Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

as already explained I want to achieve, that when the user is editing a date within a JXDatePicker, he can choose, weather he types it again in the same format, which is by default dd.MM.yyyy or just dd.MM.yy. When he uses the short form I want the Picker to choose the current century.

Example:

27.01.2012 edited to 27.01.10 should result in 27.01.2010

as well as:

27.01.2012 edited to 27.01.2010 should also result in 27.01.2010

By default the JXDatePicker handels it the following way:

27.01.2012 edited to 27.01.10 results in 27.01.0010

Which is not really the way I wanted it to work. After some short research I found the following Method in SimpleDateFormat

/**
 * Sets the 100-year period 2-digit years will be interpreted as being in
 * to begin on the date the user specifies.
 *
 * @param startDate During parsing, two digit years will be placed in the range
 * <code>startDate</code> to <code>startDate + 100 years</code>.
 */
public void set2DigitYearStart(Date startDate)

On first view this sounded exactly like what I need. So I tested it and unfortunatly it didnt work like I hoped it would. This is because I want to use dd.MM.yyyy as format to display dates and also want it to be displayed like that in editmode. For example when the user klicks on a date like 27.01.2012, I also want it to be like that in editmode, too and not just the short form: 27.01.12.

My Problem now is, that set2DigitYearStart(Date) unfortunatly only works, when I choose to use the shortform in editmode. I made a small example to show this case (SwingX Library is required, because of jxdatepicker and can be found be here).

public class DatePickerExample extends JPanel
{
  static JFrame frame;

  public DatePickerExample()
  {
    JXDatePicker picker = new JXDatePicker();
    JTextField field = new JTextField( 10 );

    add( field );
    add( picker );

    final Calendar instance = Calendar.getInstance();
    instance.set( 2012, 01, 26 );
    Date date = instance.getTime();
    picker.setDate( date );

    //    SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat( "dd.MM.yy" );//Works, but I wonna display and edit it with dd.MM.yyyy
    SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat( "dd.MM.yyyy" );
    final Date startDate = new Date( 0 );//01.01.1970
    format.set2DigitYearStart( startDate );

    picker.setFormats( format );
  }

  public static void main( String[] args )
  {
    frame = new JFrame();
    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation( JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE );
    frame.setBounds( 400, 400, 400, 400 );
    frame.setLayout( new BorderLayout() );
    frame.add( new DatePickerExample() );
    frame.setVisible( true );
  }
}

Anyone already had the same requirement and can tell me how to make this work? Any ideas are welcome. Thank you very much in advance. ymene

share|improve this question
1  
"I want the Picker to choose the current century." Ah, preparing for the Y2.1K bug early, I see. ;) – Andrew Thompson Jan 27 '12 at 14:35
    
Haha, got me! Eventhough its 2012, there is nothing wrong with considering how the software would work in future! :P – crusam Jan 30 '12 at 12:43

Final (hopefully :)

Summary of the first edit:

  • DatePickerFormatter already implements a lookup strategy (or CompoundFormat, as suggested by @Robin)
  • the lookup sequence for parsing is configurable by client code
  • the idea is to try parsing starting with the first (typically the "longest"), if that fails try the next (typically "not-so-long") and so on until succeeded or a parseException is thrown
  • for year parsing, SimpleDateFormat has rules that conflict with that longest-first lookup: it requires that "yy" is tried before "yyyy"
  • doing so in datePicker has the unwanted side-effect of always showing the date with the short year format

The reason is DatePickerFormatter: it doesn't allow to specify the formatting format (simply uses the first). The way out is a custom DatePickerFormatter, which supports it (in the snippet, it's hardcoded to use the second):

SimpleDateFormat longFormat = new SimpleDateFormat( "dd.MM.yyyy" );
SimpleDateFormat shortFormat = new SimpleDateFormat( "dd.MM.yy" );
Date startDate = new Date( 0 );//01.01.1970
shortFormat.set2DigitYearStart( startDate );

DatePickerFormatter formatter = new DatePickerFormatter(
// invers sequence for parsing to satisfy the year parsing rules
        new DateFormat[] {shortFormat, longFormat}) {

            @Override
            public String valueToString(Object value) throws ParseException {
                if (value == null) return null;
                return getFormats()[1].format(value);
            }
        } ;
DefaultFormatterFactory factory = new DefaultFormatterFactory(formatter );
picker.getEditor().setFormatterFactory(factory);

Not entirely sure if we should support configuring the formatter in the base class. The DatePickerFormatter is a bit strange beast, not extending InternalFormatter and with the lookup process being a bit in competition with a FormatterFactory...

