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This came to my mind after I learned the following from this question:

where T : struct

We, C# developers, all know the basics of C#. I mean declarations, conditionals, loops, operators, etc.

Some of us even mastered the stuff like Generics, anonymous types, lambdas, LINQ, ...

But what are the most hidden features or tricks of C# that even C# fans, addicts, experts barely know?

Here are the revealed features so far:


Keywords

Attributes

Syntax

Language Features

Visual Studio Features

Framework

Methods and Properties

Tips & Tricks

  • Nice method for event handlers by Andreas H.R. Nilsson
  • Uppercase comparisons by John
  • Access anonymous types without reflection by dp
  • A quick way to lazily instantiate collection properties by Will
  • JavaScript-like anonymous inline-functions by roosteronacid

Other

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296 Answers 296

One feature that I only learned about here on Stack Overflow was the ability to set an attribute on the return parameter.

[AttributeUsage( AttributeTargets.ReturnValue )]
public class CuriosityAttribute:Attribute
{
}

public class Bar
{
    [return: Curiosity]
    public Bar ReturnANewBar()
    {
        return new Bar();
    }
}

This was truly a hidden feature for me :-)

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3  
It applies Curiosity as an attribute to the returned instance. –  Mihai Lazar Mar 25 '09 at 17:56

When a class implements INotifyPropertyChanged and you want to inform the binding system (WPF, Silverlight, etc.) that multiple bound properties of an object (ViewModel) have changed you can raise the PropertyChanged-Event with null or String.Empty.

This is documented in MSDN, but code examples and articles often don´t explain this possibility. I found it very useful.

public class BoundObject : INotifyPropertyChanged {

    private int _value;
    private string _text;

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public int Value {
        get {
            return _value;
        }
        set {
            if (_value != value) {
                _value = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Value");
            }
        }
    }

    public string Text {
        get {
            return _text;
        }
        set {
            if (_text != value) {
                _text = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Text");
            }
        }
    }

    public void Init(){
        _text = "InitialValue";
        _value = 1;
        OnPropertyChanged(string.Empty);
    }

    public void Reset() {
        _text = "DefaultValue";
        _value = 0;
        OnPropertyChanged(string.Empty);
    }

    private void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName) {
        PropertyChangedEventArgs e = new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName);

        if (PropertyChanged != null) {
            PropertyChanged(this, e);
        }
    }
}
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You can put several attributes in one pair of square brackets:

    [OperationContract, ServiceKnownType(typeof(Prism)), ServiceKnownType(typeof(Cuboid))]
    Shape GetShape();
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1  
I hate it when CodeAnalysis puts it SuppressMessage attribute inside other attributes... For me I like to allign all attributes. –  riezebosch Sep 27 '11 at 13:32

I didn't start to really appreciate the "using" blocks until recently. They make things so much more tidy :)

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Lambda Expressions

Func<int, int, int> add = (a, b) => (a + b);

Obscure String Formats

Console.WriteLine("{0:D10}", 2); // 0000000002

Dictionary<string, string> dict = new Dictionary<string, string> { 
    {"David", "C#"}, 
    {"Johann", "Perl"}, 
    {"Morgan", "Python"}
};

Console.WriteLine( "{0,10} {1, 10}", "Programmer", "Language" );

Console.WriteLine( "-".PadRight( 21, '-' ) );

foreach (string key in dict.Keys)
{
    Console.WriteLine( "{0, 10} {1, 10}", key, dict[key] );				
}
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I'm becoming a big fan of extension methods since they can add much wanted functionality to existing code or code you can't edit. One of my favorites I add in to everything I do now is for string.IsNullOrEmpty()

public static class Strings
{
    public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(this string value)
    {
        return string.IsNullOrEmpty(value);
    }
}

