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I'm trying to write a regular expression that will validate that user input is greater than X number of non-whitespace characters. I'm basically trying to filter out begining and ending whitespace while still ensuring that the input is greater than X characters; the characters can be anything, just not whitespace (space, tab, return, newline). This the regex I've been using, but it doesn't work:

\s.{10}.*\s

I'm using C# 4.0 (Asp.net Regular Expression Validator) btw if that matters.

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Does it have to be a regex? You could do it without a regex pretty easily. –  Daniel Mann Jan 27 '12 at 3:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It may be easier to not use regex at all:

input.Where(c => !char.IsWhiteSpace(c)).Count() > 10

If whitespace shouldn't count in the middle, then this will work:

(\s*(\S)\s*){10,}

If you don't care about whitespace in between non-whitespace characters, the other answers have that scenario covered.

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Sorry, just updated. I'm using a regular expression validator. –  Mark Jan 27 '12 at 3:48
    
@Mark - should your validation fail if there is whitespace in the middle of some valid characters, e.g. ` f a i l ` –  John Rasch Jan 27 '12 at 3:52
    
Nope, thats fine, just so long as there is X characters between the first non-whitespace and the last non-whitespace. –  Mark Jan 27 '12 at 3:54
    
Cool thanks. It got me on the right track, I ended up going with this: (\b*(\S)).{10,}\b which seems to work based on a few quick tests, but I'm obviously not a regex guru. –  Mark Jan 27 '12 at 4:11
    
Even better: (\b*(\S)\s*){10,}[\S\b] –  Mark Jan 27 '12 at 4:31

This regular expression looks for eight or more characters between the first and last non-whitespace characters, ignoring leading and trailing whitespace:

\s*\S.{8,}\S\s*
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If your trying to check (like in my case a phone number that contains 8 digits) , you need to refer to a number below the one you need.

(\s*(\S)\s*){7,}
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