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I'm doing multiple copies of a file with the following command:

shutil.copy2(oldFile, newFile)

And rather than returning the creation date of the newly created file, it's keeping the older one. I'm retrieving the date with:

dateCreated = os.path.getctime(newFile)

I thought this was due to the function being copy2 which carries over meta data I believe, so I tried it with just copy to no avail.

However the odd thing is that the 'Data Modified' tab in a Windows Explorer is showing the correct date and time.

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Windows shows modified time. os.path.getmtime –  reclosedev Jan 27 '12 at 13:41
1  
Unlike in unix where ctime refers to the last changed time, on Windows ctime refers to the creation time (see docs.python.org/library/os.path.html#os.path.getctime). As comment above suggest, try os.path.getmtime(). –  Shawn Chin Jan 27 '12 at 13:44
    
When I click properties on the file, it shows the same date for both modified and creation. I'm also running the script over and over, creating 100 copies and they're the same everytime. –  Federer Jan 27 '12 at 13:45
    
shutil.copy2 is meant to do that. Are you sure you're getting that behaviour even with shutil.copy? –  Shawn Chin Jan 27 '12 at 13:48
    
Yes indeed. I've just discovered that if you do a copy and the file already exists, it does nothing. So even after deleting the last 100 copies and emptying the trash, it's just shown me: Copy 1 at Fri Jan 27 13:51:01 2012, copy 64 at Fri Jan 27 13:44:39 2012 and copy 99 at Fri Jan 27 13:51:02 2012. I'm so confused. –  Federer Jan 27 '12 at 13:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the test I tried just now, I see the following behaviour:

test.txt -> Created: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:52 PM
         -> Modified: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:52 PM

>>> from shutil import *
>>> copy('test.txt','test1.txt')

With no pre-existing version of test1.txt in the directory I get:

test1.txt -> Created: Today 8:54 AM
          -> Modified: Today 8:54 AM

I then delete test1.txt and run:

>>> copy2('test.txt','test1.txt')

With no pre-existing version of test1.txt in the directory I get:

test1.txt -> Created: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:52 PM
          -> Modified: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:52 PM

I then run:

>>> copy('test.txt','test1.txt')

So with a pre-existing version of test1.txt in the directory I get:

test1.txt -> Created: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:52 PM
          -> Modified: Today 9:00 AM

I then run:

>>> copy('test.txt','test1.txt')

So with a pre-existing version of test1.txt in the directory I get:

test1.txt -> Created: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 2:52 PM
          -> Modified: Today 9:01 AM

This is the behaviour you're seeing, your quote:

I thought this was due to the function being copy2 which carries over meta data I believe, so I tried it with just copy to no avail.

To get a new creation date you're going to have to actively remove the file before you create a new version of it using either copy or copyfile. Otherwise the date created will remain from it's original time of creation. copyfile evokes the same behaviour as copy with respect to date creation.

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Excellent investigation and I thank you for confirming what I'm seeing. However just one question. When you say I'll have to actively remove the file before you create a new version are you referring to the test.txt? If so wouldn't that mean for 500 copies I'd have to remove and recreate test.txt 500 times? Or have I missed a trick? –  Federer Jan 27 '12 at 14:18
1  
If test.txt is your originating file and you want to copy it to test1.txt, ..., test500.txt I think you're good to go with copy as long as none of the test1.txt, ..., test500.txt files already exist in your directory (i.e. don't delete 'test.txt'). Your observed behaviour I think is due to having run copy2 to create test1.txt then trying copy without removing test1.txt first. Let me know if that's making sense. –  sgallen Jan 27 '12 at 14:28
    
Oh I see, I'm following you now. I've just added a quick if os.path.exists(file) to my code as a checker, if it exists I'm adding my unique identifier twice. Makes perfect sense now. Thanks for clearing up a couple of hours confusion! –  Federer Jan 27 '12 at 14:34
    
No worries, glad I could help. –  sgallen Jan 27 '12 at 14:38
    
Nooo! from shutil import * Don't do import *, do from shutil import copy or import shutil the shutil.copy(a, b) –  nemesys Oct 30 '13 at 16:37

Just to add one note regarding:

To get a new creation date you're going to have to actively remove the file before you create a new version of it using either copy or copyfile. Otherwise the date created will remain from it's original time of creation.