This lets you shorten your code a bit like this

var input = Console.ReadLine();
if (input.IsNullOrEmpty())
{
    Console.WriteLine("try again");
}
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1  
I hope you realize that this example is impossible, because IsNullOrEmpty is already a member of the type string. Extension methods can not have the same name as any member (static or non-static) of that type, which it extends. –  John Leidegren Aug 5 '09 at 17:05
3  
I'm using this in 2 projects for work right now plus numerous personal projects. I put the IsNullOrEmpty method inside of a class called Strings along with my other extension methods for the string class. I haven't had any issue with the compiler telling me the method name is invalid and have been using it in my code for 3 or 4 months now. –  Brian Surowiec Aug 12 '09 at 4:00
3  
@John: I tried Brian's code, it works. –  redtuna Aug 14 '09 at 13:01
2  
@John I think it works because the original IsNullOrEmpty take one parameter and not this one. So it's just overloading. –  Julien N Jun 22 '10 at 15:46
1  
@Julien N - Ah, right you are. I do write this kind of code, but I just call it IsEmpty and I have another IsNonEmpty, I personally don't like the ! operator much. –  John Leidegren Jun 22 '10 at 17:41

What about using this:

#if DEBUG
            Console.Write("Debugging");
#else
            Console.Write("Final");
#endif

When you have your solution compiled with DEBUG defined it will output "Debugging".

If your compile is set to Release it will write "Final".

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FlagsAttribute, a small but nice feature when using enum to make a bitmasks:

[Flags]
public enum ConfigOptions
{
    None    = 0,
    A       = 1 << 0,
    B       = 1 << 1,
    Both    = A | B
}

Console.WriteLine( ConfigOptions.A.ToString() );
Console.WriteLine( ConfigOptions.Both.ToString() );
// Will print:
// A
// A, B
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1  
+1 for explicitely showcasing the ToString() behaviour for combined flags –  sehe Mar 23 '11 at 23:15

Type-inference for factory methods

I don't know if this has been posted already (I scanned the first post, couldn't find it).

This is best shown with an example, assuming you have this class (to simulate a tuple), in in an attempt to demonstrate all the language features that make this possible I will go through it step by step.

public class Tuple<V1, V2> : Tuple
{
    public readonly V1 v1;
    public readonly V2 v2;

    public Tuple(V1 v1, V2 v2)
    {
      this.v1 = v1;
      this.v2 = v2;
    }
}

Everyone knows how to create an instance of it, such as:

Tuple<int, string> tup = new Tuple<int, string>(1, "Hello, World!");

Not exactly rocket science, now we can of course change the type declaration of the variable to var, like this:

var tup = new Tuple<int, string>(1, "Hello, World!");

Still well known, to digress a bit here's a static method with type parameters, which everyone should be familiar with:

public static void Create<T1, T2>()
{
    // stuff
}

Calling it is, again common knowledge, done like this:

Create<float, double>();

What most people don't know is that if the arguments to the generic method contains all the types it requires they can be inferred, for example:

public static void Create<T1, T2>(T1 a, T2 b)
{
    // stuff
}

These two calls are identical:

Create<float, string>(1.0f, "test");
Create(1.0f, "test");

Since T1 and T2 is inferred from the arguments you passed. Combining this knowledge with the var keyword, we can by adding a second static class with a static method, such as:

public abstract class Tuple
{
    public static Tuple<V1, V2> Create<V1, V2>(V1 v1, V2 v2)
    {
        return new Tuple<V1, V2>(v1, v2);
    }
}

Achieve this effect:

var tup = Tuple.Create(1, "Hello, World!");

This means that the types of the: variable "tup", the type-parameters of "Create" and the return value of "Create" are all inferred from the types you pass as arguments to Create

The full code looks something like this:

public abstract class Tuple
{
    public static Tuple<V1, V2> Create<V1, V2>(V1 v1, V2 v2)
    {
        return new Tuple<V1, V2>(v1, v2);
    }
}

public class Tuple<V1, V2> : Tuple
{
    public readonly V1 v1;
    public readonly V2 v2;

    public Tuple(V1 v1, V2 v2)
    {
        this.v1 = v1;
        this.v2 = v2;
    }
}

// Example usage:
var tup = Tuple.Create(1, "test");

Which gives you fully type inferred factory methods everywhere!

