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Goolge comes up with a lot of comparisions but not on what I am looking for:

What is better if I want to iterate through a splitted String

String[] flagArr = flags.split(";");
for (String f: flagArr) {
    // some stuff
}

OR

for (String f: flags.split(";")) {
    // some stuff
}

With the second pice of code I wonder if the compiler is smart enough to do the split only once

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Jan 29 '12 at 6:15

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Why not run a short benchmark on your own? Just run both version with the same String n times (with sufficently large n) and track time or memory usage whatever you are interested in. –  pintxo Jan 27 '12 at 13:58
    
I thought about a benchmark measuring the time. But Then I figured asking a question is the better choice because getting more knowledge about what Java does internally enhances my programming skills. In addition other people might have the same question. –  Thorsten Niehues Jan 28 '12 at 16:00
    
You can debug both versions. That is find out what happens back stage. –  Octavian Damiean Jan 28 '12 at 23:02
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can check the generated bytecode, but I'm pretty sure they'll both do the same thing. Why would the second one be any different?

EDIT: As you can see, both ways only call split() once.

The bytecode for the first one:

public class javatesting.JavaTesting extends java.lang.Object{
public javatesting.JavaTesting();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   ldc     #2; //String 1;2;3
   2:   astore_1
   3:   aload_1
   4:   ldc     #3; //String ;
   6:   invokevirtual   #4; //Method java/lang/String.split:(Ljava/lang/String;)
[Ljava/lang/String;
   9:   astore_2
   10:  aload_2
   11:  astore_3
   12:  aload_3
   13:  arraylength
   14:  istore  4
   16:  iconst_0
   17:  istore  5
   19:  iload   5
   21:  iload   4
   23:  if_icmpge       41
   26:  aload_3
   27:  iload   5
   29:  aaload
   30:  astore  6
   32:  aconst_null
   33:  astore  6
   35:  iinc    5, 1
   38:  goto    19
   41:  return

}

And the bytecode for the second one:

public class javatesting.JavaTesting extends java.lang.Object{
public javatesting.JavaTesting();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   ldc     #2; //String 1;2;3
   2:   astore_1
   3:   aload_1
   4:   ldc     #3; //String ;
   6:   invokevirtual   #4; //Method java/lang/String.split:(Ljava/lang/String;)
[Ljava/lang/String;
   9:   astore_2
   10:  aload_2
   11:  arraylength
   12:  istore_3
   13:  iconst_0
   14:  istore  4
   16:  iload   4
   18:  iload_3
   19:  if_icmpge       37
   22:  aload_2
   23:  iload   4
   25:  aaload
   26:  astore  5
   28:  aconst_null
   29:  astore  5
   31:  iinc    4, 1
   34:  goto    16
   37:  return

}
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Thank you - exactly answered the question. That was what I was looking for. –  Thorsten Niehues Jan 28 '12 at 16:16
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It doesn't matter at all. Don't waste time with such type of optimization.

EDIT: If you ever want to care about such thing than you might use the second option since the array with the splits will exist only inside the for loop scope.

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I totally disagree. Doing something in one other the other way may result in a huge performance difference. See this link for example: roseindia.net/javatutorials/appending_strings.shtml –  Thorsten Niehues Jan 28 '12 at 16:03
    
Yes, sometimes it matters and sometimes it doesn't. In this case it doesn't and that was my point. –  Jan Zyka Jan 31 '12 at 14:46
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If you really want to see the difference in bytecode, use javap -c. Compiled with the Eclipse compiler, the first version (with a local variable in the source code) gives this:

public static void test(java.lang.String);
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   ldc #16; //String ;
   3:   invokevirtual   #18; //Method java/lang/String.split:(Ljava/lang/String;)[Ljava/lang/String;
   6:   astore_1
   7:   aload_1
   8:   dup
   9:   astore  5
   11:  arraylength
   12:  istore  4
   14:  iconst_0
   15:  istore_3
   16:  goto    27
   19:  aload   5
   21:  iload_3
   22:  aaload
   23:  astore_2
   24:  iinc    3, 1
   27:  iload_3
   28:  iload   4
   30:  if_icmplt   19
   33:  return
}

And the second:

public static void test(java.lang.String);
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   ldc #16; //String ;
   3:   invokevirtual   #18; //Method java/lang/String.split:(Ljava/lang/String;)[Ljava/lang/String;
   6:   dup
   7:   astore  4
   9:   arraylength
   10:  istore_3
   11:  iconst_0
   12:  istore_2
   13:  goto    24
   16:  aload   4
   18:  iload_2
   19:  aaload
   20:  astore_1
   21:  iinc    2, 1
   24:  iload_2
   25:  iload_3
   26:  if_icmplt   16
   29:  return
}

As you can see (if you can read this), the first variant does use an extra local variable slot (astore_1/aload_1 at the beginning). However (a) even if the bytecode was interpreted, the overhead of this would be negligible (it's just copying the reference) and (b) any JIT compiler will be able to optimize this, whether you have done some static bytecode optimization beforehand or not: local variable (1) is never subsequently used.

Local variables in the source code are mainly used for clarity, and for being able to re-use intermediate results. Fundamentally, the second variant (without an explicit local variable) will not let you re-use the result of split further down in your method (or even directly within the loop), whereas you could when naming your local variable in the code.

With the second pice of code I wonder if the compiler is smart enough to do the split only once

The only difference between your two methods is the explicit declaration of a local variable in the source code.

In both cases, for (String f: flags.split(";")) { } is syntactic sugar (except that neither local variables are accessible) equivalent to :

int _hidden_i = 0;
for (String[] _hidden_arr=flags.split(";"); _hidden_i<_hidden_arr.length; _hidden_i++){
    String f = _hidden_arr[_hidden_i];
    // some stuff
}

The points to note are that:

  • With this notation, _hidden_i is never exposed, so you can never allocate something into _hidden_arr[_hidden_i].
  • Even a naive source-to-bytecode compiler knows that both _hidden_arr and _hidden_i will never be used again, so it doesn't copy them for further use.

What would have been fundamentally different would have been:

for (var i = 0; i < flags.split(";").length; i++) {
    String f = flags.split(";")[i];
}

In the for(;;) notation, the first part is always executed once. The second expression is always executed before entering the loop block (to test whether or not to run it). The last is always executing after running the loop block (unless break is used).

You would generally want to avoid method calls that are potentially heavy in the second part, especially when it's always going to be the same result.

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Thank you - very good background knowledge. –  Thorsten Niehues Jan 28 '12 at 16:15
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I think the compiler will optimize that. It might depend on the Java provider you hae chosen (sun, ibm, etc...) but this is so simple I would be surprised if every compiler did not.

Perhaps create a really large flags string and do some simple performance testing?

But, since this is easy, why not just do your first option....

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I'm quite certain the the split will be done only one. Internally this code will be translated into a loop with an iterator, so the compiler will do the split once, create the resulting collection, then create the iterator over that collection.

The iterator would not be pointing to the right place if the split were to be repeated.

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Try this:

public double calculateRunTime()
{
    long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

    split();

    long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

    return endTime - startTime;
}
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