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Why do I have to do

trait Compiler {
  var printInstruction: String
}
class JavaCompiler extends Compiler {
  var printInstruction = "System.out.print(arg0);"
}

instead of

trait Compiler {
  var printInstruction: String
}
class JavaCompiler extends Compiler {
  printInstruction = "System.out.print(arg0);"
}

when

trait Compiler {
  var printInstruction: String
  def printInstruction: String
}

gives compile error.

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Shouldn't you write override var printInstruction = "System.out.print(arg0);"? You are overriding property in JavaCompiler –  dmitry Jan 27 '12 at 14:00
    
He can but it's not mandatory, as printInstruction is abstract, it can be defined without an òverride`modifier. Some consider it's a good practice to add overrideothers believe it a bit useless. –  Nicolas Jan 27 '12 at 14:13
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Because you don't initialize the variable in trait Compiler. It means that you expect that anyone who extends Compile defines something that behaves like a variable.

For example the following is valid:

class Example extends Compiler {

   var _printInstruction = "foo"

   def pritnInstruction = "I don't care about setter"

   def pritnInstruction_=(pi: String) = _printInstruction = pi
}

If you want to be able to use

class JavaCompiler extends Compiler {
  printInstruction = "System.out.print(arg0);"
}

Then initialize your var in the Compilertrait:

trait Compiler {
  var printInstruction: String = _
}
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I'm not the author of this question, but may I ask some explanation? What does mean underscore in var printInstruction: String = _? –  dmitry Jan 27 '12 at 14:03
1  
_ means that you initialize the variable with a default value, depending of the type of the variable var x: Int = _ leads to x = 0; var y: String = _leads to y = null, and so on. The same as implicit initialization in java. It's most of the time a bad practice. –  Nicolas Jan 27 '12 at 14:09
    
And why was error when var is defined without default value? It was treated as abstract/unimplemented? –  dmitry Jan 27 '12 at 14:12
1  
That's it. Wihout it, you leave the implementation up to the concrete class, it can either define a var or define a setter/getter pair –  Nicolas Jan 27 '12 at 14:15
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Overriding vars is generally not something you want to do. If you want something that behaves like a var, and may even be one, you do this:

trait Compiler {
  def printInstruction: String
  def printInstruction_=(s: String): Unit
}

class JavaCompiler {
  var printInstructions = "System.out.print(arg0);"
}

Somehow I don't think that's what you intended. So... what don't you explain what you actually intend to accomplish, so we can better advise on how to do it?

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Its a spin of from stackoverflow.com/questions/9033253/… there we have the best solution to the original problem. This was just a question of why the compiler didn't chose to define var for me if left undefined. –  Farmor Jan 27 '12 at 17:47
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