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Is there a shortcut to filter a Map keeping only the entries where the key is contained in a given Set?

Here is some example code

scala> val map = Map("1"->1, "2"->2, "3"->3)
map: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1, 2 -> 2, 3 -> 3)

scala> map.filterKeys(Set("1","2").contains)
res0: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1, 2 -> 2)

I am searching for something shorter than this.

share|improve this question
3  
Something shorter than map.filterKeys(Set("1","2").contains)? Don't you think that is short and clear enough? –  Jesper Jan 27 '12 at 9:23
1  
It's quite clear, but I am searching for something shorter. –  Timo Westkämper Jan 27 '12 at 9:36
    
And it can be indeed! See my answer –  oxbow_lakes Jan 27 '12 at 10:03
1  
Always search for something clearer and more understandable for later, when you are skimming your code –  oxbow_lakes Jan 27 '12 at 10:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Answering the Question

You can take advantage of the fact that a Set[A] is a predicate; i.e. A => Boolean

map filterKeys set

Here it is at work:

scala> val map = Map("1" -> 1, "2" -> 2, "3" -> 3)
map: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1, 2 -> 2, 3 -> 3)

scala> val set = Set("1", "2")
set: scala.collection.immutable.Set[java.lang.String] = Set(1, 2)

scala> map filterKeys set
res0: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1, 2 -> 2)

Or if you prefer:

scala> map filterKeys Set("1", "2")
res1: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1, 2 -> 2)

Predicates

It's actually really useful to have some wrapper around a predicate. Like so:

scala> class PredicateW[A](self: A => Boolean) {
   | def and(other: A => Boolean): A => Boolean = a => self(a) && other(a)
   | def or(other: A => Boolean): A => Boolean = a => self(a) || other(a)
   | def unary_! : A => Boolean = a => !self(a)
   | }
defined class PredicateW

And an implicit conversion:

scala> implicit def Predicate_Is_PredicateW[A](p: A => Boolean) = new PredicateW(p)
Predicate_Is_PredicateW: [A](p: A => Boolean)PredicateW[A]

And then you can use it:

scala> map filterKeys (Set("1", "2") and Set("2", "3"))
res2: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(2 -> 2)

scala> map filterKeys (Set("1", "2") or Set("2", "3"))
res3: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1, 2 -> 2, 3 -> 3)

scala> map filterKeys !Set("2", "3")
res4: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1)

This can be extended to xor, nand etc etc and if you include symbolic unicode can make for amazingly readable code:

val mustReport = trades filter (uncoveredShort ∨ exceedsDollarMax)

val european = { 
  val Europe = (_ : Market).exchange.country.region == Region.EU
  trades filter (_.market ∈: Europe)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great! Thanks a lot. I didn't realise this ;) –  Timo Westkämper Jan 27 '12 at 10:17
2  
Your example with the trades filtering is pretty cool. I like the ∈ method, reads just like maths. –  Guillaume Belrose Jan 27 '12 at 12:05
    
Nice implicit for lifting boolean operations to predicates. I'll be borrowing that. –  Dave Griffith Jan 27 '12 at 12:57
    
Better get myself a Unicode keyboard :-) –  pjp Jan 30 '12 at 20:33

A tangential tip, in case you are going to follow the PredicateW idea in @oxbow_lakes' answer:

In functional programming, instead of defining ad hoc functions, we aim for more generalized and composable abstractions. For this particular case, Applicative fits the bill.

Set themselves are functions, and the Applicative instance for [B]Function1[A, B] lets us lift functions to context. In other words, you can lift functions of type (Boolean, Boolean) => Boolean (such as ||, && etc.) to (A => Boolean, A => Boolean) => (A => Boolean). (Here you can find a great explanation on this concept of lifting.)

However the data structure Set itself has an Applicative instance available, which will be favored over [B]Applicative[A => B] instance. To prevent that, we will have to explicitly tell the compiler to treat the given set as a function. We define a following enrichment for that:

scala> implicit def setAsFunction[A](set: Set[A]) = new {
     |   def f: A => Boolean = set
     | }
setAsFunction: [A](set: Set[A])java.lang.Object{def f: A => Boolean}

scala> Set(3, 4, 2).f
res144: Int => Boolean = Set(3, 4, 2)

And now put this Applicative goodness into use.

scala> val map = Map("1" -> 1, "2" -> 2, "3" -> 3)
map: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1, 2 -> 2, 3 -> 3)

scala> map filterKeys ((Set("1", "2").f |@| Set("2", "3").f)(_ && _))
res150: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(2 -> 2)

scala> map filterKeys ((Set("1", "2").f |@| Set("2", "3").f)(_ || _))
res151: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1, 2 -> 2, 3 -> 3)

scala> map filterKeys (Set("2", "3").f map (!_))
res152: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(1 -> 1)

Note: All of the above requires Scalaz.

share|improve this answer

Sorry, not a direct answer to your question, but if you know which keys you want to remove (instead of which ones you want to keep), you could do this:

map -- Set("3")
share|improve this answer
2  
map -- (map.keySet &~ Set("1","2")) you can always calculate which keys to remove, given you know which keys to keep. (&~ is "set difference", which is hopefully optimized over --) –  Dan Burton Jan 27 '12 at 14:26
    
Not very good in a concurrent environment? –  Vlad Patryshev Mar 3 '12 at 20:42

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