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I'm currently using em-websocket with Event Machine. It works great, but I also want to provide long polling and/or Flash fall-backs for browsers that don't support Web Sockets (and also so I can run it on Heroku).

I'm basically looking for a Ruby version of Socket.IO, or enough libraries to piece together to get the features I want. I've seen some examples that use Socket.IO, Redis, and a Ruby library that interacts with the Redis DB, but I'd rather keep it simple and just keep it all in Event Machine, rather than having to manage 3 applications instead of one.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Check out Faye - https://github.com/faye/faye.

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You can do this with Socket.IO on the client side and em-websocket with async_sinatra and Thin on the server-side. See here for some info on the topic.

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I didn't realize that. Also, that looks like a great resource. I will check it out. Thanks! – Andrew Jan 27 '12 at 20:09

I was searching for the same and ended up writing the Plezi websocket framework which I wanted to make easier and more intuitive to use... You can even use it inside your Rails/Sintra app (it will replace your Rack server with Iodine if you do so, and both apps will share the same network connection and process)...

a simple websocket chat/echo server - running over the websocket echo sample page - can look something like this:

require 'plezi'

class BroadcastCtrl
    def index
        redirect_to 'http://www.websocket.org/echo.html'
    end
    def on_message data
        # the following two lines are the same as:
        # self.class.broadcast :_send_message, data
        broadcast :_send_message, data
        _send_message data
    end
    def _send_message data
        response << data
    end
end 

route '/', BroadcastCtrl

This is very comfortable for a long-pulling fallback position, as the framework supports both RESTful HTTP and HTTP Streaming.

You can also look into the Plezi client or using any Plezi's Auto-Dispatch feature for auto-dispatching any JSON event to a method. This makes it super easy to write an API for both Websockets and AJAX (AJAJ actually).

Here's a more complicated example, showcasing auto-dispatching, some recursive method calling (using broadcasting, writing data to all the connected clients), AJAX v.s Websoocket recognition, http only requests and websocket only events.

require 'plezi'
class BroadcastCtrl
    @auto_dispatch = true
    def index event = nil
       {event: 'update', target: 'body',
       data: 'my content'}.to_json
    end
    def chat event = nil, broadcast = false
       if broadcast # it's recursive broadcasting
          return write(event.to_json)
       end
       if event == nil #it's AJAX
          msg = params[:msg]
       else # it's websockets
          msg = event[:msg]
       end
       self.class.broadcast :chat, ({event: 'chat', msg: msg}), true
    end
    def http_only
       {event: 'foo', data: 'bar'}.to_json
    end
    protected
    def websocket_only event
       {event: 'foo', data: 'bar'}.to_json
    end
end 
route '/', BroadcastCtrl

The framework also supports easy and native Redis integration, so that broadcasts could propagate through different processes or machines seamlessly.

It also supports slim, haml, sass, coffee-script and hrb templates, so it's possible to move the whole application to one framework, instead of running Sinatra/Rails with a parallel real-time solution (via middleware, via a different app or via a different port access).

...but, to each their own, I guess.

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