondsToHMmSs(long seconds) {
    long s = seconds % 60;
    long m = (seconds / 60) % 60;
    long h = (seconds / (60 * 60)) % 24;
    return String.format("%d:%02d:%02d", h,m,s);
}
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3  
And the string is String.format("%d:%02d:%02d", h,m,s). –  Stephen Hosking Jun 12 '13 at 3:36
1  
@Javaman59, did you mean String.format("% 02 d:%02d:%02d", h,m,s)? –  KarenAnne Oct 15 '13 at 6:44
1  
@KarenAnne. That depends on whether you want, for example, "03:59:59" or "3:59:59". –  Stephen Hosking Oct 19 '13 at 6:13
    
Ohh, I see I see thanks! –  KarenAnne Oct 21 '13 at 11:19

If you are using apache commons:

DurationFormatUtils.formatDuration(timeInMS, "HH:mm:ss,SSS");
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DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss");
String formatted = df.format(aDateObject);
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// New date object from millis
Date date = new Date(millis);
// formattter 
SimpleDateFormat formatter= new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss");
// Pass date object
String formatted = df.format(date );
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This would produce incorrect results for amounts of time more than a day. It would wrap the number of hours from 23 back to 0, which probably isn't desirable here. –  Kenster Jun 20 at 12:44
    
No buddy... I think it would still work the same. try with today date –  Vinay Lodha Jun 23 at 4:23

I tried as shown in the first answer. It works, but minus brought me into confusion. My answer by Groovy:

import static java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit.*

...

private static String formatElapsedTime(long millis) {

    int hrs = MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis) % 24
    int min = MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis) % 60
    int sec = MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(millis) % 60
    int mls = millis % 1000

    sprintf( '%02d:%02d:%02d (%03d)', [hrs, min, sec, mls])
}
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Test results for the 4 implementations

Having to do a lot of formatting for huge data, needed the best performance, so here are the (surprising) results:

for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) { FUNCTION_CALL }

Durations:

  • combinationFormatter: 196 millis
  • formatDuration: 272 millis
  • apacheFormat: 754 millis
  • formatTimeUnit: 2216 millis

    public static String apacheFormat(long millis) throws ParseException {
        return DurationFormatUtils.formatDuration(millis, "HH:mm:ss");
    }
    
    public static String formatTimeUnit(long millis) throws ParseException {
    String formatted = String.format(
            "%02d:%02d:%02d",
            TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis),
            TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis)
                    - TimeUnit.HOURS.toMinutes(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis)),
            TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(millis)
                    - TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis)));
        return formatted;
    }
    
    public static String formatDuration(final long millis) {
        long seconds = (millis / 1000) % 60;
        long minutes = (millis / (1000 * 60)) % 60;
        long hours = millis / (1000 * 60 * 60);
    
        StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
        b.append(hours == 0 ? "00" : hours < 10 ? String.valueOf("0" + hours) : 
        String.valueOf(hours));
        b.append(":");
        b.append(minutes == 0 ? "00" : minutes < 10 ? String.valueOf("0" + minutes) :     
        String.valueOf(minutes));
        b.append(":");
        b.append(seconds == 0 ? "00" : seconds < 10 ? String.valueOf("0" + seconds) : 
        String.valueOf(seconds));
        return b.toString();
    }
    
    public static String combinationFormatter(final long millis) {
        long seconds = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(millis)
                - TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis));
        long minutes = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(millis)
                - TimeUnit.HOURS.toMinutes(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis));
        long hours = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(millis);
    
        StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
        b.append(hours == 0 ? "00" : hours < 10 ? String.valueOf("0" + hours) : 
        String.valueOf(hours));
        b.append(":");
        b.append(minutes == 0 ? "00" : minutes < 10 ? String.valueOf("0" + minutes) : 
        String.valueOf(minutes));
            b.append(":");
        b.append(seconds == 0 ? "00" : seconds < 10 ? String.valueOf("0" + seconds) : 
        String.valueOf(seconds));
        return b.toString(); 
     }
    
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how reliable are metrics like these? I've never really understood the process. –  mre Feb 11 at 14:31
    
In my situation where some thousands of objects are created in succession, this test I think is pretty useful. Okay not setting just some strings, but creating objects which have one field a formatted string. –  MariusA Feb 11 at 23:40
    
I didn't ask about usefulness..I asked about reliability. Also, this may be due to inexperience on my side, but creating thousands of objects in succession in memory sounds like a code smell. –  mre Feb 12 at 14:21

Well, you could try something like this, :

public String getElapsedTimeHoursMinutesSecondsString() {       
     long elapsedTime = getElapsedTime();  
     String format = String.format("%%0%dd", 2);  
     elapsedTime = elapsedTime / 1000;  
     String seconds = String.format(format, elapsedTime % 60);  
     String minutes = String.format(format, (elapsedTime % 3600) / 60);  
     String hours = String.format(format, elapsedTime / 3600);  
     String time =  hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds;  
     return time;  
 }  

to convert milliseconds to a time value

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