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Is there a better query to solve this problem ?

1 Car has many Types.

I want something like this: (ps this is incorrect, i know)

select * from car join type on car.id = type.id_car 
where type = 'SUV' 
and type = '4x4' 
and (type = 'blue' or type = 'red') 
and type = 'US' 
and (type = 'Manual' or type = 'Automatic' or 'SemiAutomatic') 
and type = 'diesel' and so on.

My solution is:

select * from car 
where numberOfANDType = (select count(1) from Type where car.id = type.id_car and type in ('suv', '4x4', 'us', 'diesel')) 
and exists (select 1 from type where car.id = type.id_car and type in ('blue', 'red'))
and exists (select 1 from type where car.id = type.id_car and type in ('manual', 'automatic' or 'SemiAutomatic');

And so on.

ps: I know the number of conditions used with AND
ps2: these conditions are dynamic.

Anywayz: i have for each Type a GROUP Column, and for the Types used in groups of OR i have the same value in this column. SUV has GROUP = 1, blue has GROUP = 2, red has GROUP = 2 and so on. So I make a query on the TYPE Column and the count on the group, to see if all groups are covered.

Select id from car join type on .. where type in ('SUV', 'blue', 'red') group by id having count(distinct group) > 2;

Thanks.

ps3: thanks to all who downvoted this question, you are very kind.

share|improve this question
    
Have you used explain plan to see if this query is not good? If im not mistaken, when you use exists the Oracle will use your type FK that point to car PK. –  Sérgio Michels Jan 27 '12 at 13:41
    
It isn't clear what you are trying to achieve - do you want to return all cars that have all of these types, all cars that have all these types but nothing else, all cars that have some of these types but nothing else, or what? –  Mark Bannister Jan 27 '12 at 13:45
    
all cars that have all AND types and at least one from the groups of OR. you can have any number of AND types or groups of OR and inside those groups of OR you can have any number of types. –  Cosmin Vacaroiu Jan 27 '12 at 13:49
    
is a car filter like here. However, the design is bad. –  Florin Ghita Jan 27 '12 at 13:59
    
No: there you have different columns (one for color, one for traction, one for transmission, and so on), here is the problem that is the same column. –  Cosmin Vacaroiu Jan 27 '12 at 14:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Expanding on my comment to Cosmin's answer, this should work:

select car.id 
from car 
join type on car.id = type.id_car 
where type.type in 
('SUV','4x4','blue','red','US','Manual','Automatic','SemiAutomatic','diesel')
group by car.id
having count(distinct type.group)=6
share|improve this answer
    
it doesn't work. because the types from the OR groups can increase the count so that it won't cover the single types with AND. –  Cosmin Vacaroiu Jan 27 '12 at 14:27
    
@CosminVacariou: You said that each of the or clauses is for a single type.group value - eg. colours are all group 2. This having clause is on distinct values of type.group - so no matter how many colours are specified/selected, the count will only be incremented by 1, no matter how many of the matching colours are selected. –  Mark Bannister Jan 27 '12 at 14:32
    
yep, but your IN is not based on the group column. if it's on the group it's ok :) –  Cosmin Vacaroiu Jan 27 '12 at 14:49
    
@CosminVacariou: The in condition needs to be on the type.type, not the type.group - what if there was a car that met all the other criteria but was only available in green, not red or blue? –  Mark Bannister Jan 27 '12 at 14:52
    
+1 nice solution. –  Florin Ghita Jan 27 '12 at 15:21

I think a better way of solving this would be to be specific about the types and create columns for these:

select * from car 
where type = 'SUV' 
and drive_type = '4x4' 
and (colour = 'blue' or colour = 'red') 
and origin = 'US' 
and (transmission = 'Manual' or transmission = 'Automatic') 
and fuel_type = 'diesel'

Then you can use indexes to improve the performance of the query.

share|improve this answer
select * from car c1 where c1.id in
(
  select c.id from car c
  inner join Type t on c.id = t.id_car and c.type in ('suv', '4x4', 'us', 'diesel', 'blue', 'red', 'manual', 'automatic')
  group by c.id
  having count(distinct *) > 5
)
share|improve this answer
    
ps you can't use distinct with * –  Cosmin Vacaroiu Jan 27 '12 at 14:01

You have a bad design.

Every group value shoud go into a new column.

So the type table should be:

id_car color transmission fuel origin_country etc
1      blue  automatic    gas  UK
....

The query would be:

select * 
from car join type on (car.id = type.id_car)
where color in ('red', 'blue')
and transmision in ('automatic')
and country in ('US')
etc.
share|improve this answer
    
yeah, but this isn't the case. –  Cosmin Vacaroiu Jan 27 '12 at 14:20
    
my example isn't a good one. the real design is ok in my app. –  Cosmin Vacaroiu Jan 27 '12 at 14:34
    
it's an ipothetical case? Ok, in this situation you can retain the ideea. this design is an weak EAV an will cause you problems :) –  Florin Ghita Jan 27 '12 at 14:43

This would do it:

select car.* 
from car INNER JOIN (
                     select id, count(*) countMatches
                     from car INNER JOIN type on car.id = type.id_car
                     where type in ('suv', '4x4', 'us', 'diesel','blue', 
                                    'red','manual', 'automatic')
                     group by id
                     having count(*) = 6
                    ) matches ON car.id = matches.id
share|improve this answer
    
it's not 8, it's > 5 –  aF. Jan 27 '12 at 13:45
    
> 5 still isn't correct. cuz you can have 5 from a single group of 5 ORed items. –  Cosmin Vacaroiu Jan 27 '12 at 13:47
    
@aF: Doh, thanks, updated. @ Cosmin: Based on the information you provided, this should do what you want. Your question doesn't mention anything about groups, nor does it describe the data structure. If you want a definite answer, you should provide all the relevant information in the question. –  StevieG Jan 27 '12 at 14:07
    
you can make count(distinct *) > 5 and it's done! –  aF. Jan 27 '12 at 14:12

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