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When using a has many association to manage a serious of tags, what is the most efficient way to order/sort the collection by the number of tags selected.

For example:

  • Product can have many tags through ProductTags
  • When a user selects the tags, I would like to order the products by the number of the selected tags each product has.

Is it possible to use a cache_counter or something similar in this case? I'm not convinced using sort is the best option. Am I correct in thinking that using order on the actual database is generally faster than sort?

Clarification/update

Sorry if the above is confusing. Basically what I'm after is closer to ordering by relevancy. For example a user might select tag 1, 2, and 4. If an product has all tree tags associated with it, I want that product listed first. The second product might only have tags 1 & 4. And so on. I'm almost certain that this will have to use sort versus order, but was wondering if anyone has found a more efficient way of doing this.

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2 Answers 2

Ordering by relevance within the database is both possible and far more efficient than using the sort method in Ruby. Assuming the following model structure and an appropriate underlying SQL table structure:

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :product_taggings
  has_many :product_tags, :through => :product_taggings
end

class ProductTags < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :product_taggings
  has_many :products, :through => :product_taggings
end

class ProductTaggings < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :product
  belongs_to :product_tags
end

Querying for relevance in MySQL would look something like:

SELECT
  `product_id`
  ,COUNT(*) AS relevance
FROM
  `product_taggings` AS ptj
LEFT JOIN
  `products` AS p
    ON p.`id` = ptj.`product_id`
LEFT JOIN
  `product_tags` AS pt
    ON pt.`id` = ptj.`product_tag_id`
WHERE
  pt.`name` IN ('Tag 1', 'Tag 2')
GROUP BY
  `product_id`

If I have the following products and related tags:

Product 1 -> Tag 3
Product 2 -> Tag 1, Tag 2
Product 3 -> Tag 1, Tag 3

Then the WHERE clause from above should net me:

product_id | relevance
----------------------
         2 |         2
         3 |         1

* Product 1 is not included since there were no matches.
  Given that the user is performing a filtered search,
  this behavior is probably fine.  There's a way to get
  Product 1 into the results with 0 relevance if
  necessary.

What you've done is create a nice little result set that can act as a sort of inline join table. In order to stick a relevance score onto each row of a query from your products table, use this query as a subquery as follows:

SELECT *
FROM
  `products` AS p
  ,(SELECT
      `product_id`
      ,COUNT(*) AS relevance
    FROM
      `product_taggings` AS ptj
    LEFT JOIN
      `products` AS p
        ON p.`id` = ptj.`product_id`
    LEFT JOIN
      `product_tags` AS pt
        ON pt.`id` = ptj.`product_tag_id`
    WHERE
      pt.`name` IN ('Tag 1', 'Tag 2')
    GROUP BY `product_id`
  ) AS r
WHERE
  p.`id` = r.`product_id`
ORDER BY
  r.`relevance` DESC

What you'll have is a result set containing the fields from your products table and an additional relevance column at the end that will then be used in the ORDER BY clause.

You'll need to write up a method that will in-fill this query with your desired pt.name IN list. Be certain to sanitize that list before plugging it into the query or you'll open yourself up to possible SQL injection.

Take the result of your query assembling method and run it through Product.find_by_sql(my_relevance_sql) to get your models pre-sorted by relevance directly from the DB.

The obvious down-side is that you introduce a DBMS-specific dependency into your Rails code (and risk SQL injection if you're not careful). If you're not using MySQL, the syntax might need to be adapted. However, it should perform much faster, especially on a huge result set, than using a Ruby sort on the results. Furthermore, adding a LIMIT clause will give you pagination support if needed.

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Building on Ryan's excellent answer, I wanted a method that could be used acts-as-taggable-on and similar plug-ins (tables called tags/taggings), and ended up with this:

def Product.find_by_tag_list(tag_list)
  tag_list_sql = "'" + tag_list.join("','") + "'"
  Product.find_by_sql("SELECT * FROM products, (SELECT taggable_id, COUNT(*) AS relevance FROM taggings LEFT JOIN tags ON tags.id = taggings.tag_id WHERE tags.name IN (" + tag_list_sql + ") GROUP BY taggable_id) AS r WHERE products.id = r.taggable_id ORDER BY r.relevance DESC;")
end

To get a list of related products ordered by relevance, I then can do:

Product.find_by_tag_list(my_product.tag_list)
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