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Currently I am facing an issue with my Makefile caused by evaluation of a make variable. I have reduced the complexity, only the essential elements remain that produce the issue.

  • $(LIST) is evaluated as a list of files when the Makefile is read.
  • During step1 one of those files is deleted.
  • When using the variable in step2 it is not evaluated again and thus not valid any more which leads to an error during the copy command.
  • It would be nice if the variable was evaluated at the time it is used, here during step2.

Any ideas how to solve or work around this issue?


Makefile:

LIST=$(wildcard src/*.txt)

all: step1 step2

step1:
    @echo "---------- step1 ----------"
    @echo $(LIST)
    rm src/q1.txt
    ls src

step2:
    @echo "---------- step2 ----------"
    @echo $(LIST)
    cp $(LIST) ./dst

Execution logging:

$ make
---------- step1 ----------
src/q1.txt src/q2.txt
rm src/q1.txt
ls src
q2.txt
---------- step2 ----------
src/q1.txt src/q2.txt
cp src/q1.txt src/q2.txt ./dst
cp: cannot stat `src/q1.txt': No such file or directory
make: *** [step2] Error 1
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Don't use the wildcard function.

LIST = src/*.txt

all: step1 step2

step1:
    @echo "---------- step1 ----------"
    @echo $(LIST)
    rm src/q1.txt
    ls src

step2:
    @echo "---------- step2 ----------"
    @echo $(LIST)
    cp $(LIST) ./dst
share|improve this answer
1  
The reason this works is that the string "src/*.txt" is placed verbatim into the echo and cp commands, where the shell expands it again for each command (instead of make, which did the expansion of $(wildcard)). –  Jack Kelly Jan 27 '12 at 20:06
3  
since the variable is expanded when the recipe is invoked (it used "=" for deferred expansion not ":=" for immediate, or simple, expansion) you would expect the original makefile to work. Here's the problem: for efficiency GNU make caches the contents of directories as it goes. So, if you make changes to the directory structure in a way make doesn't recognize, you can get into these situations where make's idea of what files exist doesn't match with reality. –  MadScientist Jan 28 '12 at 16:42

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