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Easier-on-the-eyes / condensed ORM-mapping using LINQ

Consider this table:

[MessageId] INT,
[MessageText] NVARCHAR(MAX)
[MessageDate] DATETIME

... And this structure:

struct Message
{
    Int32 Id;
    String Text;
    DateTime Date;
}



Instead of doing something along the lines of:

List<Message> messages = new List<Message>();

foreach (row in DataTable.Rows)
{
    var message = new Message
    {
        Id = Convert.ToInt32(row["MessageId"]),
        Text = Convert.ToString(row["MessageText"]),
        Date = Convert.ToDateTime(row["MessageDate"])
    };

    messages.Add(message);
}

You can use LINQ and do the same thing with fewer lines of code, and in my opinion; more style. Like so:

var messages = DataTable.AsEnumerable().Select(r => new Message
{
    Id = Convert.ToInt32(r["MessageId"]),
    Text = Convert.ToString(r["MessageText"]),
    Date = Convert.ToDateTime(r["MessageDate"])
}).ToList();

This approach can be nested, just like loops can.

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2  
It's an interesting approach, but I'm not convinced that it's easier on the eyes. It's definitely not easier to understand for the average programmer, in my opinion. –  Kyralessa Jan 9 '10 at 2:06
10  
+1 for greatly improving the readability. I think the new code is much easier on the eyes. Although today the average C# programmer is still programming procedurally, that will change quickly. I've found that when you show most procedural programmers the LINQ version they understand immediately and say something like "wow!" and want to know how they can use it themselves. –  Ray Burns Feb 5 '10 at 4:58
1  
@roosteronacid: I hope you don't mind that I simplified your LINQ code slightly to make it even more readable. If it's a problem, just change it back. –  Ray Burns Feb 5 '10 at 4:59
3  
You can even use the Field<T>(name) extensions: r.Field<int>("MessageId") (I wish I didn't have to know that) –  David Kemp Mar 29 '11 at 15:10

Falling through switch-cases can be achieved by having no code in a case (see case 0), or using the special goto case (see case 1) or goto default (see case 2) forms:

switch (/*...*/) {
    case 0: // shares the exact same code as case 1
    case 1:
        // do something
        goto case 2;
    case 2:
        // do something else
        goto default;
    default:
        // do something entirely different
        break;
}
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1  
Note that "goto case" is discouraged in this article: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vcsharp/aa336815.aspx –  J c Oct 12 '08 at 1:32
1  
I'd be one to suggest that any use of 'goto' is discouraged in general -- but that doesn't mean that it isn't useful. –  Alex Lyman Oct 12 '08 at 9:46
10  
I think in a switch is only place a goto is acceptable. –  Matt Grande Mar 26 '09 at 15:16
1  
I think I would be very upset if I encountered code like this and had to debug or maintain it... –  Richard Everett Apr 2 '09 at 14:23
1  
@Martin Ongtangco: Only if case 2's "// do something else" is empty. –  Alex Lyman Jul 1 '10 at 6:43

Something I missed for a long time: you can compare strings with

"string".equals("String", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase)

instead of doing:

"string".ToLower() == "String".ToLower();
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2  
I know this should be the correct approach, but I'm annoyed by verbosity of the enum itself. –  dbkk Nov 16 '08 at 9:52
7  
Actualy, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase should be used in many case. –  François Jun 4 '09 at 14:07
4  
also microsoft has optimized for upper case comparisons so ToUppper would be better on the old way. –  Maslow Aug 14 '09 at 19:25

You can use generics to check (compile time) if a method argument implements two interfaces:

interface IPropA 
{
    string PropA { get; set; } 
}

interface IPropB 
{
    string PropB { get; set; }
}

class TestClass 
{
    void DoSomething<T>(T t) where T : IPropA, IPropB 
    {
        MessageBox.Show(t.PropA);
        MessageBox.Show(t.PropB);
    }
}

Same with an argument that is inherited from a base class and an interface.

