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In my c# app, I pass a string variable that is of format yyyymmdd-yyyymmdd that represents a from and to date. I want to get the start and end times for these dates respectively. Currently I have the below code but was wondering if there was more of an elegant solution?

So for pdr = 20090521-20090523 would get "20090521 00:00:00" and "20090523 23:59:59"

private void ValidateDatePeriod(string pdr, out DateTime startDate, 
                                out DateTime endDate)
{
    string[] dates = pdr.Split('-');

    if (dates.Length != 2)
    {
        throw new Exception("Date period is of incorrect format");
    }

    if (dates[0].Length != 8 || dates[1].Length != 8)
    {
        throw new Exception("Split date periods are of incorrect format");
    }

    startDate = DateTime.ParseExact(dates[0] + " 00:00:00", 
        "yyyyMMdd HH:mm:ss", null);
    endDate = DateTime.ParseExact(dates[1] + "23:59:59", 
        "yyyyMMdd HH::mm:ss", null);
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you are only worried about .Net precision...

startDate = DateTime.ParseExact(dates[0], "yyyyMMdd");
endDate = DateTime.ParseExact(dates[1], "yyyyMMdd").AddDays(1).AddTicks(-1);

You really don't need to concatenate extra values onto the string for the time portion.


As an addendum, if you are using this for a query against, for example, a database...

startDate = DateTime.ParseExact(dates[0], "yyyyMMdd");
endDate = DateTime.ParseExact(dates[1], "yyyyMMdd").AddDays(1);

With a query of...

WHERE "startDate" >= @startDate AND "endDate" < @endDate

Then the precision issues noted in the comments won't really matter. The endDate in this case would not be part of the range, but the outside boundary.

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1  
It should be AddTicks(-1) –  JarrettV May 31 '11 at 21:38
    
fixed, thanks... –  Tracker1 Jul 22 '11 at 19:46
    
NB: if you are working with a database, you probably have to read the small print on the database's accuracy for 'end of day'. The example I hit was SQL Server DateTime type. It's accurate to about 3 milliseconds so end of day becomes .AddMilliseconds(-3) –  Chris F Carroll Mar 24 at 13:07
    
@ChrisFCarroll Personally, I prefer to use dtm >= start && dtm < end where end is the date you are looking for something before. –  Tracker1 Mar 26 at 22:49
    
I think you've made me realise that 'end of the day' is in fact a non-existent notion, and hence We're Doing It Wrong. Using < end doesn't address the precision issue either, e.g.: Select Case When Cast('20140101 23:59:59.999' as DateTime) < Cast('20140102' as DateTime) Then 'I have millisecond precision' Else 'I cannot tell the difference' End –  Chris F Carroll Mar 27 at 15:45

You could define two extension methods somewhere, in a utility class like so :

public static DateTime EndOfDay(this DateTime date)
{
    return new DateTime(date.Year, date.Month, date.Day, 23, 59, 59, 999);
}

public static DateTime StartOfDay(this DateTime date)
{
    return new DateTime(date.Year, date.Month, date.Day, 0, 0, 0, 0);
}

And then use them in code like so :

public DoSomething()
{
    DateTime endOfThisDay = DateTime.Now.EndOfDay();
}
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3  
Nice answer, but incorrect. Please see the screenshot I provided as to see why. –  Anar Khalilov Dec 18 '13 at 13:43
    
Indeed. Use Anar Khalilov's one, it's better. –  Andrei Rînea Jul 22 at 15:35
1  
That is very modest of you Andrei. –  Anar Khalilov Jul 22 at 16:41

I am surprised to see how an incorrect answer received so many upvotes:

Wrong value

The correct version would be as follows:

public static DateTime StartOfDay(this DateTime theDate)
{
    return theDate.Date;
}

public static DateTime EndOfDay(this DateTime theDate)
{
    return theDate.Date.AddDays(1).AddTicks(-1);
}
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You're right! Upvoted. –  Andrei Rînea Dec 18 '13 at 16:24
    
as mentioned by @Chris F Carroll, -1 tick may not be correct also. –  liang May 28 at 11:21
    
@liang, he mentioned: "AddTick(-1) only works under the convention that there are no time intervals smaller than a tick". Is there a smaller time inverval in .NET? –  Anar Khalilov May 28 at 11:41
    
He gave example when working with database. Database implementation varies. When in those scenarios, -1 tick may not be the end of the day anymore. At least, should not be relied on to use equal comparison. In the same spirit of floating numbers, you can't say what is the biggest floating number that is smaller than an integer reliably which depends on implementation details. Rather greater/less is probably better. –  liang May 29 at 3:02

The DateTime object has a property called Date which will return just the date portion. (The time portion is defaulted to 12:00 am).

I would recommend as a more elegant solution (IMHO) that if you want to allow any datetime on the last day, then you add 1 day to the date, and compare to allow times greater than or equal to the start date, but strictly less than the end date (plus 1 day).

// Calling code.  beginDateTime and endDateTime are already set.
// beginDateTime and endDateTime are inclusive.
// targetDateTime is the date you want to check.
beginDateTime = beginDateTime.Date;
endDateTime = endDateTime.Date.AddDays(1);

if ( beginDateTime <= targetDateTime &&
     targetDateTime < endDateTime )
   // Do something.
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i was wanting to return 2 datetimes from parsing a string, so the calling method could then use these dates to query my db. –  David May 24 '09 at 0:59
1  
@Matt: your advice is particularly sound if times can have a sub-second resolution. –  Jonathan Leffler May 24 '09 at 2:48

That's pretty much what I would do, with some small tweaks (really no big deal, just nitpicking):

  • The TryParse()/TryParseExact() methods should be used which return false instead of throwing exceptions.
  • FormatException is more specific than Exception
  • No need to check for Length == 8, because ParseExact()/TryParseExact() will do this
  • "00:00:00" and "23:59:59" are not needed
  • return true/false is you were able to parse, instead of throwing an exception (remember to check value returned from this method!)

Code:

private bool ValidateDatePeriod(string pdr, out DateTime startDate, 
    					out DateTime endDate)
{
   string[] dates = pdr.Split('-');

   if (dates.Length != 2)
   {
       return false;
   }

   // no need to check for Length == 8 because the following will do it anyway
   // no need for "00:00:00" or "23:59:59" either, I prefer AddDays(1)

   if(!DateTime.TryParseExact(dates[0], "yyyyMMdd", null, DateTimeStyles.None, out startDate))
      return false;

   if(!DateTime.TryParseExact(dates[1], "yyyyMMdd", null, DateTimeStyles.None, out endDate))
      return false;

   endDate = endDate.AddDays(1);
   return true;
}
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thanks for the comments. good to know i was on the right track and grateful for the tweaks –  David May 24 '09 at 2:44

I think we're doing it wrong. There is no such thing as the end of the day. AddTick(-1) only works under the convention that there are no time intervals smaller than a tick. Which is implementation dependent. Admittedly the question comes with a reference implementation, namely the .Net Framework DateTime class, but still we should take this as a clue that the function we really want is not EndOfDay() but StartOfNextDay()

public static DateTime StartOfNextDay(this DateTime date)
{
    return date.Date.AddDays(1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why don't we do it AddSeconds(-1), instead of Add Ticks? Last second of the day is accurate enough for most scenarios. –  liang May 28 at 11:19

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