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I've been looking through other questions/answers, but couldn't find anything that was helping. I have users and events and static_events. I now want to introduce a schedule for users to save the two different types of "events"

I'm getting hung up on organizing the associations. Specifically associating events and static_events to a specific :foreign_key to create the schedule. This is my first app, so things are still a bit new. As always, any help would be greatly appreciated. Here is what I have so far:

models:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :events, :through => :schedules, :source => "followed_id"
  has_many :static_events, :through => :schedules, :source => "followed_id"
end

class Event  < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :users
  belongs_to :schedules, :foreign_key => "followed_id"
end

class StaticEvent  < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :users
  belongs_to :schedules, :foreign_key => "followed_id"
end

class Schedule  < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :users
  has_many :events
  has_many :static_events 
end

data schemas:

create_table "schedules",
 t.integer   "followed_id" 
end

create_table "users",
  t.string   "name"
  t.string   "email"
  t.datetime "created_at"
  t.datetime "updated_at"
end

create_table "events",
  t.string   "content"
  t.integer  "user_id"
  t.datetime "created_at"
  t.datetime "updated_at"
  #several more fields left out for brevity
end

create_table "static_events",
  t.string   "content"
  t.integer  "user_id"
  t.datetime "created_at"
  t.datetime "updated_at"
  #several more fields left out for brevity
end

Am I going about this in the most efficient way possible?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code is fine. However, it's not clear why you have two different models Event and StaticEvent. In your migration it appears that they have the same fields. This seems like a good case for single-table inheritance. In that scenario your Event model would be unchanged, but StaticEvent would look like this:

class StaticEvent < Event
  # ...
end

It inherits from Event instead of directly from ActiveRecord::Base. This means it gets all of Event's behaviors but you can also define methods and variables specific to StaticEvent only.

With single-table inheritance you would have no static_events table, but your events table would have an additional string field type. Rails would take care of the rest.

However, if StaticEvent doesn't have any methods or variables different from Event except "this is a static one," and you don't think you'll have more in the future, it would make more sense to just use Event for both and give it an is_static field with a boolean type. In this case your Schedule model would look like this:

class Schedule  < ActiveRecord::Base
  # ...

  has_many :events,        :conditions => { :is_static => false }

  has_many :static_events, :conditions => { :is_static => true },
                           :class_name => 'Event'
end

This way each association has its own name (events and static_events) but both refer to the same model (:class_name => 'Event'). The only difference is the conditions, which specify which Event records are part of that association. This also lets you do things like Schedule.static_events.create ... and Schedule.static_events.where(...).first, etc., for free.

And finally, you say you "now want to introduce a schedule for users to save the two different types of 'events.'" If this is your only reason for creating the Schedule module you should simply drop the Schedule model and define the above associations on User directly. There's no need for an extra Schedule model here unless it's going to have its own attributes and/or methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Jordan, my mistake - I updated the code, they do have several different fields. That being said, I think single-table inheritance is still definitely the way to go. Other than that, joining Event and StaticEvent with User on the same :foreign_key is OK and won't cause any problems? –  Alekx Jan 27 '12 at 3:55
    
What's the purpose of Schedule? Is it meant to be a class all its own or is it merely a mapping between users and the events they've saved (in which case Scheduling or Attending might be better names). –  Jordan Jan 27 '12 at 4:56
    
Good call, Attending is a much better name. It is meant to be a mapping between users and the events they've saved. But after thinking I will need to keep Event and StaticEvent as separate models as they will have too much divergent information. There is also the potential for other models that would need to be created and added to Attending. In light of this, would my original code/logic still be appropriate, granted the name change of Schedule to Attending? –  Alekx Jan 27 '12 at 16:22
    
In this case Attending would be a join model in a has_many :through relation. It would have two columns, user_id and event_id. Your User model is essentially correct. For each event that a User "follows" a new record will be created in attendings with the User's id and the Event's id. The Association Basics Rails Guide has a good section on this that maps closely to what you're doing. –  Jordan Jan 27 '12 at 22:38
    
Thanks again for your help Jordan. I appreciate it and have a much better understanding going forward. –  Alekx Jan 28 '12 at 16:41

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