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Given a string, figure out how many characters minimum are needed to make the word a palindrome. Examples:

ABBA : 0 (already a palindrome)
ABB: 1
FAE: 2
FOO: 1
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8  
Is this homework? If so, can you please mark it as such? –  Curt Sampson May 24 '09 at 5:54
1  
Please clarify: are characters added to the end, or (as in a competition problem I once faced) are can they be added anywhere in the string? –  Artelius May 24 '09 at 6:55
4  
Someday, someone will desperately need help with their palindrome-related commercial application. Everyone is going to respond with cries of "this is homework!" Ok, probably not. –  Brian May 24 '09 at 9:20
1  
Sorry, it is not homework. It is an interview question I was asked 2 years ago and I thought it might be interesting to post it to see how others solved it compared to how I did. –  Raymond May 24 '09 at 17:16
1  
May I ask, did you get the job? –  ThePower Jul 31 '09 at 6:51

10 Answers 10

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Algorithms only, since this is probably homework [Apologies to Raymond, it's an interview question rather than homework, as his edits/comments make clear. However, the algorithms and added pseudo-code are still valid for that purpose, and I've added some C code at the end].

You need to find the longest palindrome at the end of the string. An algorithm to see if a string is a palindrome can be created by simply running one pointer from the start of the string and one from the end, checking that the characters they refer to are identical, until they meet in the middle. Something like:

function isPalindrome(s):
    i1 = 0
    i2 = s.length() - 1
    while i2 > i1:
        if s.char_at(i1) not equal to s.char_at(i2):
            return false
        increment i1
        decrement i2
    return true

Try that with the full string. If that doesn't work, save the first character on a stack then see if the remaining characters form a palindrome. If that doesn't work, save the second character as well and check again from the third character onwards.

Eventually you'll end up with a series of saved characters and the remaining string which is a palindrome.

Best case is if the original string was a palindrome in which case the stack will be empty. Worst case is one character left (a one-character string is automatically a palindrome) and all the others on the stack.

The number of characters you need to add to the end of the original string is the number of characters on the stack.

To actually make the palindrome, pop the characters off the stack one-by-one and put them at the start and the end of the palindromic string.

Examples:

String      Palindrome  Stack  Notes
------      ----------  -----  -----
ABBA            Y       -      no characters needed.

String      Palindrome  Stack  Notes
------      ----------  -----  -----
ABB             N       -
BB              Y       A      one character needed.
ABBA            Y       -      start popping, finished.

String      Palindrome  Stack  Notes
------      ----------  -----  -----
FAE             N       -
AE              N       F
E               Y       AF     two characters needed.
AEA             Y       F      start popping.
FAEAF           Y       -      finished.

String      Palindrome  Stack  Notes
------      ----------  -----  -----
FOO             N       -
OO              Y       F      one character needed.
FOOF            Y       -      start popping, finished.

String      Palindrome  Stack  Notes
------      ----------  -----  -----
HAVANNA         N       -
AVANNA          N       H
VANNA           N       AH
ANNA            Y       VAH    three characters needed.
VANNAV          Y       AH     start popping.
AVANNAVA        Y       H
HAVANNAVAH      Y       -      finished.

 

String          Palindrome   Stack      Notes
------          ----------   --------   -----
deoxyribo           N        -
eoxyribo            N        d
oxyribo             N        ed
:                   :        :
bo                  N        iryxoed
o                   Y        biryxoed   eight chars needed.
bob                 Y        iryxoed    start popping.
ibobi               Y        ryxoed
:                   :        :
oxyribobiryxo       Y        ed
eoxyribobiryxoe     Y        d
deoxyribobiryxoed   Y        -          finished.

Converting this method to "code":

function evalString(s):
    stack = ""
    while not isPalindrome(s):
        stack = s.char_at(0) + stack
        s = s.substring(1)
    print "Need " + s.length() + " character(s) to make palindrome."
    while stack not equal to "":
        s = stack.char_at(0) + s + stack.char_at(0)
        stack = stack.substring(1)
    print "Palindrome is " + s + "."

