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I have a "large" amount of data that needs to be copied every day. (6TB)

It is 15 disks presented from a SAN over Fibre Channel and being copied to a local array consisting of 22 spindles.

sources are 
/mnt/disk1
/mnt/disk2
/mnt/disk3

destination is
/mnt/Data/SystemBackup/

Due to the nature of our SAN, single threaded file copy is not very fast; but it is very capable of 600+mb/sec if we ask it in the right way. :) I need a way to spawn multiple threads in a file copy. There are MANY ways to do this in windows... but I can't find any native methods available to Linux.

Could something like Python or Perl be of assistance? Is there something I'm missing? What are your thoughts?

Edit: (Please note, I am using a modified version of gnutils cp.) Read here for more info: http://www.usenix.org/event/lisa10/tech/slides/kolano.pdf

Edit2: The code

#!/bin/bash

# Declare the foo
OPTIONS="-r --double-buffer --threads=8"
dstdir="/mnt/Data/PrUv2Backup/"
mcp=/root/mcp

# Cleanup old timestamp file
rm -rf PrUv2CopyTimes.log

# Declare array of source locations
srcdirs=(
PrUv2-home
PrUv2-trax
PrUv2-trax2
PrUv2-trax3
PrUv2-traxnl
PrUv2-traxnl2
PrUv2-traxnl3
PrUv2-traxnl4
PrUv2-traxnv
PrUv2-traxnv2
PrUv2-ulog
PrUv2-zmops
PrUv2-zmops2
PrUv2-zmops3
PrUv2-zmops4
)


for srcdir in "${srcdirs[@]}"

do
        echo `date +"%r"` $srcdir start  >> PrUv2CopyTimes.log
        $mcp $OPTIONS /mnt/$srcdir/ $dstdir
        echo `date +"%r"` $srcdir finish >> PrUv2CopyTimes.log
done

# email results
cat PrUv2CopyTimes.log | mailx -r LouPrBoxen001 -s "Backup Complete" me@us.com
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1  
When you say "if we ask it in the right way", what exactly is "the right way"? I think the threading architecture critically depends on that. –  NPE Jan 27 '12 at 13:33
    
This may sound silly, but in your copying script, couldn't you perform the copy operations in parallel? That ensures that your copy operations will effectively max out your bandwidth. Of course you'll have to weigh the number of operations you do in parallel vs performance et al but you get the idea. –  Marvin Pinto Jan 27 '12 at 13:37
    
"The right way" is kind of an unknown to me. I know that it handles random IO in a wicked fast sort of way. It likes having lots of requests and lots to do... if you ask to copy a single large file, it just can't give you the IO. –  AaronJAnderson Jan 27 '12 at 13:50
    
@MarvinPinto - I could, but I don't know how. I'll edit and post up my original copy script. –  AaronJAnderson Jan 27 '12 at 13:51
    
whole script added. –  AaronJAnderson Jan 27 '12 at 14:24

1 Answer 1

just got ultracopier, you may give it a try.

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