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This came to my mind after I learned the following from this question:

where T : struct

We, C# developers, all know the basics of C#. I mean declarations, conditionals, loops, operators, etc.

Some of us even mastered the stuff like Generics, anonymous types, lambdas, LINQ, ...

But what are the most hidden features or tricks of C# that even C# fans, addicts, experts barely know?

Here are the revealed features so far:


Keywords

Attributes

Syntax

Language Features

Visual Studio Features

Framework

Methods and Properties

Tips & Tricks

  • Nice method for event handlers by Andreas H.R. Nilsson
  • Uppercase comparisons by John
  • Access anonymous types without reflection by dp
  • A quick way to lazily instantiate collection properties by Will
  • JavaScript-like anonymous inline-functions by roosteronacid

Other

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296 Answers 296

How about Expression Trees? They are the heart of LINQ and allow for defered execution:

Taken from David Hayden's blog:

In C# 3.0, you can define a delegate as follows using a lambda expression:

Func<int,int> f = x => x + 1;

This delegate is compiled into executable code in your application and can be called as such:

var three = f(2); // 2 + 1

The code works as you would expect. Nothing fancy here.

Expression Trees

When you define the delegate as an Expression Tree by using System.Query.Expression:

Expression<Func<int,int>> expression = x => x + 1;

The delegate is no longer compiled into executable code, but compiled as data that can be converted and compiled into the original delegate.

To actually use the delegate represented as an Expression Tree in your application, you would have to compile and invoke it in your application:

var originalDelegate = expression.Compile();

var three = originalDelegate.Invoke(2);
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Generics and the Curiously-Recurring Template Pattern really help with some static method/property declarations.

Suppose you are building a class hierarchy:

class Base
{
}

class Foo: Base
{
}

class Bar: Base
{
}

Now, you want to declare static methods on your types that should take parameters (or return values) of the same type or static properties of the same type. For example, you want:

class Base
{
    public static Base Get()
    {
        // Return a suitable Base.
    }
}

class Foo: Base
{
    public static Foo Get()
    {
        // Return a suitable Foo.
    }
}

class Bar: Base
{
    public static Bar Get()
    {
        // Return a suitable Bar.
    }
}

If these static methods basically all do the same thing, then you have lots of duplicated code on your hands. One solution would be to drop type safety on the return values and to always return type Base. However, if you want type safety, then the solution is to declare the Base as:

class Base<T> where T: Base<T>
{
    public static T Get<T>()
    {
        // Return a suitable T.
    }
}

and you Foo and Bar as:

class Foo: Base<Foo>
{
}

class Bar: Base<Bar>
{
}

This way, they will automatically get their copies of the static methods.

This also works wonders to encapsulate the Singleton pattern in a base class (I know the code below is not thread-safe, it just to demonstrate a point):

public class Singleton<T> where T: Singleton<T>, new()
{
  public static T Instance { get; private set; }

  static Singleton<T>()
  {
    Instance = new T();
  }
}

I realize that this forces you to have a public parameterless constructor on your singleton subclass but there is no way to avoid that at compile time without a where T: protected new() construct; however one can use reflection to invoke the protected/private parameterless constructor of the sub-class at runtime to achieve that.

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1  
Why not just protected abstract T CreateInstance() forcing the child class to override that and then in Instance property you'd call the method if there's Instance == null ? –  chakrit Feb 25 '10 at 8:56
1  
It's answers to questions like this that makes me wish I could "Favorite" an answer. –  Pretzel May 14 '10 at 18:55
1  
@Pretzel - I agree that a proper "Favorite" option would be much better, but I have managed to use up-votes to achieve something similar. You can always up-vote the answer you like and when you later go over the stuff that you have up-voted, you end up finding your "Favorite"s. –  paracycle May 15 '10 at 8:51

A few from me - make of them what you will.

The attribute:

[assembly::InternalsVisibleTo("SomeAssembly")]

Allows you to expose out the internal methods/properties or data from your assembly to another assembly called 'SomeAssembly'. All protected/private stuff remains hidden.


Static constructors ( otherwise called 'Type Constructor' )

public MyClass
{
  public static MyClass()
  {
     // type init goes here
  }
  ......
}


The keyword internal. So useful in so many ways.

