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This came to my mind after I learned the following from this question:

where T : struct

We, C# developers, all know the basics of C#. I mean declarations, conditionals, loops, operators, etc.

Some of us even mastered the stuff like Generics, anonymous types, lambdas, LINQ, ...

But what are the most hidden features or tricks of C# that even C# fans, addicts, experts barely know?

Here are the revealed features so far:


Keywords

Attributes

Syntax

Language Features

Visual Studio Features

Framework

Methods and Properties

Tips & Tricks

  • Nice method for event handlers by Andreas H.R. Nilsson
  • Uppercase comparisons by John
  • Access anonymous types without reflection by dp
  • A quick way to lazily instantiate collection properties by Will
  • JavaScript-like anonymous inline-functions by roosteronacid

Other

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296 Answers 296

This means T must have a public parameterless constructor :

 class MyClass<T> where T : new()
 {

 }
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1  
So you can new() it in the implementation. –  riezebosch Sep 27 '11 at 14:17

Reflection Emit and Expression trees come to mind...

Don't miss Jeffrey Richter's CLR via C# and Jon Skeet's alt text

See here for some resources:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/trace/releasemodebreakpoint.aspx

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/dotnet/Creating_Dynamic_Types.aspx

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/lambdaexpressions.aspx

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System.Runtime.Remoting.Proxies.RealProxy

It enables Aspect Oriented Programming in C#, and you can also do a lot of other fancy stuff with it.

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The generic event handler:

public event EventHandler<MyEventArgs> MyEvent;

This way you don't have to declare your own delegates all the time,

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I didn't discover - for almost a year - that Strongly Typed DataRows contain an Is[ColumnName]Null() method.

For example:

Units.UnitsDataTable dataTable = new Units.UnitsDataTable();

foreach (Units.UnitsRow row in dataTable.Rows)
{
    if (row.IsPrimaryKeyNull())
        //....

    if (row.IsForeignKeyNull())
        //....
}
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3  
To be nitpicky, it's not a C# feature, it's a .NET feature ;) –  LBugnion Jan 7 '09 at 10:43

Is constructor chain already cited?

namespace constructorChain {
    using System;

    public class Class1 {
        public string x;
        public string y;

        public Class1() {
            x = "class1";
            y = "";
        }

        public Class1(string y)
            : this() {
            this.y = y;
        }
    }

    public class Class2 : Class1 {
        public Class2(int y)
            : base(y.ToString()) {

        }
    }
}

...

        constructorChain.Class1 c1 = new constructorChain.Class1();
        constructorChain.Class1 c12 = new constructorChain.Class1("Hello, Constructor!");
        constructorChain.Class2 c2 = new constructorChain.Class2(10);
        Console.WriteLine("{0}:{1}", c1.x, c1.y);
        Console.WriteLine("{0}:{1}", c12.x, c12.y);
        Console.WriteLine("{0}:{1}", c2.x, c2.y);

        Console.ReadLine();
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3  
Everytime you have constructors that contains the same initialization code, constructor chaining avoids code duplication. –  kentaromiura Mar 27 '09 at 10:01

FIXED / Power of Pointers in C# - This topic is too big, but I will just outline simple things.

In C we had facility of loading structure like...

struct cType{
   char type[4];
   int  size;
   char name[50];
   char email[100];
}

cType myType;
fread(file, &mType, sizeof(mType));

We can use fixed keyword in "unsafe" method to read byte array aligned structure.

[Layout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1)]
public unsafe class CType{
    public fixed byte type[4];
    public int size;
    public fixed byte name[50];
    public fixed byte email[100];
}

Method 1 (Reading from regular stream in to byte buffer and mapping byte array to individual bytes of struct)

CType mType = new CType();
byte[] buffer = new byte[Marshal.SizeOf(CType)];
stream.Read(buffer,0,buffer.Length);
// you can map your buffer back to your struct...
fixed(CType* sp = &mType)
{
    byte* bsp = (byte*) sp;
    fixed(byte* bp = &buffer)
    {
         for(int i=0;i<buffer.Length;i++)
         {
             (*bsp) = (*bp);
             bsp++;bp++;
         }
    }
}

Method 2, you can map Win32 User32.dll's ReadFile to directly read bytes...

CType mType = new CType();
fixed(CType* p = &mType)
{
    User32.ReadFile(fileHandle, (byte*) p, Marshal.SizeOf(mType),0);
}
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Zero parameter Lambdas

()=>Console.ReadLine()
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1  
Needs explanation of where you'd use this. –  Kyralessa Aug 6 '09 at 1:11

I didn't see this:

for (;;);

The same as

while (true) ;
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1  
That has been valid syntax since the dawn of C. :-) –  Christian Hayter Aug 18 '09 at 18:15

One that I just learned recently is that you can still call methods on a nullable value....

