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I'm learning about the wonders of jquery and just wanted to see if either of these methods was preferred.

Example 1

<style type="text/css">span:hover {background: yellow;}</style>
<span>Hello!</span>

Example 2

<style type="text/css">span.highlight{background:yellow;}</style>
<script type="text/javascript">
$("span").hover(function () {
    $(this).addClass("highlight");
    }, function () {
    $(this).removeClass("highlight");
});
<span>Hello!</span>
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Agreed with Christian. A concrete example: CSS will work on browsers that do not support javascript, and for users (such as corporate and high-security users) who have javascript turned off. –  sscirrus Jan 27 '12 at 4:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The answer pretty much goes like this: "If you can do it with CSS, do it with CSS". CSS handles what you're doing with less code, is better supported, and doesn't require a library like jQuery.

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Thanks, best answer in 9 minutes, checked out your site, your 'about us' section is hilarious and awesome at the same time –  user784637 Jan 27 '12 at 4:12
    
Okay in 2 minutes you scored 5 upvotes, which is the most you've got for any answer lol –  user784637 Jan 27 '12 at 4:14
1  
Thanks :). Sometimes you win, and today was my day. But yeah that's the rule, try and keep all presentation related code in CSS. Use JS for DOM manipulation etc. –  Christian Varga Jan 27 '12 at 4:28

Just about everyone here has been pretty spot on. jQuery has to load before any of this other fancy stuff can be done. Usually though, the minified jQuery load time is pretty insignificant. I wouldn't necessarily worry about that.

However, I've found that simple things like hovers there is absolutely no reason to use jquery. In your hover function, it seems useless to use jQuery on first thought, but the advantage is that you can basically do any number of things with a simple line of code that you'd never be able to do with CSS - especially across most browsers.

For instance:

$("span").hover(function () {
    $(this).addClass("highlight");
    }, function () {
    $(this).removeClass("highlight");
});

Really no reason to use jQuery if all you wanted was a hover. In CSS you'd be able to specify any number of things on your hover... BUT you wouldn't be able to do some really slick animations. So let's take your code and leave the amount of code basically the same, but think about the possibilities jQuery offers.

$("span").hover(function () {
      $(this).animate({width:'100px'}, 500); 
      $(".other-div").fadeIn(200);
    }, function () {
      $(this).animate({width:'50px'}, 500);
      $(".other-div").fadeOut(200); 
});

So in that example we're not only changing the width (something you could do with pure CSS) but now we're animating as we hover. Additionally, we're fading in "other-div" at the same time! So we can target other elements to move pretty easily.

Another reason you may want to use jQuery in your initial instance would be to make a change to the element and leave it changed after the user has interacted with it. So it's no longer just a hover, but a mouseover event that triggers some action, but it stays that way until the user does something else.

I think the main thing to take away is that jQuery is not a replacement for CSS or vise versa. But they really should be used together. Use CSS whenever you can do something simple (like hovers, etc). but When you want the added "oomph" use jQuery to kick it up a notch.

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For a simple hover It's better to use only CSS , except if you'd want to change the background of another element.

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You can still traverse down the tree with CSS, eg: .parent:hover .child { color: red }. But travelling up, don't think it's possible without js. –  Christian Varga Jan 27 '12 at 4:20
    
you're right. That's another good reason to use jQuery. I really wish they would build that aspect into the next go of CSS. That and variables! –  Jeremy Miller Jan 27 '12 at 17:17

if you are to use jQuery it will load the whole jQuery library and that will slow down your website. if you can do it with css it would be much faster and you wouldent have to write like 5 lines instead you could write the one or two.

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The answer is do it with css because ,

  • CSS is always faster than javascript
  • They are users using browsers with javascript disabled.
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One more thing to consider is readability and maintainability of your code.

Let's say you have already tons of jQuery code for a lot of effects and another developer wants to change something concerning effects, he will probably look into those files. When you now exclude the hover effect, this is not a consistent structure.

Of course in general doing it in CSS is the better approach, but under certain circumstances it makes sense to organize the code a little bit more logically and putting all the effects in jQuery files.

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