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A lot of this is explained already, in the standard. It's a good read for any beginner as well as expert, it's a lot to read, but it's the official standard, and it's filled with juicy details.

Once you fully understand C#, it's time to take this further to understand the fundamentals of the Common Language Infrastructure. The architecture and underpinnings of C#.

I've met a variety of programmers that don't know the difference between an object and a ValueType except the adherent limitations thereof.

Familiarize yourself with these two documents and you'll never become that person.

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I think a lot of people know about pointers in C but are not sure if it works in C#. You can use pointers in C# in an unsafe context:

static void Main()
{
    int i;
    unsafe
    {               
        // pointer pi has the address of variable i
        int* pi = &i; 
        // pointer ppi has the address of variable pi
        int** ppi = &pi;
        // ppi(addess of pi) -> pi(addess of i) -> i(0)
        i = 0;
        // dereference the pi, i.e. *pi is i
        Console.WriteLine("i = {0}", *pi); // output: i = 0
        // since *pi is i, equivalent to i++
        (*pi)++;
        Console.WriteLine("i = {0}", *pi); // output: i = 1
        // since *ppi is pi, one more dereference  *pi is i 
        // equivalent to i += 2
        **ppi += 2;
        Console.WriteLine("i = {0}", *pi);// output: i = 3
    }
    Console.ReadLine();
}
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Convert enum values to a string value

Given the enum

enum Country
{
    UnitedKingdom, 
    UnitedStates,
    UnitedArabEmirates,
}

using it:

public static void PrintEnumAsString( Country country )
{
    Console.Writeline( country.ToString() );
}

will print the name of the enum value as a string, e.g. "UnitedKingdom"

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9  
It's not a trick or even a hidden feature of C# or .NET at all. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Nov 26 '09 at 11:42
  • Attaching ? to a Type to make it nullable, ex: int?
  • "c:\dir" instead of @"C:\dir"
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I just want to mention (because of the OP metioning where T : struct) that one of the C# compiler gotchas is that

where T : Enum

will NOT compile. It throws the error "Constraint cannot be special class 'System.Enum'".

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One of the most useful features Visual Studio has is "Make object id". It generates an id and "attaches" to the object so wherever you look at the object you will also see the id (regardless of the thread).

While debugging right click on the variable tooltip and there you have it. It also works on watched/autos/locals variables.

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Collection Initializer inside Object Initializer:

MailMessage mail = new MailMessage {
   To = { new MailAddress("a@example.com"), new MailAddress("b@example.com") },
   Subject = "Password Recovery"
};

You can initialize a whole tree in a single expression.

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This relates to static constructors. This is a method for performing static destruction (i.e. cleaning up resources when the program quits).

First off the class:

class StaticDestructor
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The delegate that is invoked when the destructor is called.
    /// </summary>
    public delegate void Handler();
    private Handler doDestroy;

    /// <summary>
    /// Creates a new static destructor with the specified delegate to handle the destruction.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="method">The delegate that will handle destruction.</param>
    public StaticDestructor(Handler method)
    {
        doDestroy = method;
    }

    ~StaticDestructor()
    {
        doDestroy();
    }
}

Then as a member of the class you wish to have a "static destructor" do:

private static readonly StaticDestructor destructor = new StaticDestructor
(
    delegate()
    {
        //Cleanup here
    }
);

This will now be called when final garbage collection occurs. This is useful if you absolutely need to free up certain resources.

A quick and dirty program exhibiting this behavior:

using System;

namespace TestStaticDestructor
{
    class StaticDestructor
    {
        public delegate void Handler();
        private Handler doDestroy;

        public StaticDestructor(Handler method)
        {
            doDestroy = method;
        }

        ~StaticDestructor()
        {
            doDestroy();
        }
    }

    class SomeClass
    {
        static SomeClass()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Statically constructed!");
        }

        static readonly StaticDestructor destructor = new StaticDestructor(
            delegate()
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Statically destructed!");
            }
        );
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            SomeClass someClass = new SomeClass();
            someClass = null;
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }
    }
}

When the program exits, the "static destructor" is called.

