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I would like to pass several characters of argv[] to a function, and then return a value.
For example:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int n1, value;
    for (i = 1; i <= n1; i++) {
        value = Convert(argv[]);
        printf("%d\n", value);
    }
}

float Convert(*argv[]) {
    int value;

    switch(*argv[]){
        case 'ABC': value = 1; break;
        case 'DEF': value = 2; break;
        case 'GHI': value = 3; break;
        default: value = 0; break;
    }
    return value;
}

I know there are syntax errors, but I don't know how to correct them.

Hope you understand what I mean, sorry for my bad English.

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6  
You should grab a C book. And read it. Twice. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 27 '12 at 13:53
1  
And re-read the answers to your previous questions, that switch doesn't stand a chance at doing what you want it to do, even if the syntax was correct. And why return a float? –  Mat Jan 27 '12 at 13:54
2  
I think Luchian is right. There's a lot that's wrong with the code. I think reading a good book is the most efficient way to get from where you are to where you're able to write simple programs in C. –  NPE Jan 27 '12 at 13:54
    
Have you tried to read what the errors says and fix them? The should be pretty obvious. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 27 '12 at 13:57

2 Answers 2

There are several errors, see the comments on the original code:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    int n1, value;
    for (i = 1; i <= n1; i++) {
        // you cannot pass it like that, if you want to pass the whole argv, it should be
        // value = Convert(argv);
        // If you want to pass one argument at a time it should be
        // value = Convert(argv[i]);
        value = Convert(argv[]);
        printf("%d\n", value);
    }
}

//If you want to pass one argument each time, the declaration should be
// int Convert(char * argv)
// Also note that you expect an int in return, not a float
float Convert(*argv[]){
    int value;

// you cannot switch on strings, only on integer types, so you need to perform if/else checks:
/*
if (strcmp(argv, "ABC") == 0) {
    value = 1;
}
else if (strcmp(argv, "DEF") == 0) {
    value = 2;
}
else if (strcmp(argv, "GHI") == 0) {
    value = 3;
}
else {
    value = 0;
}

*/
    switch(*argv[]){
    case 'ABC': value = 1;break;
    case 'DEF': value = 2;break;
    case 'GHI': value = 3;break;
    default: value = 0;break;
    }
    return value;
}
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argv is a pointer to an array of pointers to arrays of characters (char ** or char *[]). You need to deref it to obtain at least a pointer to an array of characters (a C string), char *.

char *param = argv[1];

You can slice a string up by duplicating it, if you want to use it easily with C string manipulation functions.

char *first_three = strndup(argv[1], 3);

String literals are enclosed with double quotes:

"ABC" // not 'ABC'

String comparison is required on C strings, they're not primitives in C:

if (!strcmp("ABC", first_three)) return 1;

That's a fairly exhaustive list of the serious mistakes in your program and should get you started on the road to recovery.

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