Original

It's not exactly the datePicker which handles it that way, it's the core formatting (as D1e already noted). None of the default format/ter/s support two formats at the same time: to see, try to achieve your goal with a core JFormattedTextField :-)

The way out might be a FormatterFactory: it allows to use different formats, depending on context: display and edit - the latter is used when the field is focused, the former at all other times. As the picker's editor is a JFormattedTextField, you can configure it directly (instead of using the setFormats methods)

    SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat( "dd.MM.yyyy" );
    SimpleDateFormat editFormat = new SimpleDateFormat( "dd.MM.yy" );

    final Date startDate = new Date( 0 );//01.01.1970
    instance.setTime(startDate);
    editFormat.set2DigitYearStart( instance.getTime() );
    DefaultFormatterFactory factory = new DefaultFormatterFactory(
            new DatePickerFormatter(new DateFormat[] {format}),
            new DatePickerFormatter(new DateFormat[] {format}),
            new DatePickerFormatter(new DateFormat[] {editFormat})
            );
    picker.getEditor().setFormatterFactory(factory);

Edit

head banging after reading Robin's recent answer (+1!) - at last, embarassingly after years and years, I understand what SwingX' DatePickerFormatter is trying to do: that is to support a lookup chain of formatters (from longer to shorter), the longest used after committing, the shorter to ease the typing by users.

Unfortunately that doesn't work as intuitively expected. Given a sequence of formats, longer to shorter (and appropriately configured to the century):

"yyyy", "yy"

and given input

"10"

feels like being passed on from first to second, resulting in

 2010

but isn't. As documented (who reads documention ... lazy me, cough ...) in SimpleDateFormat

Year: [ ... ] For parsing, if the number of pattern letters is more than 2, the year is interpreted literally, regardless of the number of digits. So using the pattern "MM/dd/yyyy", "01/11/12" parses to Jan 11, 12 A.D.

At the end of the day - as DatePickerFormatter tries to support that lookup but isn't successful - this might be considered a SwingX problem, after all :-)

share|improve this answer
    
kleopatra! I hoped with putting a swingx tag in it, I would gain your attention :D. First of all thank you for your answer and sorry that I wasnt able to comment it already earlier. Unfortunatly I already tried it the way you suggested as well. I know this works perfectly fine. Only thing about it that I dont like is the following: When the user clicks on the textfield while it displayed 27.01.2012, it changes in editmode (because of editformat) to 27.01.12, before the user started changing the date on his own. I would prefer that it still shows 27.01.2012, while he is editing it. – crusam Jan 30 '12 at 11:04
    
do you may have any simple suggestion how to achieve this, or do I really have to overwrite the involved JFormattedTextFields to format those strings on my own? I also noticed I can add several formats as editformat. But unfortunatly that didnt help either. – crusam Jan 30 '12 at 11:06
    
as already noted in my answer: that's core behaviour, well outside the control of SwingX. Didn't really dig, but I think you generally can't have both - how should the formatter know which to use? You might try to implement a formatter on top of two formats .. please let us know when you succeed, might be a nice contribution to SwingX :-) – kleopatra Jan 30 '12 at 11:39
    
That`s an interesting idea. Since I am running out of time, I'll go with the default behaviour first, but your idea is noted and I'll let you know, as soon as I have a satisfying solution :-) – crusam Jan 30 '12 at 12:42
    
@kleopatra take a look at my answer for that composite formatter. – Robin Aug 25 '12 at 19:38

I am not quite aware of JXDatePicker specifically, but if the concrete functionality you want to simulate is: Both user inputs 27.01.2010 and 27.01.10 independently should result in 27.01.2010

Then this will work:

import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException {
        String inputLiteralDateYY = "27.01.10"; //Also works with "27.01.97"
        String inputLiteralDateYYYY = "27.01.2010"; //Also works with "27.01.1997"

        DateFormat dfYYYY = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.MM.yyyy");
        DateFormat dfYY = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.MM.yy");


        Date dateFromYY = dfYY.parse(inputLiteralDateYY);
        Date dateFromYYYY = dfYY.parse(inputLiteralDateYYYY);

        String outputLiteralDateFromYY = dfYYYY.format(dateFromYY);
        String outputLiteralDateFromYYYY = dfYYYY.format(dateFromYYYY);

        System.out.println(outputLiteralDateFromYY);
        System.out.println(outputLiteralDateFromYYYY);
    }
}

The thing is that first you parse input with "dd.MM.yy" pattern and then return it formatting with "dd.MM.yyyy" pattern.