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I don't condone it, but I was surprised that goto is still around ducks incoming projectiles

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6  
I use goto on occasion. There is nothing wrong with it. –  ChaosPandion Jun 22 '10 at 20:05
8  
@ChaosPandion watch out for Velociraptors xkcd.com/292 –  STW Jun 22 '10 at 20:23
6  
Since the switch construct in C# no longer allows case fall-through, the goto statement is the only thing that you have to pass control onto another case statement, just like it says in the documentation that you link to. Hidden? Perhaps. Wrong? Absolutely not. –  Dave Van den Eynde Jun 22 '10 at 20:33
1  
@Chaos: Key word: "on occasion". –  bobobobo Jun 23 '10 at 0:43

I am bit late in this conversation and I would like to contribute the following. It may be a new thing for some developers.

public class User
{
    public long UserId { get; set; }
    public String Name { get; set; }
    public String Password { get; set; }
    public String Email { get; set; }
}

The usual way to declare and initialize it is with a constructor or like following.

User user = new User();
user.UserId = 1;
user.Name = "myname";
etc

But I learned following way to initialize it. I know Visual Basic developers will love it because it's like with operator available only in VB.NET and not in C# that is as follows.

User user = new User()
{
    UserId = 1,
    Name = "myname",
    Email = "myemail@domain.com",
    Password = "mypassword"
};
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1  
this operator <> with operator ... With are wayyy more awesome :) –  chakrit Feb 25 '10 at 8:20

TryParse method for each primitive type is great when validating user input.

double doubleValue
if (!Double.TryParse(myDataRow("myColumn"), out doubleValue))
{
    // set validation error
}
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I love abusing the fact that static templated classes don't share their static members.

Here's a threadsafe (at creation time) and cheap substitute to any Dictionary<Type,...> when the Type instance is known at compile-time.

public static class MyCachedData<T>{
    static readonly CachedData Value;
    static MyCachedData(){
       Value=// Heavy computation, such as baking IL code or doing lots of reflection on a type
    }
}

Cheers, Florian

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You can combine the protected and internal accessor to make it public within the same assembly, but protected in a diffrent assembly. This can be used on fields, properties, method and even constants.

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Returning IQueryable projections

protected void LdsPostings_Selecting(object sender, LinqDataSourceSelectEventArgs e)
{   
    var dc = new MyDataContext();
    var query = dc.Posting.AsQueryable();

    if (isCondition1)
    {
        query = query.Where(q => q.PostedBy == Username);
        e.Result = QueryProjection(query);
        return;
    }

    ...

    if (isConditionN)
    {
        query = query.Where(q => q.Status.StatusName == "submitted");
        query = query.Where(q => q.ReviewedBy == Username);
        e.Result = QueryProjection(query);
        return;
    }
}

and rather than coding the projection multiple times, create a single method:

private IQueryable QueryProjection(IQueryable<Posting> query)
{
    return query.Select(p => new
    {
        p.PostingID,
        p.Category.CategoryName,
        p.Type.TypeName,
        p.Status.StatusName,
        p.Description,
        p.Updated,
        p.PostedBy,
        p.ReviewedBy,
    });
}
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ContextBoundObject

Not so much a C# thing as a .NET thing. It's another way of achieving DI although it can be hardwork. And you have to inherit from it which can be off putting.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.contextboundobject.aspx

I've used it to add logging when I decorate a class/method with a custom logging attribute.

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double dSqrd = Math.Pow(d,2.0);

is more accurate than

double dSqrd = d * d; // Here we can lose precision
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ThreadStaticAttribute is a favorite of mine. Also, NonSerializableAttribute is useful. (Can you tell I do a lot of server stuff using remoting?)

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ViewState getters can be one-liners.

Using a default value:

public string Caption
{
    get { return (string) (ViewState["Caption"] ?? "Foo"); }
    set { ViewState["Caption"] = value; }
}

public int Index
{
    get { return (int) (ViewState["Index"] ?? 0); }
    set { ViewState["Index"] = value; }
}

Using null as the default:

public string Caption
{
    get { return (string) ViewState["Caption"]; }
    set { ViewState["Caption"] = value; }
}

public int? Index
{
    get { return (int?) ViewState["Index"]; }
    set { ViewState["Index"] = value; }
}

This works for anything backed by a dictionary.