I wanted to write a script that makes a backup of some files and rollover files if there are more then n backups. When you remove the existing file manualy e.g. by 'del c:\test.txt' from other CMD window then running the script, and then run the script that makes a backup, the file gets new ctime. Otherwise, if the file with same name existed and you want to create a copy, the ctime will be somehow the same as in the deleted file.

I wrote an example: test.py:

import os
import shutil
import datetime

f_path = 'c:\\test.txt'

print f_path
print 'ctime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getctime(f_path)))
print 'mtime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getmtime(f_path)))

print ''

bkp_file = f_path + '.bkp'
print 'copying to ' + bkp_file
shutil.copyfile(f_path, bkp_file)
print 'ctime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getctime(bkp_file)))
print 'mtime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getmtime(bkp_file)))

print ''
print 'removing backup...'
os.remove(bkp_file)
print 'os.path.exists(bkp_file) = ' + str(os.path.exists(bkp_file))
print ''
print 'copying to ' + bkp_file
shutil.copyfile(f_path, bkp_file)
print 'ctime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getctime(bkp_file)))
print 'mtime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getmtime(bkp_file)))
print ''
print 'removing backup again...'
os.remove(bkp_file)
print 'os.path.exists(bkp_file) = ' + str(os.path.exists(bkp_file))

import tempfile
tmp = tempfile.mktemp(dir='c:\\')
print ''
print 'Created temp file name - ' + tmp

print 'Copying to temp file name...'
shutil.copyfile(f_path, tmp)
print 'ctime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getctime(tmp)))
print 'mtime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getmtime(tmp)))

print ''
print 'renaming file to the same name as the one already deleted'
shutil.move(tmp, bkp_file)

print 'ctime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getctime(bkp_file)))
print 'mtime = ' + str(datetime.datetime.utcfromtimestamp(os.path.getmtime(bkp_file)))

output when file never existed (or deleted in different CMD window)

c:\test.py 
c:\test.txt
ctime = 2014-04-30 14:43:41.649976
mtime = 2014-05-05 11:19:19.344976

copying to c:\test.txt.bkp
ctime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.281976
mtime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.282976

removing backup... os.path.exists(bkp_file) = False

copying to c:\test.txt.bkp
ctime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.281976
mtime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.284976

removing backup again... os.path.exists(bkp_file) = False

Created temp file name - c:\tmpn5ofid Copying to temp file name...
ctime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.311976
mtime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.312976

renaming file to the same name as the one already deleted 
ctime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.281976
mtime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.312976

C:\>

output when script started second time in one CMD window

C:\>test.py
c:\test.txt
ctime = 2014-04-30 14:43:41.649976
mtime = 2014-05-05 11:19:19.344976

copying to c:\test.txt.bkp

ctime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.281976  # ctime of old file
mtime = 2014-05-05 12:21:58.179976

removing backup... os.path.exists(bkp_file) = False

copying to c:\test.txt.bkp
ctime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.281976  # ctime of old file that does not exist
mtime = 2014-05-05 12:21:58.190976

removing backup again... os.path.exists(bkp_file) = False

Created temp file name - c:\tmpzi2lp2 Copying to temp file name...
ctime = 2014-05-05 12:21:58.222976
mtime = 2014-05-05 12:21:58.222976

renaming file to the same name as the one already deleted
ctime = 2014-05-05 12:19:38.281976  # after renaming existing file it gets old ctime  
mtime = 2014-05-05 12:21:58.222976

C:\>
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To me it sounds logical that a file copy function should preserve meta data (there's a bug that it actually does not do it very well). If your are copying single file (not tree) then why not "do it yourself"(tm)?

def mycopy(src_file_path, dst_file_path, buffer_size=64*1024):
    src_file = open(src_file_path, "rb")
    dst_file = open(dst_file_path, "wb")
    data = src_file.read(64*1024)
    while data:
        dst_file.write(data)
        data = src_file.read(64*1024)

or something like that, with exception handling of course.

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Use:

shutil.copyfile(src, dst)

From the docs: "[This copies] the contents (no metadata) of the file named src to a file named dst."

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