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I have an empty list, and, in a special case, want to append a tuple to the list. How can I do that?

I tried several approaches:

case ReqFilePath of
    "style.css" ->
        ResponseHeaders = [{"Content-Type", "text/css"}];
    _Else ->
        ResponseHeaders = []
end,


case filelib:is_file(File) of
    true ->
        {ok, Content} = file:read_file(File),
        {output, Content, ResponseHeaders}; % Complains ResponseHeaders is not safe
    false ->
        not_found
end.

This does not work either, since the variable is already set. When I initialize ResponseHeaders = [] first, and then try to add a value to it

ResponseHeaders = lists:append(ResponseHeaders, [{"Content-Type", "text/css"}]);

I get a match error. How do you do this normally in Erlang?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The usual way to do this in erlang is just to use another variable:

ResponseHeaders = [{"Content-Type", "text/css"}],
[...]
ResponseHeaders2 = ResponseHeaders ++ [{new_thing}]

Or you could make a function that builds the ResponseHeaders for you:

ResponseHeaders = build_headers(ReqFilePath).

build_headers("skin.css") -> [{"Content-Type", "text/css"}];
build_headers(_) -> [].

Don't forget to change your mindset to the erlang way! ;)

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I'd definitely recommend the approach used here where you have a separate function to build the headers for you. Often the code becomes much clearer if you cut it into small pieces like that. –  I GIVE CRAP ANSWERS Jan 27 '12 at 16:21

Another solution is to use the fact that case ... of is an expression:

ResponseHeaders = case ReqFilePath of
    "style.css" ->
        [{"Content-Type", "text/css"}];
    _Else ->
        []
end,
case filelib:is_file(File) of
    true ->
        {ok, Content} = file:read_file(File),
        {output, Content, ResponseHeaders};
    false ->
        not_found
end.

And that should avoid any complaining. Note that I do not disagree with the suggestion to use a function, but I felt like I should explain that the 'unsafe' problem comes from the fact that you're using variables created within conditional branches of the case ... of.

Even though all the branches define the variable, the compiler still complains. By defining the variable outside of it, you solve the problem.

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I resolved this by extracting the case statement out of the function into a separate function:

get_response_headers(ReqFilePath) ->
    io:format("~p", [ReqFilePath]),
    case ReqFilePath of
        ["skin.css"] ->
            [{"Content-Type", "text/css"}];
        _Else ->
            []
    end.

And now I can get them by calling:

ResponseHeaders = get_response_headers(ReqFilePath)
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