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I have two virtual classes I would like to wrap in boost python, I want to be able to write Python class that extends them. The thing is, one of the classes has a method that return a reference of the other class, and I can't figure how to do.

Here is a simplified version of code of class to be wrapped.

class Foo
{
    public:
    virtual ~Foo() {}
    virtual int a() = 0;
};

class Bar
{
    public:
    virtual ~Bar() {}
    virtual Foo const& b() = 0;
};

So I started wrapping about this way.

class FooWrap : public Foo, public wrapper<Foo>
{
    public:
    int a()
    {
        return this->get_override("a")();
    }
};

class BarWrap : public Bar, public wrapper<Bar>
{
    public:
    Foo const& b()
    {
        return this->get_override("b")();
    }
};

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(foobar)
{
    class_<FooWrap, boost::noncopyable>("Foo")
        .def("a", pure_virtual(&Foo::a))
        ;
    class_<BarWrap, boost::noncopyable>("Bar")
        .def("b", pure_virtual(&Bar::b))
        ;
}

And I get a compile error about "cannot instantiate abstract class [...] pure virtual function was not defined" "see declaration of 'foo::a'"

share|improve this question
    
what if the virtual functions and the inheritance of the wrapper classes are public ? –  babak Jan 28 '12 at 20:28
    
I will try, thanks. –  MatthieuW Jan 29 '12 at 23:43
    
No, setting everything public doesn't solve my issue. –  MatthieuW Jan 30 '12 at 10:36
    
@MatthieuW Is modifying the return type of the functions to a smart pointer an option? –  Paul Manta Jan 31 '12 at 11:10
    
@Paul-Manta No, my goal is to test a c++ library, I can't change its interface. –  MatthieuW Jan 31 '12 at 16:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

I've been able to compile and run your code after I added call policy for Bar::b function:

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(foobar)
{
    class_<FooWrap, boost::noncopyable>("Foo")
        .def("a", pure_virtual(&Foo::a));

    class_<BarWrap, boost::noncopyable>("Bar")
        .def("b", pure_virtual(&Bar::b),
             return_internal_reference<>());
}

Basically, it's just means that lifetime of returned reference from Bar::b should be dependent on lifetime of Bar instance. You can read about call policies in boost docs.

What compiler and boost version are you using? I've got the following descriptive error with boost 1.46.0 and gcc 4.6.1:

error: no match for call to ‘(const boost::python::detail::specify_a_return_value_policy_to_wrap_functions_returning<const Foo&>) (const Foo&)’
share|improve this answer
    
I use boost 1.47.0 and VC 7.1 –  MatthieuW Feb 1 '12 at 15:31
    
There are comments in boost docs for MSVC 6 and 7: you should try return call<int>(this->get_override("a").ptr());. –  alex vasi Feb 1 '12 at 15:41
    
That's it. The MSVC 7 thing. Until now I used the usual syntax and it was working fine, so I thought the MSVC 7 special syntax were no more needed. Actually it is in some cases. –  MatthieuW Feb 2 '12 at 9:39
1  
To be more precise, it is needed for method b. return boost::python::call<Foo const&>(this->get_override("b").ptr()); –  MatthieuW Feb 2 '12 at 9:42

The following code compiles for me. Inside your python Bar subclass you should be able to return a Foo instance from the b method.

#include <boost/python.hpp>

class Foo
{
public:
    virtual ~Foo() {}
    virtual int a() = 0;
};

class Bar
{
public:
    virtual ~Bar() {}
    virtual Foo const& b() = 0;
};


class FooWrap : public Foo, public boost::python::wrapper<Foo>
{
    public:
    int a()
    {
        return this->get_override("a")();
    }
};

class BarWrap : public Bar, public boost::python::wrapper<Bar>
{
    public:
    Foo const& b()
    {
        return this->get_override("b")();
    }
};

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(foobar)
{
    boost::python::class_<FooWrap, boost::noncopyable>("Foo")
        .def("a", boost::python::pure_virtual(&Foo::a)) ;

    boost::python::class_<BarWrap, boost::noncopyable>("Bar")
        .def("b", boost::python::pure_virtual(&Bar::b), boost::python::return_internal_reference<>());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Knowing this work in normal environment was helpful. –  MatthieuW Feb 2 '12 at 9:46

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