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I am feeling rather impish about this, so please don't think I would seriously try this as I know from bitter experience the strengths of a static type checking system.

But, as for a concept, would it be possible to basically do C# in a completely dynamic way, throwing the static type checker to one side and saying "pah, you're so old fashioned!".

I have recently had great experience of IronPython and F#, but I feel truly at home in a C based language.

How far can one take C# on the road to dynamics? I recently wrote an XML to ExpandoObject parser and that was great, it felt like javascript prototyping.

How optimised is the dynamic stuff, is it as quick as some of the real Dynamic programming language environments out there such as NodeJs and CPython?

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An odd, arguably pointless, but thoroughly intriguing question! –  ColinE Jan 27 '12 at 14:38
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Many programs in .NET 1.0 were written like that. –  leppie Jan 27 '12 at 14:38
    
I'm also interested in hearing what the experts have to say about this, specifically around how optimized the dynamic language runtime is. –  Loathian Jan 27 '12 at 14:54
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+1 for overcoming impishness. These 'crazy' though experiments often open you up to new ideas and patterns. –  EBarr Jan 27 '12 at 14:55
    
@leppie Yeah, I remember those days well. I felt like a pirate :) –  WeNeedAnswers Jan 27 '12 at 22:33
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3 Answers

would it be possible to basically do C# in a completely dynamic way?

Sure, why not? Just type everything as "dynamic".

I have recently had great experience of IronPython and F#

I note that F# is not a dynamically typed language; it is an implicitly typed statically typed language. Just because you don't see the type checking does not mean it isn't there.

How optimised is the dynamic stuff?

It's pretty optimized for speed but heavy on the memory use and code size. We build a cache on every call site. The second time you hit a call site it should be very fast indeed, but you pay a memory cost for that.

is it as quick as some of the real Dynamic programming language environments out there such as NodeJs and CPython?

Try both, measure them, and then you'll know.

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Yes F# isn't dynamic, but you can do some nice things with it that I miss in C#, sometimes I think that it is dynamic by the way the type system behaves. Not got time for the measurements, too busy getting bogged down in boring boring tiered applications. Have got a lot of time for NodeJS, new kid on the block, finding the whole concept of Javascript on the server to be "supping with the devil" but it seems to work very well, all be it in a tardy prototyped Dynamic Language. Thanks for your response Eric :) –  WeNeedAnswers Jan 27 '12 at 21:45
    
Hey Eric, been reading about the web for some knowledge of C#/.net in the Windows 8 environment (slide panel (Metro) thing aside), you got any news you would like/allowed/can share...I am trying to steal a march here on getting up to speed with Dynamics, is the future looking Dynamic for C#? –  WeNeedAnswers Jan 27 '12 at 22:06
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@WeNeedAnswers: The purpose of the dynamic feature in C# is to enable better interop with languages (IronPython), runtime environments (JavaScript/HTML) and legacy object models (Office) that assume that the caller can do dynamic invocation. C# is a statically typed language first, and we intend to keep it that way. The "dynamic" feature was specifically designed so that you can use it narrowly without the disease that is runtime type checking infecting the rest of your program. –  Eric Lippert Jan 28 '12 at 0:07
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@WeNeedAnswers: We got that feedback a lot. But we get that feedback every time we add a powerful feature: "I am going to use this feature correctly, but I worry that my dumb coworkers who are not as smart as me are going to use it incorrectly and then I'm going to have to clean up their mess." At some point you have to trust that people are going to be judicious in their use of powerful features. –  Eric Lippert Jan 30 '12 at 14:49
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@WeNeedAnswers: As for it being a "bad thing" -- it's a bad thing when the designer's choices do not allow for needed flexibility. Consider the choice to only support single inheritance of classes; though that is a good choice for many reasons, it gets in the way when you want to have base classes MilitaryVehicle and CivilianVehicle, and base classes LandVehicle, MarineVehicle and AirVehicle. Those are reasonable targets for an "is a kind of" relationship, but you only get to have one, not two. –  Eric Lippert Jan 30 '12 at 14:52
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Pretty much. Of course, at any point where you interface with other code (including the FCL) that expects particular types, you'll have to cast to the type expected. But if you were really bullish about this you could create some methods like:

public static object IntegerAdd(object x, object y)
{
  return Convert.ToInt32(x) + Convert.ToInt32(y);
}

Now from the rest of your code the fact that there's some static typing going on need never upset you!

I have recently had great experience of IronPython and F#,

F# is a bit more like really heavy use of var and really heavy use of type inference, than it is like the use of dynamic and late-binding. It's not rare for some C# code (particularly with heavy use of linq) to do quite a lot without a single explicitly declared type, but to be statically-typed through and through, and that'd be a closer comparison.

How far can one take C# on the road to dynamics? I recently wrote an XML to ExpandoObject parser and that was great, it felt like javascript prototyping.

If you wrote it because you enjoyed experimenting with this approach, then fantastic.

If you wrote it because you needed something it gave, then also fantastic.

And if you wrote it because you needed something it gave, and you enjoyed experimenting with the approach, then bloody brilliant! What more can you ask for in a job?

If you're using it to shy away from C#'s strengths toward javascript's strengths, then I'd suggest caution. We're a long way now from static typing being "old fashioned". Both approaches have their strengths. I'm not saying that to be diplomatic, I really think they do. C# offering a mixture of both means it can benefit from some of the strengths of dynamic typing despite generally being a strongly typed language. It's an expressive and efficient combination, and there's no need to shoot it in one leg because you like the other leg better.

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Great answer, really enjoyed reading your post. I would never attempt anything that requires real Engineering techniques in anything less than a static language. It just gets too messy in Dynamic Languages. Although I have been tinkering with NodeJS and it feels good. Come to the conclusion that it might become a "glue" environment, bit like the old days of Perl. And no, not shying away from C#, it pays the bills and is solid, just that after a few years, looking at the same curly brackets, always looking for new parts that might make life a bit more interesting. –  WeNeedAnswers Jan 27 '12 at 22:02
    
Strengths of JavaScript....I just read that. It cracked me up. :) I use it because it is going to become the de facto language of the web. Do I think its any good, heck no. It sort of does functional, it sort of does objects, it sort of does all sorts, but does nothing really well. –  WeNeedAnswers Jan 28 '12 at 22:29
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No, it will not work.

Yes, it may work for YOUR code, but you will deal with a lot of system libraries that are just written in that way, which still makes the whole applicaion not dynamic. You can basically interface with NOTHING in the .NET framework that is static without violating your own harsh requirement:

would it be possible to basically do C# in a completely dynamic way, throwing the static type checker to one side and saying "pah, your so old fashioned!".

This is jsut too hard. If you would way "with my code being fully dynamic" then you may be able to do that, but it is not waht you asked.

Also, as a side note - "dynamic" is not "the old fahioned way". It is just ONE way. Many older langauges are strong typed. Immediately after assembler peopel went pretty much for strong typed langauges. THEN after some time came dynamic. But that means the statement "old fahioned way" is wrong ,too.

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I was poking fun at when saying "old fashioned way" :) you know with trends and all that jazz :) –  WeNeedAnswers Jan 27 '12 at 21:53
    
Big Size 10 on my head with the first line there. Where's the fun in that? Yeah the interfacing would be a problem.....you can pass dynamics around though through method signatures, I grant you the type system won't hold your hand in telling you what the params mean but it is possible....isn't it? ....I think a parameter needs to be put around MY question with regard to the .net environment...I think in the same way that we do with python, where it is built on a static language C. Just take the environment as being C# Static. –  WeNeedAnswers Jan 27 '12 at 22:48
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