It turns out what when you have a nullable value:

decimal? MyValue = null;

where you might think you would have to write:

MyValue == null ? null : MyValue .ToString()

you can instead write:

MyValue.ToString()

I've been aware that I could call MyValue.HasValue and MyValue.Value...but it didn't fully click that I could call ToString().

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@lainMH,

Nullable booleans are useful when retrieving values from a database that are nullable and when putting values back in. Sometimes you want to know the field has not been set.

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I like to use the using directive to rename some classes for easy reading like this:

// defines a descriptive name for a complexed data type
using MyDomainClassList = System.Collections.Generic.List<
  MyProjectNameSpace.MyDomainClass>;

....


MyDomainClassList myList = new MyDomainClassList();
/* instead of 
List<MyDomainClass> myList = new List<MyDomainClass>();
*/

This is also very handy for code maintenance. If you need to change the class name, there is only one place you need to change. Another example:

using FloatValue  = float; // you only need to change it once to decimal, double...

....
FloatValue val1;
...
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I apologize if this one has been mentioned, but I use this a lot.

An add-in for Visual Studio was developed by Alex Papadimoulis. It's used for pasting regular text as string, string builder, comment or region.

http://weblogs.asp.net/alex%5Fpapadimoulis/archive/2004/05/25/Smart-Paster-1.1-Add-In---StringBuilder-and-Better-C%5F2300%5F-Handling.aspx

In this plugin (I also don't know if this has been mentioned) I noticed that strings are pasted with the string literal prefix:

@

I knew about these, but I didn't know about using a double quote within a literal to escape the quote.

For example

string s = "A line of text" + Environment.NewLine + "Another with a \"quote\"!!";

can be expressed as

string s = @"A line of text 
Another with a ""quote""!!";
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This will not compile:

namespace ns
{
    class Class1
    {
        Nullable<int> a;
    }
}

The type or namespace name 'Nullable' could not be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) <-- missing 'using System;'

But

namespace ns
{
    class Class1
    {
        int? a;
    }
}

will compile! (.NET 2.0).

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1  
belongs in strangest corner cases (stackoverflow.com/questions/194484/…) but +1 anyway –  RCIX Sep 9 '09 at 11:45

I find this technique interesting while working with linqxml:

public bool GetFooSetting(XElement ndef){
   return (bool?)ndef.Element("MyBoolSettingValue") ?? true;
}

as opposed to:

public bool GetFooSetting(XElement ndef){
   return ndef.Element("MyBoolSettingValue") != null ? bool.Parse(ndef.Element("MyBoolSettingValue") ) : true;
}
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I like the EditorBrowsableAttribute. It lets you control whether a method/property is displayed or not in Intellisense. You can set the values to Always, Advanced, or Never.

From MSDN...

Remarks

EditorBrowsableAttribute is a hint to a designer indicating whether a property or method is to be displayed. You can use this type in a visual designer or text editor to determine what is visible to the user. For example, the IntelliSense engine in Visual Studio uses this attribute to determine whether to show a property or method.

In Visual C#, you can control when advanced properties appear in IntelliSense and the Properties Window with the Hide Advanced Members setting under Tools | Options | Text Editor | C#. The corresponding EditorBrowsableState is Advanced.

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1  
Using this attribute is often annoying, though. Use it where you have a member on a class due to the inheritance structure, but the member is intentionally unimplemented. But don't hide members that are just "not recommended for use". If there's any legitimate scenario for using the member, leave it visible. A particularly annoying case is TreeView.Sorted ( msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… ), where the Sorted property has functionality but is still hidden for some strange reason. –  Kyralessa Mar 5 '10 at 22:45

The Action and Func delegate helpers in conjunction with lambda methods. I use these for simple patterns that need a delegate to improve readability. For example, a simple caching pattern would be to check if the requested object exists in the cache. If it does exist: return the cached object. If it doesn't exist, generate a new instance, cache the new instance and return the new instance. Rather that write this code 1000 times for each object I may store/retrieve from the cache I can write a simple pattern method like so...

private static T CachePattern<T>(string key, Func<T> create) where T : class
{
    if (cache[key] == null)
    {
    	cache.Add(key, create());
    }

    return cache[key] as T;
}

... then I can greatly simplify my cache get/set code by using the following in my custom cache manager

public static IUser CurrentUser
{
    get
    {
    	return CachePattern<IUser>("CurrentUserKey", () => repository.NewUpUser());
    }
}

Now simple "everyday" code patterns can be written once and reused much more easily IMHO. I don't have to go write a delegate type and figure out how I want to implement a callback, etc. If I can write it in 10 seconds I'm much less apt. to resort to cutting/pasting simple code patterns whether they be lazy initialization and some other examples shown above...

