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Possible Duplicate:
Interrupting epoll_wait with a non-IO event, no signals

I have a thread that is currently using epoll_wait to flag the arrival of data on some sockets. The timeout parameter is currently set to zero.

However, the thread also does other tasks. What I want to do is change this so that if there is no work to be done then make it an indefinite or long time out. This will dramatically reduce wasted CPU cycles spinning when there is no actual work to do.

The whole thing is driven mostly by the arrival of a message on a thread safe lock free queue.

So, what I think should happen is I should wake up the thread from it's long timeout using epoll_pwait.

However, I'm unsure what signal to send it and how this is done. I'm not familiar with Linux signals.

The following is similar to what I currently have. Dramatically shorted to show the concept. If you spot a bug, don't bother pointing it out, this is just an illustration that I've typed in here to help you understand what I'm wanting to achieve.

// Called from another thread...
void add_message_to_queue(struct message_t* msg)
{
    add_msg(msg);
    raise( ? );  // wake the state machine?
}


// different thread to the above.
main_thread()
{
    struct message_t msg;
    while (msg = get_message_from_queue())
      process_message(msg);

    timeout = work_available ? 0 : -1;

    nfds = epoll_pwait(epfd, events, MAX_EPOLL_EVENTS, timeout);
    for (i = 0; i < nfds; ++i)
    {
        if ((events[i].events & EPOLLIN) == EPOLLIN)
        {
           /// do stuff
        }
    }

    run_state_machines();
}

So I guess my question is really, is this the right way of going about it? and if so, what signal do I send and do I need to define a signal handler or can I use the signal disposition "ignore" and still be woken?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by rob mayoff, wallyk, Joachim Pileborg, Ben Jackson, Laurent Etiemble Jan 27 '12 at 11:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@rob mayoff thanks that other answer which I didn't see before was very helpful. Happy to close this as a duplicate – Matt Jan 27 '12 at 5:14
    
@MattH: signals don't work well in threaded processes because asynchronous signals (ones delivered by kill()) can go to any thread. – Ben Jackson Jan 27 '12 at 7:29
    
As mentioned here win.tue.nl/~aeb/linux/lk/lk-12.html : "If a signal occurs, the call will return with errno set to EINTR.". – Simon Mar 2 '14 at 19:14
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of signals, consider using a pipe. Create a pipe and add the file descriptor for the read end of the pipe to the epoll. When you want to wake the epoll_wait call, just write 1 character to the write end of the pipe.

int read_pipe;
int write_pipe;
void InitPipe()
{
    int pipefds[2] = {};
    epoll_event ev = {};
    pipe(pipefds, 0);
    read_pipe = pipefds[0];
    write_pipe = pipefds[1];

    // make read-end non-blocking
    int flags = fcntl(read_pipe, F_GETFL, 0);
    fcntl(write_pipe, F_SETFL, flags|O_NONBLOCK);

    // add the read end to the epoll
    ev.events = EPOLLIN;
    ev.data.fd = read_pipe;
    epoll_ctl(epfd, EPOLL_CTL_ADD, read_pipe, &ev);

}

void add_message_to_queue(struct message_t* msg)
{
    char ch = 'x';
    add_msg(msg);
    write(write_pipe, &ch, 1);
}

main_thread()
{
    struct message_t msg;
    while (msg = get_message_from_queue())
      process_message(msg);

    timeout = work_available ? 0 : -1;

    nfds = epoll_pwait(epfd, events, MAX_EPOLL_EVENTS, timeout);

    for (i = 0; i < nfds; ++i)
    {
        if (events[i].data.fd == read_pipe)
        {

            // read all bytes from read end of pipe
            char ch;
            int result = 1;
            while (result > 0)
            {
                result = read(epoll_read, &ch, 1);
            }
        }

        if ((events[i].events & EPOLLIN) == EPOLLIN)
        {
           /// do stuff
        }
    }

    run_state_machines();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Nice suggestion! – wallyk Jan 27 '12 at 7:35
    
I'm liking the eventfd thing on the dupe post... Linux only, but it's the same concept. – selbie Jan 27 '12 at 8:14
    
Thanks, I actually used an eventfd in the end which is an identical concept. However, I'll accept your answer as it's the only answer provided here and works. – Matt Jan 29 '12 at 22:00
    
I think it is actually not correct, as the "self-pipe trick" was mainly used when the selectp and epoll_pwait didn't exist. More info there : win.tue.nl/~aeb/linux/lk/lk-12.html – Simon Mar 2 '14 at 19:13

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