Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a git branch that will work independent of the master branch. I want all the code that is present in the master till now, but any further changes in the master should not reflect in the branch and any changes in the branch should not reflect in the master.

I used this command to create branch:

git branch test

But any file I add in master, I can see in test. And any new file added in test, I can see in master. How to avoid this? I did not use any --track option while creating the branch.

share|improve this question
2  
That's not supposed to happen at all. Could you detail a bit more how you're doing your commits and branch switching? –  Mat Jan 27 '12 at 14:18
    
Are you sure you are changing branch through the git checkout command? –  Momhain Jan 27 '12 at 14:19
2  
Do you commit your changes before switching? –  Mat Jan 27 '12 at 14:28
4  
Then the behavior is expected. Commit if you want to save. Use git stash if you don't want to commit yet. –  Mat Jan 27 '12 at 14:31
1  
Changes aren't put into a branch until you commit them. You're only making changes in your "working copy" which is a separate entity from any branch that you're committing to –  Gareth Jan 27 '12 at 14:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you've asked for is exactly what git branch test does (a point from which the two histories are no longer shared). There is two levels of confusion here though:

  • When you git add newfile, you are adding it to the index, but not committing it or updating any branch with it's contents. When you check out a new branch then, as long as there is no conflict, git will not reset those changes from the index. This is a desirable behavior, for example if you are working on another branch and want to take only a subset of the uncommitted changes over to another branch. If you git commit the state of the index on your original branch, the index won't retain those changes when you go back to the test branch.

  • When you move between trees that have new files added or removed, a git checkout will not necessarily remove them from the filesystem (if there is a reset operation). Then you may "see" these files when you switch branches, e.g. in the output of ls or git status -- but they are "untracked" and git will not try to do anything with them (git commit -a, for example, will not add this file to the index before writing a new tree). This is nothing to worry about, but if you're OCD about it, you can delete them (or use git clean).

share|improve this answer
1  
More detailed than my answer. +1. Note, it is not OCD. It is CDO, ie like OCD but in alphabetical order. As it should be. (Sorry, it is Friday, couldn't resist) –  VonC Jan 27 '12 at 15:04

I think what you wanted was:

git checkout --orphan somebranch

this will create a somebranch with no history whatsoever, you can add which files you want to that one, and they might differ 100% from your previous branches.

share|improve this answer
git branch test
git add .
git checkout test
git checkout master

As long as you don't commit, you will see your working tree and your index (which references what you have added) in both branches test and master.

git checkout test
git commit -m "files for test"
git checkout master

Then you won't see in master the files you have just committed in test.
You new branch test will have recording a new commit (with new content), independent from master.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.