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In a local scope (like a function), given these 4 examples:

(1)

int x;
int y;
// code...
x = 4;
y = 5;

(2)

int x = 4;
int y = 5;
// code...

(3)

// code...
int x = 4;
// code...
int y = 5;

(4)

// any other possibility

There is some performance difference in the form I declare and initiate my variables, Or compile take track of that for me?

Edit

I'm asking because I have read often that its better to put all declarations at the most first lines that would be better for performance. Like:

func(){
    int x,y,z,w;
    long bla,ble;
    MYTYPE weeee;
    // more declarations..
    //code..
}

But I didnt know why.

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You canot do #3 in C, only in C++. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 27 '12 at 11:24
    
If there is any difference in performance, it would probably be to small to measure, which means you can use whatever method you think looks best or think is more readable. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 27 '12 at 11:25
5  
@dasblinkenlight As of C99, you really can. –  unwind Jan 27 '12 at 11:25
    
@unwind Oops, I guess I've been out of C programming for too long :( Thanks! –  dasblinkenlight Jan 27 '12 at 11:28
    
@dasblinkenlight Also, 3) was introduced in C at the same time as // comments. In traditional C code (C90), none of this would have compiled. –  Lundin Jan 27 '12 at 12:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm asking because I have read often that its better to put all declarations at the most first lines that would be better for performance.

I can ensure you that this is pure nonsense. People making such statements have no idea whatsoever how C code is translated into machine code.

I would be very surprised if any of your 3 examples gave different machine code.


However there exists a special case: had the variables been declared as "globals" or static, then they would have static storage duration. And then they would be initialized before main() is called. All globals/statics that aren't explicitly initialized by the programmer, are set to zero. So in that case, your example 1) would have been slower:

int x; /* global variable, no explicit init so it will get set to 
          zero before main() is called */
...
x = 4; // variable gets set a second time, elsewhere, in "runtime"

is slower than

int x = 4; // global variable, gets initialized before main() is called

The performance difference between these two is however likely just one CPU instruction, so in 99.9% of all applications it won't matter.

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C says nothing about performances.

(C99, 5.1.2.3p1) "The semantic descriptions in this International Standard describe the behavior of an abstract machine in which issues of optimization are irrelevant."

This is implementation dependent but any good compiler will likely produce the same code.

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If none of the // code blocks touch x and y, it is highly unlikely that you would encounter a perceptible performance difference between these options.

If you want to know for sure what happens on your hardware architecture using your compiler, you could always benchmark the code and/or examine the generated assembly.

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+1 for looking at the assembly output. I think most profilers would struggle at this level of granularity, so for benchmarking you're talking about really big loops. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 27 '12 at 12:06

1) There would be -- in debug. The compiler should take care of you in release.

2) You might favor this for readability. The compiler could 'erase' a constant value altogether.

3) This can make a difference. Local declarations are often best, but that is more important in C++ where actual constructors do some work. Sometimes, you may measure a difference if a large object is pulled out of a loop (but your compiler should do that for you).

I'm asking because I have read often that its better to put all declarations at the most first lines that would be better for performance.

Not so. I figure that idea just comes from language restrictions of yesteryear. Anyways, "As local as possible" is regularly best. Of course, this can vary depending on the compiler, hardware, implementations, and so on.

In C, stack allocation and initialization is trivial, and your compiler should handle this well enough that performance is not a concern in most cases.

Try some real world benchmarking and profiling. Looking at the asm (as Aix stated) can also help.

If you don't go as far writing assembly and you don't do daily profiling and this is strictly C, it's not worth changing how you write.

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I'm asking because I have read often that it's better to put all declarations at the most first lines that would be better for performance. Like:

func(){
    int x,y,z,w;
    long bla,ble;
    MYTYPE weeee;
    // more declarations..
    //code..
}

No, the only reason for doing this is that in early C you had to put all declarations before the code in a function.

That rule was changed at the end of the last century.

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No universally predictable performance difference.

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If the compiler is really dumb, the 2nd form is the best. Else, it will optimize the other forms to it.

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Why? It doesn't make sense. Can you give an example of any dumb compiler in history where the 2nd example resulted in faster machine code? –  Lundin Jan 27 '12 at 12:39
    
I'm don't know about historical compiler, but I guess that the first code will make something like sub rsp,8 ... mov [rsp+4],4 mov [rsp],5 , while the second will make something like push 0x00040005 –  asaelr Jan 27 '12 at 12:55
    
I doubt that. I think either case will result in the 4, 5 values getting stored directly either in CPU registers or on the stack. –  Lundin Jan 27 '12 at 15:12

In C, i don't think it will make any difference. In C++ (not the asked question i know), you get substantial differences based on whether constructors are called, and if the temporary object is declared inside a loop, how many times they are called.

In C99, I'm not sure if late declarations allocate stack space as the function is entered, or as the block is entered. This would have similar, albeit minor, performance implications which the optimizer should handle. As per Aix's answer, a good approach is to look at the assembler to see what's happening under the hood,

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