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I have a question regarding static function in php.

let's assume that I have a class

class test {
    public function sayHi() {
        echo 'hi';
    }
}

if I do test::sayHi(); it works without a problem.

class test {
    public static function sayHi() {
        echo 'hi';
    }
}

test::sayHi(); works as well.

What are the differences between first class and second class?

What is special about a static function?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 76 down vote accepted

In the first class, sayHi() is actually an instance method which you are calling as a static method and you get away with it because sayHi() never refers to $this.

Static functions are associated with the class, not an instance of the class. As such, $this is not available from a static context ($this isn't pointing to any object)

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9  
Now static calling of non-static methods works but is deprecated. Be careful using this syntax for instance methods! –  Jet May 24 '09 at 12:52
    
So this why they say it as static function? because there is no multiple instance with dynamic data flow and dynamic output. Just guide me.@chaos –  sun Feb 25 at 13:50

Entire difference is, you don't get $this supplied inside the static function. If you try to use $this, you'll get a Fatal error: Using $this when not in object context.

Well, okay, one other difference: an E_STRICT warning is generated by your first example.

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Simply, static functions function independently of the class where they belong.

$this means, this is an object of this class. It does not apply to static functions.

class test {
    public function sayHi($hi = "Hi") {
        $this->hi = $hi;
        return $this->hi;
    }
}
class test1 {
    public static function sayHi($hi) {
        $hi = "Hi";
        return $hi;
    }
}

//  Test
$mytest = new test();
print $mytest->sayHi('hello');  // returns 'hello'
print test1::sayHi('hello');    //  returns 'hello'
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In a nutshell, you don't have the object as $this in the second case, as the static method is a function/method of the class not the object instance.

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After trying examples (PHP 5.3.5), I found that in both cases of defining functions you can't use $this operator to work on class functions. So I couldn't find a difference in them yet. :(

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Because static methods are callable without an instance of the object created, the pseudo-variable $this is not available inside the method declared as static.

Static properties cannot be accessed through the object using the arrow operator ->.

Calling non-static methods statically generates an E_STRICT level warning.

Like any other PHP static variable, static properties may only be initialized using a literal or constant; expressions are not allowed. So while you may initialize a static property to an integer or array (for instance), you may not initialize it to another variable, to a function return value, or to an object.

As of PHP 5.3.0, it's possible to reference the class using a variable. The variable's value can not be a keyword (e.g. self, parent and static). PHP.NET

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We have created a function under a class in this function we have not user $this after that this function is called the static method. $this means, this is an object of this class. It does not apply to static functions.

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Calling non-static methods statically generates an E_STRICT level warning.

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