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I am pretty sure there is and answer out there.. But I can't seem to find what is the cleanest way to do it, and I am just starting playing around with Ruby and Rails 3.1.

I have a Client model and a Project model.

I'd like to have a button on the client#show view that leads to a project#new where there is no need to input the client_id.

Furthermore the project#new should still be accessible on his own and ask for the client_id if it is not available.

Any help appreciated! Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Take a look at nested resources:

http://guides.rubyonrails.org/routing.html#nested-resources

Using that take care of the passing through of the parent ID. You can have a route that goes directly to project#new as well and then you'll just need to handle whether to ask for the client ID in the view depending on whether it is already defined.

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Mhhh are you sure it is the cleaniest way? What happens for children and subchildren of project? Shall I keep nesting? I managed to send the the ckient id as a query parameter, but doesn't look very nice either. –  Dave Jan 27 '12 at 21:38
    
No, don't keep nesting. Best practices say that you shouldn't nest more than two deep. If you think about it there's no reason to nest deeply. In a hierarchy you only need the direct parent eg: /client/4/project/new which creates a project with ID 5 and then project/5/task/new –  Nick Jan 28 '12 at 10:46
    
I honestly think that if you keep your nesting shallow it's a clean way to handle this. The path helpers end up being really clean: new_client_project_path(@client.id) –  Nick Jan 28 '12 at 10:51
    
I didn't think it this way, cool I'll give it a shot! Thanks mate. –  Dave Jan 28 '12 at 23:05

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