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1  
@Mark: No, you don't have to cast it. The fact that t implements the given interfaces is known explicitly from the where (in fact, that is all that is known, other than that t is an object), so the cast is unnecessary. When t.PropA is accessed, it works exactly as if t were a non-generic parameter of type IPropA, and when t.PropB is accessed, it works exactly as if t were a non-generic parameter of type IPropB. –  P Daddy Jun 14 '09 at 20:15
1  
@tuinstoel: +1! This is an excellent demonstration of functionality that's not possible without generics. –  P Daddy Jun 14 '09 at 20:17

A couple I can think of:

[field: NonSerialized()]
public EventHandler event SomeEvent;

This prevents the event from being serialised. The 'field:' indicates that the attribute should be applied to the event's backing field.

Another little known feature is overriding the add/remove event handlers:

public event EventHandler SomeEvent
{
    add
    {
        // ...
    }

    remove
    {
        // ...
    }
}
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I love the fact that I can use LINQ to objects on plain old .NET 2.0 (i.e. without requiring .NET 3.5 to be installed everywhere). All you need is an implementation of all the query operator Extension methods - see LINQBridge

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Extension methods can be called on null; this will not cause a NullReferenceException to be thrown.

Example application: you can define an alternative for ToString() called ToStringOrEmpty() which will return the empty string when called on null.

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There are operators for performing implicit and explicit user-defined type conversion between the declared class and one or more arbitrary classes. The implicit operator effectively allows the simulation of overloading the assignement operator, which is possible in languages such as C++ but not C#.

It doesn't seem to be a feature one comes across very often, but it is in fact used in the LINQ to XML (System.Xml.Linq) library, where you can implicitly convert strings to XName objects. Example:

XName tagName = "x:Name";

I discovered this feature in this article about how to simulate multiple inheritance in C#.

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The delegate syntax have evolved over successive versions of C#, but I still find them difficult to remember. Fortunately the Action<> and Func<> delegates are easy to remember.

For example:

  • Action<int> is a delegate method that takes a single int argument and returns void.
  • Func<int> is a delegate method that takes no arguments and returns an int.
  • Func<int, bool> is a delegate method that takes a single int argument and returns a bool.

These features were introduced in version 3.5 of the .NET framework.

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  1. I can't comment yet, but note that by default Visual Studio 2008 automatically steps over properties, so the DebuggerStepThrough attribute is no longer needed in that case.

  2. Also, I haven't noticed anyone showing how to declare a parameter-less lambda (useful for implementing Action<>)

    () => DoSomething(x);

You should also read up on closures - I'm not clever enough to explain them properly. But basically it means that the compiler does clever stuff so that the x in that line of code will still work even if it goes 'out of scope' after creating the lambda.

  1. I also discovered recently that you can pretend to ignore a lambda parameter:

    (e, _) => DoSomething(e)

It's not really ignoring it, it's just that _ is a valid identifier. So you couldn't ignore both of the parameters like that, but I think it is a kind of neat way to indicate that we don't care about that parameter (typically the EventArgs which is .Empty).

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To call the base class constructor just put base() inline with the constructor.
To call the base class method you can just put base.MethodName() inside the derived class method

class ClassA 
{
  public ClassA(int a)
  {
    //Do something
  }

  public void Method1()
  {
     //Do Something
  }
}

class ClassB : ClassA
{
  public ClassB(int a) : base(a) // calling the base class constructor
  {
    //Do something
  }

  public void Method2()
  {
    base.Method1();               // calling the base class method
  }
}

Of course you can call the methods of the base class by just saying base.MethodName()

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TrueForAll Method of List<T> :

List<int> s = new List<int> { 6, 1, 2 };

bool a = s.TrueForAll(p => p > 0);
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One thing not many people know about are some of the C#-introduced preprocessor directives. You can use #error This is an error. to generate a compiler error and #warning This is a warning.

