Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I define an array of anonymous objects in CoffeeScript? Is this possible at all, using the YAML syntax?

I know that having an array of named objects is quite easy:

items:[
   item1:
      name1:value1
   item2:
      name:value2
]

However, it would be a bit trickier, if those two objects had no names

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

you can't:

this is some tricks:

items:[
    (name:"value1")
    (name:"value2")
]

another

items:[
    true && name:"value1"
    true && name:"value2"
]

this is the best:

items:[
    {name:"value1"}
    {name:"value2"}
]
share|improve this answer
3  
Isn't that so ugly :( Coffeescript is really nice for it's indent based coding but for large object literals it's not much better than standard JSON as you have to balance up all the brackets and you end up with nasty trailing bracket soup. There was a ticket to resolve this and use YAML syntax but apparently there is parsing ambiguity in coffeescript to solve this which is unfortunate. –  bradgonesurfing Apr 16 '12 at 16:46
    
Instead of "true &&" you could of course use the equivalent "yes and" or "no or". "yes and" even kind of makes sense here. –  Jameson Quinn Dec 3 '12 at 3:04
4  
Check out my answer -- this is perfectly doable without any tricks or braces. –  Michael Hays Dec 27 '12 at 18:15
add comment

Simple -- place a comma by itself in a column lower than that in which you define your objects.

a = [
   nameA1: valueA1
   nameA2: valueA2
   nameA3: valueA3
  ,
   nameB1: valueB1
   nameB2: valueB2
   nameB3: valueB3
]

Will become:

var a;

a = [
  {
    nameA1: valueA1,
    nameA2: valueA2,
    nameA3: valueA3
  }, {
    nameB1: valueB1,
    nameB2: valueB2,
    nameB3: valueB3
  }
];
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for a simple approach. –  Sayem Ahmed Jan 5 '13 at 8:32
11  
+1 for the real answer, why OP didn't use this answer? –  mko Apr 9 '13 at 6:48
    
because its a weird lookin solution and the commas are easily missed –  Eddie Monge Jr Oct 3 '13 at 23:29
    
This is dangerous!! Sometimes only gives you an array with the last item ! See my example below.. –  Dean Radcliffe Oct 11 '13 at 19:41
1  
@DeanRadcliffe It will return the last item in the array if you don't place the comma properly, yes, but isn't CoffeeScript built on the premise of convention over syntactical sugar? –  dubilla Jan 16 at 21:42
show 1 more comment

You can also add a coma between each object: 

items:[
    item1:
        name1:value1
  ,
    item2:
        name:value2
]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a simple approach. –  Sayem Ahmed Jan 5 '13 at 8:33
add comment

I think the comma solution is better, but I figured I'd add this for completeness:

a = [
  {
    nameA1: valueA1
    nameA2: valueA2
    nameA3: valueA3
  }
  {
    nameB1: valueB1
    nameB2: valueB2
    nameB3: valueB3
  }
]
share|improve this answer
add comment

I ran into a related problem and found this solution. If you want an array of many single k/v objects without braces, just indent some of them. Seems to do the trick.

data = [                                     
  "2013-09-25T16:46:52.636Z":3,              
    "2013-09-25T16:47:52.636Z":6,            
      "2013-09-25T16:48:52.636Z":2,          
        "2013-09-25T16:49:52.636Z":7,        
  "2013-09-25T16:50:52.636Z":5,              
    "2013-09-25T16:51:52.636Z":2,            
      "2013-09-25T16:52:52.636Z":1,          
        "2013-09-25T16:53:52.636Z":3,        
  "2013-09-25T16:54:52.636Z":8,              
    "2013-09-25T16:55:52.636Z":9,            
      "2013-09-25T16:56:52.636Z":2,          
        "2013-09-25T16:57:52.636Z":5,        
          "2013-09-25T16:58:52.636Z":7       
]                                            

Produces:

coffee> data
[ { '2013-09-25T16:46:52.636Z': 3 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:47:52.636Z': 6 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:48:52.636Z': 2 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:49:52.636Z': 7 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:50:52.636Z': 5 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:51:52.636Z': 2 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:52:52.636Z': 1 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:53:52.636Z': 3 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:54:52.636Z': 8 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:55:52.636Z': 9 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:56:52.636Z': 2 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:57:52.636Z': 5 },
  { '2013-09-25T16:58:52.636Z': 7 } ]

It's counter-intuitive to me; you'd think that this would make sub-objects but I think the comma at the end of the line tells it to stop making properties on that object.

share|improve this answer
    
While this works, I suspect it is a side effect of how the lines are parsed. Since successive lines don't have the same indentation, it can't put them in the same object. Apparently, instead of raising a syntax error, it starts a new object. It's a feature that probably shouldn't be counted on - unless you can find it documented. –  hpaulj Sep 25 '13 at 20:11
    
@hpaulj well if you've got a better way to do this I'm all ears –  jcollum Sep 25 '13 at 20:55
    
Since Python is my 'first language', I'm not afraid to use a few extra brackets and braces. Even if Coffeescript does not need them, I find them to be helpful. Your second block is more readable. –  hpaulj Sep 25 '13 at 22:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.