For those less interested in pseudo-code, here's a test program in C which does the trick.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

static char *chkMem (char *chkStr) {
    if (chkStr == NULL) {
        fprintf (stderr, "Out of memory.\n");
        exit (1);
    }
    return chkStr;
}

static char *makeStr (char *oldStr) {
    char *newStr = chkMem (malloc (strlen (oldStr) + 1));
    return strcpy (newStr, oldStr);
}

static char *stripFirst (char *oldStr) {
    char *newStr = chkMem (malloc (strlen (oldStr)));
    strcpy (newStr, &(oldStr[1]));
    free (oldStr);
    return newStr;
}

static char *addFront (char *oldStr, char addChr) {
    char *newStr = chkMem (malloc (strlen (oldStr) + 2));
    sprintf (newStr, "%c%s", addChr, oldStr);
    free (oldStr);
    return newStr;
}

 

static char *addBoth (char *oldStr, char addChr) {
    char *newStr = chkMem (malloc (strlen (oldStr) + 3));
    sprintf (newStr, "%c%s%c", addChr, oldStr, addChr);
    free (oldStr);
    return newStr;
}

static int isPalindrome (char *chkStr) {
    int i1 = 0;
    int i2 = strlen (chkStr) - 1;
    while (i2 > i1)
        if (chkStr[i1++] != chkStr[i2--])
            return 0;
    return 1;
}

 

static void evalString (char *chkStr) {
    char * stack = makeStr ("");
    char * word = makeStr (chkStr);

    while (!isPalindrome (word)) {
        printf ("%s: no, ", word);
        stack = addFront (stack, *word);
        word = stripFirst (word);
        printf ("stack <- %s, word <- %s\n", stack, word);
    }
    printf ("%s: yes, need %d character(s)\n", word, strlen (stack));

    printf ("----------------------------------------\n");
    printf ("Adjusting to make palindrome:\n");
    while (strlen (stack) > 0) {
        printf ("   %s, stack <- %s\n", word, stack);
    word = addBoth (word, *stack);
    stack = stripFirst (stack);
    }
    printf ("   %s\n", word);
    printf ("========================================\n");

    free (word);
    free (stack);
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int i;
    for (i = 1; i < argc; i++) evalString (argv[i]);
    return 0;
}

Running this with:

mkpalin abb abba fae foo deoxyribo

gives the output:

abb: no, stack <- a, word <- bb
bb: yes, need 1 character(s)
----------------------------------------
Adjusting to make palindrome:
   bb, stack <- a
   abba
========================================

 

abba: yes, need 0 character(s)
----------------------------------------
Adjusting to make palindrome:
   abba
========================================

 

fae: no, stack <- f, word <- ae
ae: no, stack <- af, word <- e
e: yes, need 2 character(s)
----------------------------------------
Adjusting to make palindrome:
   e, stack <- af
   aea, stack <- f
   faeaf
========================================

 

foo: no, stack <- f, word <- oo
oo: yes, need 1 character(s)
----------------------------------------
Adjusting to make palindrome:
   oo, stack <- f
   foof
========================================

 

deoxyribo: no, stack <- d, word <- eoxyribo
eoxyribo: no, stack <- ed, word <- oxyribo
oxyribo: no, stack <- oed, word <- xyribo
xyribo: no, stack <- xoed, word <- yribo
yribo: no, stack <- yxoed, word <- ribo
ribo: no, stack <- ryxoed, word <- ibo
ibo: no, stack <- iryxoed, word <- bo
bo: no, stack <- biryxoed, word <- o
o: yes, need 8 character(s)
----------------------------------------
Adjusting to make palindrome:
   o, stack <- biryxoed
   bob, stack <- iryxoed
   ibobi, stack <- ryxoed
   ribobir, stack <- yxoed
   yribobiry, stack <- xoed
   xyribobiryx, stack <- oed
   oxyribobiryxo, stack <- ed
   eoxyribobiryxoe, stack <- d
   deoxyribobiryxoed
========================================
share|improve this answer
4  
@Pax, Terrific answer. –  Simucal May 24 '09 at 17:32
    
great explanation.. –  Barry Nov 15 '11 at 3:27

I saw this question in a competition once. I was stumped then.