I usually use these when I'm developing with a top-down approach as a "todo" list. I'll #error Implement this function, or #warning Eventually implement this corner case as a reminder.

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2  
Can't you just use TODO: comments in Visual Studio? dotnetperls.com/todo-comments-visual-studio –  Dan Diplo Sep 6 '09 at 16:22

The Or assignment operator is quite nice. You can write this:

x |= y

instead of this:

x = x | y

This is often practical if you have to a variable or property (x in the example) that starts out as false but you want to change it to the value of some other boolean variable/property only when that other value is true.

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Nested classes can access private members of a outer class.

public class Outer
{
    private int Value { get; set; }

    public class Inner
    {
        protected void ModifyOuterMember(Outer outer, int value)
        {
            outer.Value = value;
        }
    }
}

And now together with the above feature you can also inherit from nested classes as if they were top level classes as shown below.

public class Cheater : Outer.Inner
{
    protected void MakeValue5(Outer outer)
    {
        ModifyOuterMember(outer, 5);
    }
}

These features allow for some interesting possibilities as far as providing access to particular members via somewhat hidden classes.

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Not sure if this one got mentioned yet but the ThreadStatic attribute is a realy useful one. This makes a static field static just for the current thread.

[ThreadStatic]
private static int _ThreadStaticInteger;

You should not include an initializer because it only get executed once for the entire application, you're better off making the field nullable and checking if the value is null before you use it.

And one more thing for ASP.NET applications threads are reused so if you modify the value it could end up being used for another page request.

Still I have found this useful on several occasions. For example in creating a custom transaction class that:

using (DbTransaction tran = new DbTransaction())
{
    DoQuery("...");
    DoQuery("...");    
}

The DbTransaction constructor sets a ThreadStatic field to its self and resets it to null in the dispose method. DoQuery checks the static field and if != null uses the current transaction if not it defaults to something else. We avoid having to pass the transaction to each method plus it makes it easy to wrap other methods that were not originaly meant to be used with transaction inside a transaction ...

Just one use :)

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You can change rounding scheme using:

var value = -0.5;
var value2 = 0.5;
var value3 = 1.4;

Console.WriteLine( Math.Round(value, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero) ); //out: -1
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(value2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero)); //out: 1
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(value3, MidpointRounding.ToEven)); //out: 1
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Preprocessor Directives can be nifty if you want different behavior between Debug and Release modes.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ed8yd1ha.aspx

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System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert (false);

will trigger a popup and allow you to attach a debugger to a running .NET process during execution. Very useful for those times when for some reason you can't directly debug an ASP.NET application.

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2  
So will Debugger.Break(); –  P Daddy Nov 17 '08 at 13:34
4  
@Maslow, no - the Debug.Assert method is flagged with [Conditional("DEBUG")], which means calls to it get removed in non-DEBUG builds. Unless you build your production code with the DEBUG flag, in which case... –  Danut Enachioiu Sep 3 '09 at 4:52
2  
use System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Launch() –  Nissim Dec 21 '09 at 14:10

String interning. This is one that I haven't seen come up in this discussion yet. It's a little obscure, but in certain conditions it can be useful.

The CLR keeps a table of references to literal strings (and programmatically interned strings). If you use the same string in several places in your code it will be stored once in the table. This can ease the amount of memory required for allocating strings.

You can test if a string is interned by using String.IsInterned(string) and you can intern a string using String.Intern(string).

Note: The CLR can hold a reference to an interned string after application or even AppDomain end. See the MSDN documentation for details.

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IEnumerable's SelectMany, which flattens a list of lists into a single list. Let's say I have a list of Orders, and each Order has a list of LineItems on that order.

I want to know the total number of LineItems sold...

int totalItems = Orders.Select(o => o.LineItems).SelectMany(i => i).Sum();
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11  
int totalItems = Orders.SelectMany(o => o.LineItems).Sum(); –  Pop Catalin Apr 6 '09 at 12:51

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