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Empty blocks with braces are allowed.

You can write code like this

{
    service.DoTonsOfWork(args);
}

It's helpful when you want to try something without a using or try... finally that you've already written.

//using(var scope = new TransactionScope)
{
    service.DoTonsOfWork(args);
}
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2  
It's also handy as a visual indicator of other types of nesting; for instance, I often use braces to nest the statements between a Debug.Indent() and a Debug.Unindent. –  Kyralessa Mar 21 '10 at 17:49
2  
they are useful for limiting the scope of a variable –  modosansreves Jul 5 '10 at 12:48

Nullable.GetValueOrDefault ?

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1  
or the ?? operator for nullable types. –  ja72 Jul 24 '10 at 15:16

__arglist as well

[DllImport("msvcrt40.dll")]
public static extern int printf(string format, __arglist);

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   printf("Hello %s!\n", __arglist("Bart"));
}
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1  
+1 for the "secret" google==>community.bartdesmet.net/blogs/bart/archive/2006/09/28/… –  Behrooz Feb 6 '10 at 14:10
1  
Added example from Behrooz's link –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 6 '10 at 19:58

The #region {string} and #endregion pair is very neat for grouping code (outlining).

#region Using statements
using System;
using System.IO;
using ....;
using ....;
#endregion

The code block can be compressed to a single describing line of text. Works inside functions aswell.

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2  
I suppose it's a matter of preference, but when I'm looking at source code I'd rather not have to be expanding hidden sections of code. Regions used sparingly (outside of methods) aren't an issue, but beware using them in lieu of writing readable/maintainable code in the first place. –  J c Oct 12 '08 at 1:44
1  
I agree with not using regions inside methods. By the way, Ctrl-M, Ctrl-L will expand all the regions in Visual Studio –  LBugnion Jan 7 '09 at 10:42
1  
Basically, whenever I feel a need for regions inside a method, that region is often better suited as a method call of its own instead. –  Statement Jan 19 '09 at 8:48
1  
But isn't a #region around the using directives redundant? They're still collapsible without it. –  TheBeardyMan Feb 1 '10 at 12:07
1  
People are still using regions? Regions are a code smell: morten.lyhr.dk/2008/07/… –  Chuck Conway Jun 22 '10 at 17:52

This may be pretty basic to database application developers, but it took me a while to realize that null is not the same as DBNull.value.

You have to use DBNull.value when you want to see if a value from a database record is null.

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Just learned the joys of [UnmanagedFunctionPointerAttribute(CallingConvention.CDecl)] from trying to interface with an unmanaged C++ function library that defined callbacks without __stdcall.

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Framework Feature

I don't know but I was quite suprised about VisualStyleRenderer and the whole System.Windows.Forms.VisualStyles-Namespace. Pretty cool!

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One interesting thing I've learned is that different parts of the framework and C# language were written at different times, hence inconsistencies. For example, the framework itself violates many FxCop rules because the rules weren't all in place when the framework was written.

Also, the using statement was intended for delinieating "scopes" and not specifically for disposing resources. It was written after the lock statement. Eric Gunnerson once mentioned something along the lines of that if the using statement came first, they might have not needed to write the lock statement (though who knows, maybe they would have anyways), because the using statement might have been sufficient.

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The InternalsVisibleToAttribute specifies that types that are ordinarily visible only within the current assembly are visible to another assembly. Article on msdn

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If you have the search textbox in your Visual Studio toolbar, you can type ">of Program.cs" to open the file Program.cs

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Ability to create instance of the type based on the generic parameter like this

new T();

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1  
Requires the "where T : new()" constraint. –  Simon Svensson Jun 30 '09 at 7:21

Marketing events as non-serializable:

[field:NonSerializable]
public event SomeDelegate SomeEvent;
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Generic constraints:

 //Constructor constraint, T has a default empty constructor
class Node<K,T> where T : new() 
{
}

//Reference\Value Type constraints
//T is a struct
public class MyClass<T> where T : struct 

{...}

//T is a reference type
public class MyClass<T> where T : class 

{...}

public class MyClass<T> where T : SomeBaseClass, ISomeInterface 

{...}
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