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I'm new to Win 8 Metro application development, and discovered that lots of things seem to be changed from the classic WPF.

What troubles me the most is that there's no way to close the app. This is extremely annoying when it comes to debugging the app. Therefore I'm looking at ways to add a "close" button in my app.

However, the old WPF way of:

Application.Current.Shutdown()

no longer exists. And I couldn't find the Process class in System.Diagnostics any more.

Does anyone know how to do this?

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How about just pressing Alt+F4? –  Gabe Jan 27 '12 at 2:53
2  
The lack of closing is by design - lifetime management is supposed to take care of resources, and "Close" button in the app is frowned upon as a matter of UI design. If you just need to close for debugging, have you considered using taskkill? You can create an icon for it on the desktop or taskbar, and then assign a shortcut key for convenience. –  Pavel Minaev Jan 27 '12 at 3:13
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@Pavel: It seems like a suboptimal design to force users to resort to some expert maneuver to deal with a misbehaving app. If an app can't close itself, Windows should provide a way to do so. –  Gabe Jan 27 '12 at 3:37
4  
Hehe, it's going to take a while to get Windows programmers used to the new ways. What exactly is the point of exiting a program? It will just take longer when I need it again. Clearly this should be an OS job and not a user annoyance. File + Save is long overdue to be excised as well. Etcetera. Sigh, I'm out of taskbar button space, gotta close something. –  Hans Passant Jan 27 '12 at 13:30
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You can think of metro apps as websites. You can't "kill" a website, can you? –  lukas Jan 27 '12 at 16:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 26 down vote accepted

You're looking for App.Current.Exit()

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1  
@OMA Do you find the way of closing apps on an iPad/iPhone more intuitive? (Press Home to leave app, double-press Home to open list of running apps, tap-hold the icon for your app until it starts to shake, then press the tiny red cross to close it.) –  Tormod Fjeldskår Oct 3 '12 at 6:01
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That's not better certainly, but at least it was a new system with this behaviour from the start. In the case of Windows 8, it has a legacy of versions where apps were closed just by pressing an X in the top right corner. Why don't keep that for metro apps? (specially when using a desktop PC!). That's easy and EVERYONE already knows that. Dragging the mouse from up to down to close an app is not very discoverable unless they show a tutorial the first time Windows 8 is run (and if they really have to do that, then it just shows how unintuitive the whole thing is). –  OMA Oct 23 '12 at 5:03

The WinRT reference documentation for the developer preview states that:

CoreApplication.Exit | exit method

Shuts down the app.

Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/windows.applicationmodel.core.coreapplication.exit.aspx

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2  
It only used for testing or debugging scenarios, and failed to pass MS ACK and not allow to publish to Windows Store. –  Yigang Wu Dec 19 '12 at 16:13

This is what I found to close the app.

  App.Current.Exit();
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As far as I know you can't close a Metro app (by design) (using the Task-Manager is the only option that works) and as far as I know there is no way to exit a Metro app programatically (by design too).

You could try to throw an unhandled exception (I wouldn't recommend that).

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ALT + F4 still even works with Windows Store apps –  Jürgen Bayer Nov 9 '12 at 8:27
    
True, but wasn't in the beta and/or RC. –  Jay Nov 23 '12 at 3:13

Try this.. It worked

App.Current.Terminate();
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I used crash code to exit Windows 8 Metro APP. char *p = nullptr; *p = 1;

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Never crash an app to cause exit, it's really bad practice. Also, apps can now be withdrawn from the windows store if their crash count is too high. –  Jon Rea Jan 8 '13 at 14:05

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