But i think i've gotten this after discussing it with my friends. The thing is to find the minimum characters to insert into a string, you need to find the longest palindrome its centered around.

Take the string "accaz"

Imagine the string accaz is the palindrome acca with z inserted at the end. So we need to add another z at the start. Another string :"mykma"

Imagine this to be mym with two characters k and a inserted into it. So we need to two more characters to make it a palindrome. (the palindrome would be amkykma).

I've written a program in Java implementing this.

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;
public class MinPalin{

//Function to check if a string is palindrome
public boolean isPaindrome(String s){
    int beg=0;
    int end=s.length()-1;

    while(beg<end){
        if(s.charAt(beg)!=s.charAt(end)){
            return false;

        }
        beg++;
        end--;
    }

    return true;

}

public int MinInsert(String s){
    int min=0;
    if(isPaindrome(s)){
        return min;
    }

    min++;

    while(true){
        ArrayList<String> temp=comboes(s,min);
        if(hasPalindrome(temp)){
            return min;
        }
        else
            min++;
    }

}

/*
 * Returns an arraylist of strings, in which n characters are removed
* 
*/

public ArrayList<String> comboes(String s,int n){

    ArrayList<String> results=new ArrayList<String>();


    if(n==1){

        for(int i=0;i<s.length();i++){
            String text="";
            for(int j=0;j<s.length();j++){
                if(i!=j){

                    text=text+""+s.charAt(j);
                }


            }
            results.add(text);

        }

    }
    else{
        ArrayList<String> temp=new ArrayList<String>();

        for(int i=0;i<s.length();i++){
            String tempString="";
            for(int j=0;j<s.length();j++){
                if(i!=j){
                    tempString=tempString+s.charAt(j);
                }
            }
            temp=comboes(tempString, n-1);

            for(int j=0;j<temp.size();j++){
                results.add(""+temp.get(j));
            }
        }
    }

    return results;


}

public boolean hasPalindrome(ArrayList<String> text){
    for(String temp:text){
        if(isPaindrome(temp)){
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

public static void main(String[] args)throws IOException
 {
     System.out.println("Enter the word :");
     MinPalin obj=new MinPalin();
     BufferedReader r=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
     int n=obj.MinInsert(r.readLine());
     System.out.println("Characters needed : "+n);
    }
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

simply

static int GetNumForPalindrome(string str)
    {
        int count = 0;
        for (int start = 0, end = str.Length - 1; start < end; ++start)
        {
            if (str[start] != str[end])
                ++count;
            else --end;
        }
        return count;
    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        while (true)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(GetNumForPalindrome(Console.ReadLine()).ToString());

        }

    }
share|improve this answer
    
What about input "baob"? I need 3 characters to make a palindrome. Your program will do this: str[0] == 'b' == str[3] -> start == 1, end == 2-> str[1] == 'a', str[2] == 'o' -> count == 1, start == 2, end == 2 -> returns 1. –  Krab Apr 19 '11 at 15:27

This is like finding the edit distance between two strings, which is a standard dynamic programming problem. You know the length of the string so split the string into half. You need to find the least number of characters to add to transform one string to another. Modified Edit Distance Algorithms are now available.

Using this algorithm, you can solve the problem in O(n^2).

share|improve this answer
    
I didnt expect the downvote. –  unj2 May 25 '09 at 0:49
    
You probably got the downvote because your original answer said your O(n^2) algorithm kicked a** compared to the other answers. Despite that complexity not really being a bragging point, quite a few of the others also have similar complexity. It's rarely a good idea to dis other peoples answers. Point out their flaws if you must but make sure you're humble (and right). –  paxdiablo May 25 '09 at 3:33
    
Sorry. I did realise that the comment sounded stupid. –  unj2 May 25 '09 at 4:13

python solution:

import math

def isPalindrome(s):
    return s[:len(s)/2] == s[int(math.ceil(len(s)/2.0)):][::-1]

def numPalindrome(s):
    for i in range(len(s)):
        if isPalindrome(s[:len(s) - i]) or isPalindrome(s[i:]):
            return i
share|improve this answer