Hope this helps or helps applying this to your scenario.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry for my late reply, but I am not sure, if I can or should get in between the components validation/formatting process, eventhough I also already considered to overwrite commitEdit of JFormattedTextField to differ on my own, which format is appropiate to use. So I keep this as very last solution in mind. Thank you :) – crusam Jan 30 '12 at 10:57

kleopatra already explained on how to set a Format on the date picker. For this use-case, I would apply a combination of a CompositeFormat and ParseAllFormat instead of having a separate format for editing and regular mode to avoid changing the String when you start editing (as you already noticed).

Composite format

The composite format, as the name suggests, is a composite implementation of the Format class but only for the parsing. For the formatting, it uses one Format. This allows the user to input his/her date in many forms, while it is formatted consistently by using one specific format to format.

You can obtain this behavior as well by writing one more sophisticated Format. But in this case, it is easier to just use the formatting/parsing functionality offered by the SimpleDateFormat class of the JDK.

import java.text.FieldPosition;
import java.text.Format;
import java.text.ParsePosition;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

/**
 * <p>Composite form of {@link java.text.Format Format}. It uses multiple formats for parsing, and
 * only one format for formatting.</p>
 *
 * <p>A possible use-case is the formatting of user input (e.g. in a {@code JFormattedTextField}).
 * Multiple formats for parsing allows accepting multiple forms of user input without having to
 * write a complicated format.</p>
 */
public class CompositeFormat extends Format {

  private List<Format> fFormats = new ArrayList<>();
  private Format fFormattingFormat;

  /**
   * Create a new
   */
  public CompositeFormat() {
  }

  /**
   * Add a format to this composite format
   *
   * @param aFormat The format to add
   */
  public void addFormat( Format aFormat ) {
    assertNotNull( aFormat, "You cannot add a null Format" );
    if ( !( fFormats.contains( aFormat ) ) ) {
      fFormats.add( aFormat );
    }
  }

  /**
   * Remove a format from this composite format
   *
   * @param aFormat The format to remove
   */
  public void removeFormat( Format aFormat ) {
    assertNotNull( aFormat, "You cannot remove a null Format" );
    fFormats.remove( aFormat );
    updateFormattingFormat();
  }

  /**
   * Sets <code>aFormat</code> as the format which will be used for formatting the
   * objects. The format will also be added to the list of available formats.
   * @param aFormat The format which will be used for formatting
   */
  public void setFormattingFormat( Format aFormat ){
    assertNotNull( aFormat, "Formatting format may not be null" );
    addFormat( aFormat );
    fFormattingFormat = aFormat;
  }

  private void assertNotNull( Object aObjectToCheck, String aMessage ) {
    if ( aObjectToCheck == null ) {
      throw new NullPointerException( aMessage );
    }
  }

  private void updateFormattingFormat(){
    if ( !( fFormats.contains( fFormattingFormat ) ) ){
      fFormattingFormat = null;
      if ( !( fFormats.isEmpty() ) ){
        fFormattingFormat = fFormats.iterator().next();
      }
    }
  }

  @Override
  public StringBuffer format( Object obj, StringBuffer toAppendTo, FieldPosition pos ) {
    assertNotNull( fFormattingFormat, "Set a formatting format before using this format" );
    return fFormattingFormat.format( obj, toAppendTo, pos );
  }

  @Override
  public Object parseObject( String source, ParsePosition pos ) {
    if ( fFormats.isEmpty() ){
      throw new UnsupportedOperationException( "Add at least one format before using this composite format" );
    }
    Format formatToUse = fFormats.iterator().next();
    int maxIndex = pos.getIndex();
    for ( Format format : fFormats ) {
      ParsePosition tempPos = new ParsePosition( pos.getIndex() );
      tempPos.setErrorIndex( pos.getErrorIndex() );
      format.parseObject( source, tempPos );
      if ( tempPos.getIndex() > maxIndex ){
        maxIndex = tempPos.getIndex();
        formatToUse = format;
        if( maxIndex == source.length() ){
          //found a format which parses the whole string
          break;
        }
      }
    }
    return formatToUse.parseObject( source, pos );
  }
}

