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I have a list and I need two sections in each item. I also need the first section to be of fixed width. How should I code it?

I've tried using definition lists:

    <dl>
      <dt style="width: 2em;">foo</dt><dd>bar</dd>
    ...

    </dl>

... and user lists with span:

    <ul>
      <li><span style="width: 2em;">foo<span>bar</li>
    ...

    </ul>

Neither worked. Are there any canonical ways to do that?

share|improve this question
    
They're not... "user" list, but "unordered" :s –  Tordek May 24 '09 at 7:14
    
@Tordek: Oops, my guess misled me here. –  Alex May 24 '09 at 9:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The way I came up with is, perhaps, not canonical (but only because I'm not convinced that there is a 'canonical' means of implementing it), but it does work:

    <style type="text/css" media="screen">

    	#container
    		{width: 50%;
    		margin: 0 auto;
    		}

    	ol,
    	ul	{border: 1px solid #ccc;
    		width: 90%;
    		padding: 1.4em 0;
    		}

    	ol li,
    	ul li	{background-color: #ccc;
    		margin-left: 20%;
    		}

    	ol li span.list-head,
    	ul li span.list-head
    		{background-color: #ffa;
    		float: left;
    		display: block;
    		width: 6em;
    		}

    	dl	{border: 1px solid #ccc;
    		line-height: 1.4em;
    		padding: 1.4em 0 0 0;
    		}

    	dl dt	{background-color: #ffa;
    		display: block;
    		margin: 0;
    		width: 10%;
    		}

    	dl dd	{background-color: #fc0;
    		display: block;
    		margin: 0;
    		width: 88%;
    		margin-left: 11%;
    		position: relative;
    		top: -1.4em;
    		}		

    </style>
...
    <div id="container">

    	<ol>

    		<li><span class="list-head">Foo:</span> bar.</li>

    		<li><span class="list-head">Bar:</span> baz.</li>

    		<li><span class="list-head">Baz:</span> foo.</li>

    	</ol>

    	<ul>

    		<li><span class="list-head">Foo:</span> bar.</li>

    		<li><span class="list-head">Bar:</span> baz.</li>

    		<li><span class="list-head">Baz:</span> foo.</li>

    	</ul>

    	<dl>

    		<dt>Foo:</dt>
    		<dd>bar.</dd>

    		<dt>Bar:</dt>
    		<dd>baz.</dd>

    		<dt>Baz:</dt>
    		<dd>foo.</dd>

    	</dl>

    </div>

There's a working demo over at: http://www.davidrhysthomas.co.uk/so/lists.html.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's a very nice tutorial :) –  Alex May 24 '09 at 11:54
    
Why, thank you =] –  David Thomas May 24 '09 at 12:06

Width does not apply to <span> tags as they are inline. Try replacing the tag with a <div> or <p> or any other block element.

share|improve this answer

Like Alan said but if you just put a div it won't work the way you want, try this:

<ul>
  <li><div style="width: 200px; display: inline-block;">foo</div>bar</li>
  <li><div style="width: 200px; display: inline-block;">foo12</div>bar</li>
  <li><div style="width: 200px; display: inline-block;">foo12345</div>bar</li>
  <li><div style="width: 200px; display: inline-block;">foo12345678</div>bar</li>
</ul>

(maybe you'd like to use a class instead of repeating the style attribute each list item)

share|improve this answer
    
I never knew there existed an inline-block. Thanks. :-) –  Alan Haggai Alavi May 24 '09 at 7:20
    
@Victor: Thanks, but inline-block works only in Firefox. Do you know how I can make it work in IE? Seems like IE simply does not understand this property. –  Alex May 24 '09 at 9:21
    
@Alex: Sorry, I was afraid of that but I can't test IE cuz I don't have Windows installed. Maybe when IE implements the standards :( –  victor hugo May 24 '09 at 16:22

try either a label for the first portion or an inline div

share|improve this answer

Use a dl and float the dt to the left.

<style type="text/css">
dt {clear:left; float:left; width: 8em;}
</style>

<dl>
     <dt>foo<dt>
     <dd>bar</dd>
     <dt>foo1<dt>
     <dd>bar1</dd>
     <dt>foo12345<dt>
     <dd>bar</dd>
 </dl>
share|improve this answer

I'd like to ask: is this for representing tabular data? We've been indoctrinated into thinking that HTML tables are evil, but for showing, well, a table of data, they're perfect. I've seen more than one coder try and duplicate the functionality of the <table> tag using <div>s and CSS.

Of course, if it's not, then please, carry on. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Of course the data in my case could be put into tables instead. I abide by a list policy since lists are better for SEO. –  Alex May 24 '09 at 16:08

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