I think an easier solution would be to find the beginning of the sub palindrome in the string, moving char by char.

void makePalindrome(const char* str)
{
    int len = strlen(str);
    int fp=0, bp=len-1, begin=0, end=bp;
    // fp and bp are used to look for matches.
    // begin and end represent the begin and end of a possible sub palindrome
    while(fp < bp)
    {
        if(str[fp] == str[bp])
        {
            fp++;             //move back and front pointers.
            bp--;
        }
        else{
            if(bp == end)     //If no match found yet, just move forward.
            {
                fp++;
                begin++;
            }
            else 
            {
                begin++;      //Since begin isn't feasible, move begin forward
                fp = begin;   //Reset fp and bp to their respective positions.
                bp = end;
            }
        }
    }
    int minLenPal = len + begin; //Minimum Length of Palindrome
    char a[minLenPal+1];        

    {   //Build the Palindrome a
        strcpy(a,str);
        for(int i = 0; i< begin; i++) 
            a[minLenPal-i-1] = str[i];
        a[minLenPal] ='\0';
    }

    cout<<"For String "<<str<<", minimum characters to be added is "
        <<begin<<". Palindrome is "<<a<<endl;
}

This is my first post so please edit out any formatting mistakes.

share|improve this answer

make a function that accepts a string and a number n and then tries to make the string into a palindrome by adding n additional characters..
for n=0.. do nothing
for n=1.. append the first char .. and so on
run this function from n=0 to the length of the intial string..
the first number n for which it returns success.. thats your answer

share|improve this answer
    
This will work, but it is asymptotically worse than Pax's algorithm. –  Brian May 24 '09 at 9:16

In addition to Pax's response. You can use linear time Manacher's algorithm described in "Jewels of stringology" to compute radiuses of palindromes within text. Using that you can easily compute the length of the longest palindrome at the end of the text in linear time. I think this speeds up Pax's algorithm to linear time.

EDIT:

Pax's algorithm works on assumption you can only add characters at the end of the string. Try it with BAAABAAB, you'll get BAAABAABAAAB, but you can turn it into BAABABAAB with one insertion or BAABAAABAAB if if you can only add at the end or the beginning.

share|improve this answer

Here's my 2 cents. May not be the fastest, but it is terse and simple to follow if you're into Lambdas.

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string pal = "ABB";
        Console.WriteLine(minPallyChars(pal).ToString());
    }

    static int minPallyChars(string pal)
    {
        return Enumerable.Range(0, pal.Length).First(x => IsPally(pal + ReverseStr(pal.Substring(0, x))));
    }

    static bool IsPally(string value)
    {
        return value == ReverseStr(value);
    }
    public static string ReverseStr(string value)
    {
        return new string(value.Reverse().ToArray());
    }
share|improve this answer
#include <iostream>
#include<string.h>
    using namespace std;
    int f(char t[],int i,int j)
    {
        int c1=0,c2=0,c3=0;
        int r;
        if(i<j)
        {
            if(t[i]==t[j])
            {
                c3=f(t,i+1,j-1);
                cout<<"3 "<<c3<<"\n";
                return c3;
            }
            else
            {
                c1=f(t,i+1,j);
                cout<<"c1 "<<c1<<"\n";
                c2=f(t,i,j-1);
            cout<<"c2 "<<c2<<"\n";
            if(c1<c2)
            {
                c1++;
                cout<<"1 "<<c1<<"\n";
                return c1;
            }
            if(c2<c1)
            {
                c2++;
                cout<<"2 "<<c2<<"\n";
                return c2;
            }
            if(c1==c2)
            {
                c1++;
                c2++;
                cout<<"4 "<<c1<<"\n";
                return c1;
            }
        }
    }
    if(i>=j)
    {
        cout<<"5 "<<c1<<"\n";
        return c1;
    }
}
int main()
{
    int i,j,c=0,n=0;
    char s[10];
    cout<<"enter the string";
    cin>>s;
    for(i=0;s[i]!='\0';i++)
        n++;
    i=0;
    j=n-1;
    c=f(s,i,j);
    cout<<c;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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