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Well... Don't use it, but a lot of people don't know C# supports the evil goto:)

static void Example()
{
    int i = 0;
top:
    Console.WriteLine(i.ToString());
    if (i == 0)
    {
        i++;
        goto top;
    }
}
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6  
@Oorang: I'd rather see a well-placed goto now and then than more complicated code that tries to avoid it. I've only rarely needed it, and most uses have been of the goto case... variety within a switch statement, but it's good to have it when it's what you need. Goto's inclusion in the language is for those occasional times when it really is the clearest construct, not to be avoided at all costs. –  P Daddy Jun 14 '09 at 19:44

Only for reference - enum binary operations using the extension method.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace BinaryOpGenericTest
{
    [Flags]
    enum MyFlags
    {
        A = 1,
        B = 2,
        C = 4

    }

    static class EnumExtensions
    {
        private static Dictionary<Type, Delegate> m_operations = new Dictionary<Type, Delegate>();

        public static bool IsFlagSet<T>(this T firstOperand, T secondOperand) 
                                                  where T : struct
        {

            Type enumType = typeof(T);


            if (!enumType.IsEnum)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Enum type parameter required");
            }


            Delegate funcImplementorBase = null;
            m_operations.TryGetValue(enumType, out funcImplementorBase);

            Func<T, T, bool> funcImplementor = funcImplementorBase as Func<T, T, bool>;

            if (funcImplementor == null)
            {
                funcImplementor = buildFuncImplementor(secondOperand);
            }



            return funcImplementor(firstOperand, secondOperand);
        }


        private static Func<T, T, bool> buildFuncImplementor<T>(T val)
                                                            where T : struct
        {
            var first = Expression.Parameter(val.GetType(), "first");
            var second = Expression.Parameter(val.GetType(), "second");

            Expression convertSecondExpresion = Expression.Convert(second, typeof(int));
            var andOperator = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, bool>>(Expression.Equal(
                                                                                                       Expression.And(
                                                                                                            Expression.Convert(first, typeof(int)),
                                                                                                             convertSecondExpresion),
                                                                                                       convertSecondExpresion),
                                                                                             new[] { first, second });
            Func<T, T, bool> andOperatorFunc = andOperator.Compile();
            m_operations[typeof(T)] = andOperatorFunc;
            return andOperatorFunc;
        }
    }


    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyFlags flag = MyFlags.A | MyFlags.B;

            Console.WriteLine(flag.IsFlagSet(MyFlags.A));            
            Console.WriteLine(EnumExtensions.IsFlagSet(flag, MyFlags.C));
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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If you are trying to create a comma delimited string from a list of items:

string[] itemList = { "Example 1", "Example 2", "Example 3" };
CommaDelimitedStringCollection commaStr = new CommaDelimitedStringCollection();
commaStr.AddRange(itemList);
//outputs Example 1,Example 2,Example 3

Look here for another example.

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12  
I would do string.Join(",", itemList) –  Theo Jul 24 '09 at 15:54

At first - DebuggerTypeProxy.

[DebuggerTypeProxy(typeof(HashtableDebugView))]
class MyHashtable : Hashtable
{
    private const string TestString = 
        "This should not appear in the debug window.";

    internal class HashtableDebugView
    {
        private Hashtable hashtable;
        public const string TestStringProxy = 
            "This should appear in the debug window.";

        // The constructor for the type proxy class must have a 
        // constructor that takes the target type as a parameter.
        public HashtableDebugView(Hashtable hashtable)
        {
            this.hashtable = hashtable;
        }
    }
}

At second:

ICustomTypeDescriptor

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Keeps DataGridView from showing the property:

[System.ComponentModel.Browsable(false)]
public String LastActionID{get; private set;}

Lets you set a friendly display for components (like a DataGrid or DataGridView):

[System.ComponentModel.DisplayName("Last Action")]
public String LastAction{get; private set;}

For your backing variables, if you don't want anything accessing them directly this makes it tougher:

[System.ComponentModel.EditorBrowsable(System.ComponentModel.EditorBrowsableState.Never)]
	private DataController p_dataSources;
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The following one is not hidden, but it's quite implicit. I don't know whether samples like the following one have been published here, and I can't see are there any benefits (probably there are none), but I'll try to show a "weird" code. The following sample simulates for statement via functors in C# (delegates / anonymous delegates [lambdas]) and closures. Other flow statements like if, if/else, while and do/whle are simulated as well, but I'm not sure for switch (perhaps, I'm too lazy :)). I've compacted the sample source code a little to make it more clear.

