Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's the deal. I have a large character array and am trying to manipulate it. Here's some code I was using to test the idea:

#include <stdio.h>

char r[65536],*e=r;

main() {
    e+=8;
    while(*e) {
        *e+=1;
        e+=5;
        *e-=1;
        e-=1;
    }
    *e+=1;
    printf("%i",*e);
    printf(" %c",e);
}

What it's supposed to do is:

  1. Set the first element to 8
  2. Then, while the current element is not zero,
    1. Move to the next cell
    2. Add 5 to it
    3. Move back
    4. Subtract one. (This repeats 8 times because the while test will fail when it has subtracted the last one)
  3. Display the location of the pointer
  4. Display the contents of the array that the pointer points to (I hope)

What it does:

1 Φ

as opposed to

40 (   

^^ 8 x 5 = 40, so that's what it should display.

Any tips/suggestions/criticism accepted.

share|improve this question
    
you almost got it but when you define a pointer with *e you dont need to refer to it as *e just e and that gives you the memory address of the pointer. When you *e it again like with the *e += 8 you are dereferencing it and adding 8 to the ASCII value char that was there making it some other char. –  L7ColWinters Jan 27 '12 at 14:01
3  
Note that main should return an int (normally 0). –  undur_gongor Jan 27 '12 at 14:38
    
You should also initialize your array. There is no guarantee that *e is 8 after *e+=8; –  user606723 Jan 27 '12 at 17:31
2  
@user606723: There is a guarantee. Only automatic variables (non-static "locals") are not automatically initialized. –  undur_gongor Jan 27 '12 at 19:06
    
global variables are initialized? You learn something new everyday. –  user606723 Jan 27 '12 at 20:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You're dereferencing exactly where you should not and vice versa. What you meant to do was:

*e+=8;
while(*e) {
    e+=1;
    *e+=5;
    e-=1;
    *e-=1;
}
*e+=1;
printf("%d",e - r); //index
printf(" %p",e); //pointer value      
printf(" %c",*e); //pointee value

* retrieves the value the pointer points to.

share|improve this answer
3  
Not "exactly". The control condition of the while is correct. –  undur_gongor Jan 27 '12 at 14:31

"Set the first element to 8" would be

*e = 8;

"Move to the next cell" would be

e += 1;

and so on.

With e you are accessing the pointer, the address. Incrementing/decrementing it will move the pointer forth and back.

With *e you access the value it is pointing to (dereference it).

You are using it the other way around most of the times.

Remark: Note that in the declaration of e you have to write char *e = r; to initialize the pointer (not the value). Here the * specifies the type of e. The declaration reads: e is a pointer to char and its value is (the address of) e --- it is similar to char *r; r = e;.

share|improve this answer
    
So, *e instead of e? I'm really confused. Does the * part refer to the value or the location? EDIT: It works, I switched out all *es with es and vice versa. Thanks! –  itdoesntwork Jan 27 '12 at 14:02
3  
e is the location. *e is the value. –  asaelr Jan 27 '12 at 14:04

*e dereferences the pointer; that is, it manipulates the value pointed to. Manipulating the pointer itself means manipulating e directly.

When you do e+=5, you're moving the pointer ahead by 5 spaces, if you do *e+=5, then you add 5 to the value pointed to by the pointer.

share|improve this answer

You misunderstand pointer arithmetic and dereference.

*e is used to access what e points to, so *e += 1 increases the value of what e points to, not goes to the next address. Also, e += 8 increases the actual pointer, and e will now point at the ninth entry in the array.

share|improve this answer

You're confusing your dereferencing. The * operator when calling the pointer gives you the data stored at the location. Without it gives you the address.

share|improve this answer

Possible solution :

#include <stdio.h>

char  r[65536];
char* e = r;

main() {
    *e = 8;
    while(*e) {
        e++;
        *e+=5;
        e--;
        *e-=1;
    }
    e++;
    printf("position : %i\n",e-r);
    printf("value : %c\n",*e);
}

You simply mixed * and &.

If P is a pointer, then *P is the value pointed by the pointer. If V is a value, then &V is the address where the value is stored.

share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>

char r[65536], *e=r;

int main()
{
    *e = 8;
    while (*e) {
        e++;
        *e += 5;
        e--;
        *e -= 1;
    }
    e++;
    printf("%p %c\n", e, *e);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.