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Here is a sample of what I am trying to accomplish:

public class BaseClass<T>
{
    public static T GetByID(int ID)
    {
        // Need database name here that is determined at design time in the derived class.
        var databaseName = "";
        // do some stuff involving database name that gets me object by ID here.
        return default(T);
    }
}
public class DerivedClass : BaseClass<DerivedClass>
{
    private string DatabaseName { get; set; }
}

Basically, how would I access the derived "DatabaseName" in the base class static GetByID method?

EDIT: After I posted this, I tried one more thing. I played with attributes earlier, and failed, but I think my brain was mushy. Just tried again and ran a test, and it is working. Here is the updated sample.

public class BaseClass<T>
{
    public static T GetByID(int ID)
    {
        // Need database name here that is determined at design time in the derived class.
        var databaseName = ((DatabaseAttribute)typeof(T).GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DatabaseAttribute), true).First()).DatabaseName;
        // do some stuff involving database name that gets me object by ID here.
        return default(T);
    }
}
[Database("MyDatabase")]
public class DerivedClass : BaseClass<DerivedClass>
{

}
public class DatabaseAttribute : Attribute
{
    public DatabaseAttribute(string databaseName)
    {
        DatabaseName = databaseName;
    }
    public string DatabaseName { get; set; }
}
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Wouldn't it be better to put the database name setup into the static initializer? –  Bob Vale May 10 '13 at 14:22

3 Answers 3

static methods do not have access to instance members. You can't access to it even if it was in the same class.

What you can do is to make GetByID receive DatabaseName as a parameter.

public static T GetByID(string databaseName, int id) 

If DatabaseName is global the best option you can use project settings. What you need to do is to go to project properties -> Settings and add a new configuration entry named "DatabaseName" with type "string" and value "MyDatabase". Then you can access to it from anywhere in the project using:

string databaseName = Properties.Settings.Default.DatabaseName;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I should have clarified I was trying to avoid having to pass databaseName in everytime I did the GetByID call. –  Jeremy Armstrong Jan 27 '12 at 1:09
    
I suggested a better alternative. See my edit. –  ssg Jan 27 '12 at 9:28
    
I am storing the database information in the configuration file, but the project uses several different schemas and databases. Basically, each class is related to a specific schema and database. I needed to set this during design time, but also be able to access it statically from the base class. I am new to StackOverflow, so I will try to get better with being completely descriptive. –  Jeremy Armstrong Jan 27 '12 at 15:09
    
Then what's preventing you from moving DatabaseName to the base class? –  ssg Jan 27 '12 at 15:52
    
Because each derived class uses a potentially different database and/or schema. If I set it in the base class... then all derived classes will have same value. The requirement was I needed the base class to be able to access a derived class value in a static base method (which is working through the use of custom class attributes). –  Jeremy Armstrong Jan 27 '12 at 15:57

Base class to derived class is a one-way inheritance: The base class has no knowledge of the existance of a derived class, and so it can't access it.

In addition to that you will have a hard time accessing a non-static property from a static method.

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I know you've already answered your own question, but some improvements....

Add a where clause to guarantee inheritance, it means any static methods can make use of inherited methods. You might also want to add the new() clause if you wish to be able to create instances of the inherited class.

public class BaseClass<T> : where T : BaseClass<T>
{

    static readonly string databaseName;


    static BaseClass() {
      // Setup database name once per type of T by putting the initialization in
      // the static constructor

      databaseName = typeof(T).GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DatabaseAttribute),true)
                              .OfType<DatabaseAttribute>()
                              .Select(x => x.Name)
                              .FirstOrDefault();
    }

    public static T GetByID(int ID)
    {
        // Database name will be in the static field databaseName, which is unique
        // to each type of T

        // do some stuff involving database name that gets me object by ID here.
        return default(T);
    }
}

[Database("MyDatabase")]
public class DerivedClass : BaseClass<DerivedClass>
{

}

public class DatabaseAttribute : Attribute
{
    public DatabaseAttribute(string databaseName)
    {
        DatabaseName = databaseName;
    }
    public string DatabaseName { get; set; }
}
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