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I would like to get this format:

2:18:00 pm

Using the sample code from w3Schools.com below, I can get the correct results from IE and FireFox. But when it comes to Chrome, I get the 24hr clock version where it is simply displayed this way:

14:18:00

In FF

    new Date().toLocaleTimeString()
    //   2:18:00 pm
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use the following javascript code,

<script type="text/javascript">

var d = new Date();
var curr_hour = d.getHours();
var curr_min = d.getMinutes();
var curr_sec = d.getSeconds();
if (curr_hour < 12)
   {
   a_p = "AM";
   }
else
   {
   a_p = "PM";
 }

document.write(curr_hour + ":" + curr_min + ":" 
+ curr_sec+ a_p);

</script>

The o/p would be as you expect,2:18:00 PM

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This returns 14:18:00 PM for me. I think you meant to subtract 12 hours if it's PM? –  Eli Dec 11 '12 at 0:00
    
@Eli, a better solution is: var curr_hour = d.getHours() % 12; –  Fydo Feb 22 '13 at 17:00
    
@Fydo, won't that return 0 hours for noon? –  grantwparks Mar 6 '13 at 20:16
function twoDigitPad(number) { 
    return ("0" + number).slice(-2);
}

function twelveHourTimeString() {
    var date = new Date();
    var hour = date.getHours();
    var min = twoDigitPad(date.getMinutes());
    var sec = twoDigitPad(date.getSeconds());
    var ampm = hour < 12 ? "am" : "pm";
    hour = hour % 12 || 12;  // convert to 12-hour format
    return hour + ":" + min + ":" + sec + " " + ampm;
}

date.getHours() returns an integer between 0 and 23, which hour % 12 || 12 converts to the 12-hour format.

date.getMinutes() and date.getSeconds() each return an integer, so you'll need to zero-pad those values when they're less than 10. Optionally, hour as well.

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Dealing with dates reliably cross-browser is a ball-ache in javascript- I would use the DateFormat library; http://blog.stevenlevithan.com/archives/date-time-format

then as he notes on the page, you can call it like so; dateFormat(now, "h:MM:ss TT");

There are a few alternatives, but this one seems the most light-weight.

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Sorry, But i cannot use external. else we have so many options –  Vinit Prajapati Jan 27 '12 at 10:22

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