ParseAllFormat

Typically for user input you want that the whole user input can be formatted/parsed to avoid that the user can input a String which is half-correct. The ParseAllFormat is a decorator for a regular Format which throws ParseExceptions when only part of the String can be parsed.

import java.text.AttributedCharacterIterator;
import java.text.FieldPosition;
import java.text.Format;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.ParsePosition;

/**
 * <p>Decorator for a {@link Format Format} which only accepts values which can be completely parsed
 * by the delegate format. If the value can only be partially parsed, the decorator will refuse to
 * parse the value.</p>
 */
public class ParseAllFormat extends Format {
  private final Format fDelegate;

  /**
   * Decorate <code>aDelegate</code> to make sure if parser everything or nothing
   *
   * @param aDelegate The delegate format
   */
  public ParseAllFormat( Format aDelegate ) {
    fDelegate = aDelegate;
  }

  @Override
  public StringBuffer format( Object obj, StringBuffer toAppendTo, FieldPosition pos ) {
    return fDelegate.format( obj, toAppendTo, pos );
  }

  @Override
  public AttributedCharacterIterator formatToCharacterIterator( Object obj ) {
    return fDelegate.formatToCharacterIterator( obj );
  }

  @Override
  public Object parseObject( String source, ParsePosition pos ) {
    int initialIndex = pos.getIndex();
    Object result = fDelegate.parseObject( source, pos );
    if ( result != null && pos.getIndex() < source.length() ) {
      int errorIndex = pos.getIndex();
      pos.setIndex( initialIndex );
      pos.setErrorIndex( errorIndex );
      return null;
    }
    return result;
  }

  @Override
  public Object parseObject( String source ) throws ParseException {
    //no need to delegate the call, super will call the parseObject( source, pos ) method
    return super.parseObject( source );
  }
}

The combination of these both classes allows for the following code

import java.text.Format;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;

public class FormattingDemo {

  private static Format createCompositeDateFormat(){
    Format formattingFormat = new ParseAllFormat( new SimpleDateFormat( "dd.MM.yyyy" ) );
    SimpleDateFormat shortFormat = new SimpleDateFormat( "dd.MM.yy" );
    Format otherFormat = new ParseAllFormat( shortFormat );

    CompositeFormat compositeFormat = new CompositeFormat();
    compositeFormat.addFormat( otherFormat );
    compositeFormat.addFormat( formattingFormat );
    compositeFormat.setFormattingFormat( formattingFormat );
    return compositeFormat;
  }

  public static void main( String[] args ) throws ParseException {
    Format dateFormat = createCompositeDateFormat();
    System.out.println( dateFormat.parseObject( "27.01.2010" ) );
    System.out.println( dateFormat.parseObject( "27.01.10" ) );
    System.out.println( dateFormat.parseObject( "27.01.2012" ) );
    System.out.println(dateFormat.format( dateFormat.parseObject( "27.01.2010" ) ));
    System.out.println(dateFormat.format( dateFormat.parseObject( "27.01.10" ) ));
    System.out.println(dateFormat.format( dateFormat.parseObject( "27.01.2012" ) ));
  }
}

resulting in the following output

Wed Jan 27 00:00:00 CET 2010
Wed Jan 27 00:00:00 CET 2010
Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 CET 2012
27.01.2010
27.01.2010
27.01.2012

Note that there is a small catch for which I did not found a decent solution. The order in which you add Format instances to the CompositeFormat is also the order in which they are evaluated for the parsing. In this case you need to add them in the correct order as even the new SimpleDateFormat( "dd.MM.yyyy" ) seems to accept the input string 27.01.10 and can parse the whole String to a Date object equivalent to 27.01.0010.

share|improve this answer
    
daaarn ... cough .. see my edit (+1! hopefully this helps to get it right in SwingX) – kleopatra Aug 26 '12 at 10:44
    
@kleopatra I had the same issue with the parsing of the years ... the main reason I added the note about the order of the formats in the composite format – Robin Aug 26 '12 at 12:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.