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I have a CSV file which contains a mixture of English and Chinese characters (it is a list of contacts exported from the Mozilla Thunderbird email program). I am trying to create a function which can extract the information from this file. It appears that function fgetcsv() does not support multibyte characters. Since I am running PHP5.2, I do not have access to str_getcsv().

Although the situation above refers to English and Chinese, I am looking for a solution which will work with any language.

Right now I have the function namecards_import_str_getcsv() as my CSV parsing function, which tries to mimic str_getcsv().

function namecards_import_str_getcsv($input, $delimiter = ',', $enclosure = '"', $escape = '\\', $eol = '\n') {
  if (!function_exists('str_getcsv')) {
    if (is_string($input) && !empty($input)) {
      $output = array();
      $tmp    = preg_split("/".$eol."/",$input);
      if (is_array($tmp) && !empty($tmp)) {
        while (list($line_num, $line) = each($tmp)) {
          if (preg_match("/" . $escape . $enclosure . "/", $line)) {
            while ($strlen = strlen($line)) {
              $pos_delimiter = strpos($line, $delimiter);
              $pos_enclosure_start = strpos($line, $enclosure);
              if (is_int($pos_delimiter) && is_int($pos_enclosure_start) && ($pos_enclosure_start < $pos_delimiter)) {
                $enclosed_str = substr($line, 1);
                $pos_enclosure_end = strpos($enclosed_str, $enclosure);
                $enclosed_str = substr($enclosed_str, 0, $pos_enclosure_end);
                $output[$line_num][] = $enclosed_str;
                $offset = $pos_enclosure_end + 3;
              } 
              else {
                if (empty($pos_delimiter) && empty($pos_enclosure_start)) {
                  $output[$line_num][] = substr($line, 0);
                  $offset = strlen($line);
                } 
                else {
                  $output[$line_num][] = substr($line,0,$pos_delimiter);
                  $offset = (!empty($pos_enclosure_start) && ($pos_enclosure_start < $pos_delimiter))? $pos_enclosure_start : $pos_delimiter + 1;
                }
              }
              $line = substr($line,$offset);
            }
          } 
          else {
            $line = preg_split("/" . $delimiter . "/", $line);

            /*
             * Validating against pesky extra line breaks creating false rows.
            */
            if (is_array($line) && !empty($line[0])) {
              $output[$line_num] = $line;
            }
          }
        }
        return $output;
      } 
      else {
        return false;
      }
    } 
    else {
      return false;
    }
  }
  else {
    return str_getcsv($input);
  }
}

This function is called by the following line of code:

  $file = $_SESSION['namecards_csv_file'];

  if (file_exists($file->uri)) {
    // Load raw csv content into a handler variable.
    $handle = fopen($file->uri, "r");
    $cardinfo = array();
    while (($data = fgets($handle)) !== FALSE) {
      $data = namecards_import_str_getcsv($data);
      dsm($data);
      $cardinfo[] = $data[0];
    }
    fclose($handle);
  }
  else {
    drupal_set_message(t('CSV file doesn\'t exist'), 'error');
  }

In the array of results the strings of Chinese characters are in the correct place in the array by they appear as symbols e.g. "��".

Another method I had tried before this was to simply use fgetcsv() (See below example). But in this case the elements of the returned array were empty.

$file = $_SESSION['namecards_csv_file'];

if (file_exists($file->uri)) {
  // Load raw csv content into a handler variable.
  $handle = fopen($file->uri, "r");
  $cardinfo = array();
  while (($data = fgetcsv($handle, 5000, ",")) !== FALSE) {
    dsm($data);
    $cardinfo[] = $data;
  }
  fclose($handle);
}
else {
  drupal_set_message(t('CSV file doesn\'t exist'), 'error');
}

In case you are interested here is the contents of the CSV file:

First Name,Last Name,Display Name,Nickname,Primary Email,Secondary Email,Screen Name,Work Phone,Home Phone,Fax Number,Pager Number,Mobile Number,Home Address,Home Address 2,Home City,Home State,Home ZipCode,Home Country,Work Address,Work Address 2,Work City,Work State,Work ZipCode,Work Country,Job Title,Department,Organization,Web Page 1,Web Page 2,Birth Year,Birth Month,Birth Day,Custom 1,Custom 2,Custom 3,Custom 4,Notes,
Ben,Gunn,Ben Gunn,Benny,ben1@asdf.com,ben2@asdf.com,,+94 (10) 11111111,+94 (10) 22222222,+94 (10) 33333333,,+94 44444444444,12 Benny Lane,,Beijing,Beijing,100028,China,13 asdfsdfs,,sdfsf,sdfsdf,134323,China,Manager,Sales,Benny Inc,,,,,,,,,,,
乔,康,乔 康,小康,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,北京市朝阳区,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
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2  
As far as I can see, fgetcsv() should support multibyte characters. What makes you think it doesn't? Are you sure the problem isn't elsewhere? –  Pekka 웃 Jan 27 '12 at 10:52
1  
@Pekka fgetcsv() checks for separators on a byte basis, so if the separator byte can be part of a multibyte sequence things start to break. –  Eugen Rieck Jan 27 '12 at 10:56
2  
@Eugen ahh, you're right. But a multi-byte byte matching a single-byte byte shouldn't happen, at least not in UTF-8, should it? The only thing that would be a no-no in UTF-8 is a multi-byte separator (Edit: ahh, I guess it can happen in the second byte, you're right. I withdraw my statement.) –  Pekka 웃 Jan 27 '12 at 10:58
1  
Please define what your actual problem is, what "not working" means. I have used fgetcsv just fine with UTF-8 encoded files in the past. –  deceze Jan 27 '12 at 11:00
1  
@Pekka the second byte was exactly what I meant: splitting there will leave you with a first part, that is invalid on the multibyte stream level and both parts being invalid on a business logic level –  Eugen Rieck Jan 27 '12 at 11:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just writing up as an answer what was figured out in the comments:

fgetcsv is locale sensitive, so make sure to setlocale to a UTF-8 locale.

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