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This concept seems to trouble me. Why does an NSError object need its pointer passed to a method that is modifying the object? For instance, wouldn't just passing a reference to the error do the same thing?

NSError *anError;
[myObjc doStuff:withAnotherObj error:error];

and then in doStuff:

 - (void)doStuff:(id)withAnotherObjc error:(NSError *)error 
 {
    // something went bad!
    [error doSomethingToTheObject];
 }

Why doesn't the above work like most other object messaging patterns work? Why must instead we use error:(NSError **)error?

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4 Answers

up vote 64 down vote accepted

The answer is that in Objective-C a method can only return one value, and this is a case where you want to return two. In C-like languages when you need to return an extra value you ask for a pointer to a value of that type. The NSError** pattern is used when a method returns some value but may also want to return an error object (of type NSError*). A more realistic example would be this:

// The method should return something, because otherwise it could just return
// NSError* directly and the error argument wouldn't be necessary
- (id)doStuff:(id)withAnotherObjc error:(NSError **)error
{
  // Something went bad!
  // The caller might pass NULL for `error` if they don't care about
  // the result, so check for NULL before dereferencing it
  if (error != NULL) *error = [NSError errorWithDomain:...];
  return nil;  // The caller knows to check error if I return nil
}

If you only had an NSError* instead of an NSError** then doStuff would never be able to pass the error object back to its caller.

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Quite simply:

if you pass a pointer to an object to your function, the function can only modify what the pointer is pointing to.

if you pass a pointer to a pointer to an object then the function can modify the pointer to point to another object.

In the case of NSError, the function might want to create a new NSError object and pass you back a pointer to that NSError object. Thus, you need double indirection so that the pointer can be modified.

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4  
This really helps me understand. I'm used to thinking of pointers in the context of languages that distinguish between "byref" and "byval" arguments. Byref args (i.e. variables referenced by pointers) can be changed by the called function and the caller can see the change, so I didn't understand @n8gray's answer: "if you only had an NSError*... doStuff would never be able to pass the error object back to its caller". Your answer "the function can modify the pointer to point to another object" makes clear WHY you would want the ** if the caller can already see changes with just a pointer. –  stifin Aug 15 '11 at 20:45
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Alternate statement of what n8gray said:

Because you're not receiving an object to send messages to; you're creating the object and returning it. You generally need the pointer-to-an-NSError *-variable argument because you can only use the return statement on one thing at a time, and you're already using it with NO.

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Hi, Peter :-) I hope you are having a good start into the new year. While brushing up on C about ** I landed here on this post. Excuse me, I still don't quite get it: if we passed only one * (a pointer to an object), that should suffice for making changes to the object, right? Why would we still need to pass a pointer to a pointer to an object in order to make changes to an object? Thanks very much in advance. Regards. –  Unheilig Jan 8 at 0:03
2  
@Unheilig: “if we passed only one * (a pointer to an object), that should suffice for making changes to the object, right?” Right. You only need the pointer to the object to send messages to that object. “Why would we still need to pass a pointer to a pointer to an object in order to make changes to an object?” Because you're not making changes to an object; you're creating a new object and returning it to the caller. You do that by assigning it at the address the caller gave you—the pointer to the variable where you will put the pointer to the object. –  Peter Hosey Jan 8 at 3:41
    
+1. Thanks for clearing this up as well. –  Unheilig Jan 8 at 15:05
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An old question, but still I think its worth putting this here -

The actual culprit is NSError. If you look at its class reference, there are no setter methods for any of its attributes, i.e. domain, code or userInfo. So there is no way, you can just alloc and initialize a NSError, pass it to the method and then populate information on the passed NSError object. (Had there been a setter method, we could have just passed a NSError * and done something like error.code = 1 in the method.)

So in case there is an error, you have to generate a new NSError object in the method and if you are doing so the only way to pass it back to the caller is by having a NSError ** argument. (For the reason explained in the above answers.)

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