private static readonly Action EmptyAction = () => { };
private static readonly Func<bool> EmptyCondition = () => { return true; };

private sealed class BreakStatementException : Exception { }
private sealed class ContinueStatementException : Exception { }
private static void Break() { throw new BreakStatementException(); }
private static void Continue() { throw new ContinueStatementException(); }

private static void For(Action init, Func<bool> condition, Action postBlock, Action statement) {
    init = init ?? EmptyAction;
    condition = condition ?? EmptyCondition;
    postBlock = postBlock ?? EmptyAction;
    statement = statement ?? EmptyAction;
    for ( init(); condition(); postBlock() ) {
        try {
            statement();
        } catch ( BreakStatementException ) {
            break;
        } catch ( ContinueStatementException ) {
            continue;
        }
    }
}

private static void Main() {
    int i = 0; // avoiding error "Use of unassigned local variable 'i'" if not using `for` init block
    For(() => i = 0, () => i < 10, () => i++,
        () => {
            if ( i == 5 )
                Continue();
            Console.WriteLine(i);
        }
    );
}

If I'm not wrong, this approach is pretty relative to the functional programming practice. Am I right?

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3  
Not really. Functional programming practice doesn't just mean "replace everything with functions"... it's thinking functionally. You're still writing a for loop, an elaborate one. Most of the time you will use recursive implementation when programming functionally as that will allows you to code declaratively instead of imperatively I think you missed that point. –  chakrit Feb 25 '10 at 8:49

Definitely the Func<> types when used with statement lambdas in .NET 3.5. These allow customizable functions, and can be a great aid in offering user customizable objects without subclassing them or resorting to some limited system like keeping track of a variable that lists what button or key the user wants to monitor. Also, they can be called just like regular methods and can be assigned like variables. The only downside that I can think of is that you're limited to 5 arguments! Although by that point you might want to consider a different solution... Edit: Providing some examples.

...
public Func<InputHelper, float> _horizontalCameraMovement = (InputHelper input) => 
{
    return (input.LeftStickPosition.X * _moveRate) * _zoom;
}
public Func<InputHelper, float> _verticalCameraMovement = (InputHelper input) => 
{
    return (-input.LeftStickPosition.Y * _moveRate) * _zoom;
}
...
public void Update(InputHelper input)
{
    ...
    position += new Vector2(_horizontalCameraMovement(input), _verticalCameraMovement(input));
    ...
}

In this example, you can write a function that does arbitrary calculation and returns a float that will determine the amount that the camera moves by. Not the best code but it gets the point across.

private int foo;
public int FooProperty {
    get
    {
        if (_onFooGotten() == true)
            return _foo;
    }
    set
    {
        if (onFooSet() == true)
            _foo = value;
    }
}
...
public Func<bool> _onFooGotten = () => 
{
    //do whatever...
    return true;
}
public Func<bool> _onFooSet = () =>
{
    //do whatever...
    return true;
}

This isn't the best example (as I haven't really explored this use yet) but it shows an example of using a lambda function for a quick event raiser without the hassle of delegates. Edit: thought of another one. Nullables! The closest thing C# has to optional parameters.

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The "TODO" property and the tasks list

//TODO: [something] 

Adding that to your code (the spacing is important) throws an item in your task list, and double clicking the item will jump you to the appropriate location in your code.

share
5  
You can also define your own custom tags, I think that most people also use: BUG, FIX, REFACTOR, HACK We also use: - MANUAL for missing documentation hints/changes. - QUESTION for changes or code you want the opinion of the development team before proceeding - RESOURCE if the code is based on a blogpost, article, some document (with the url after it) –  Cohen Dec 30 '09 at 12:17
1  
Actually, it's a Visual Studio feature, C# doesn't take care on such comments or whatever something like this. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Feb 28 '10 at 23:52

I didn't knew about Generic methods which could help avoid using Method Overloadding. Below are overloaded methods to print int and double numbers.

    private static void printNumbers(int [] intNumbers)
    { 
        foreach(int element in intNumbers)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(element);
        }

    }

    private static void printNumbers(double[] doubleNumbers)
    {
        foreach (double element in doubleNumbers)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(element);
        }
    }

Generic method which help to have one method for both of the above

    private static void printNumbers<E>(E [] Numbers)
    {
        foreach (E element in Numbers)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(element);
        }
    }
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