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I have two NSArray objects and I want to add the two arrays together in a component wise fashion such that the int in array1 at index i is added to the int in array 2 at index i with the result added to a new array. Is there a faster way to do this than with standard for for (int i=0; i<[array1 count]; i++) type methods? For example, can you use c arrays, fast enumeration, blocks? I am particularly interested because I would like to add x number of arrays containing large number of objects. My current code is as follows:

    NSArray *array1 = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:1],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:2],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:3],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:4],
                   nil];

NSArray *array2 = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:10],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:20],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:30],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:40],
                   nil];

NSMutableArray *resultArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:[array1 count]];

for (int i=0; i<[array1 count]; i++) {
    int result = [[array1 objectAtIndex:i] intValue] + [[array2 objectAtIndex:i] intValue];
    [resultArray addObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:result]];                                
} 

Thanks, I appreciate any comments.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here an example of doing this with blocks and concurrent enumeration:

NSArray *array1 = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:1],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:2],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:3],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:4],
                   nil];

NSArray *array2 = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:10],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:20],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:30],
                   [NSNumber numberWithInt:40],
                   nil];

NSMutableArray *resultArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:[array1 count]];
for (int i=0; i<[array1 count]; i++) {
    [resultArray addObject:[NSNull null]];
}

dispatch_queue_t resultArrayQueue = dispatch_queue_create("com.yourcompany.appname.resultsArrayQueue", DISPATCH_QUEUE_SERIAL);

[array1 enumerateObjectsWithOptions:NSEnumerationConcurrent usingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    int num1 = [(NSNumber *)obj intValue];
    int num2 = [[array2 objectAtIndex:idx] intValue];
    NSNumber *result = [NSNumber numberWithInt:(num1 + num2)];
    dispatch_async(resultArrayQueue, ^{
        [resultArray replaceObjectAtIndex:idx withObject:result];
    });
}];

NSLog(@"Result array: %@", resultArray);

Whether it's faster or not would require profiling to determine. My hunch is that it's not much faster, and may even be slower because of the (relatively small, but still extant) overhead of GCD dispatches. However, for more complex computation than simple addition, this gives you an idea of how to use concurrent enumeration to easily do something with each element in an array in a multicore-aware way.

If you had x number of arrays in a top-level array (as described in your comment), you could replace the -enumerateObjectsWithOptions:usingBlock: call with something like this:

dispatch_queue_t globalQueue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);
dispatch_apply(numberOfItemsInEachArray, globalQueue, ^(size_t idx) {
    NSInteger sum = 0;
    for (NSArray *array in parentArray) {
        sum += [[array objectAtIndex:idx] integerValue];
    }

    NSNumber *result = [NSNumber numberWithInteger:sum];
    dispatch_async(resultArrayQueue, ^{
        [resultArray replaceObjectAtIndex:idx withObject:result];
    });
});

dispatch_apply() is a Grand Central Dispatch function that simply runs a block of code a specified number of times. Since we're telling it to use a global concurrent queue that we got with dispatch_get_global_queue(), it can run different invocations of the block concurrently, providing a (possible) performance benefit on multicore machines. As with most programming problems, there are plenty of other ways to approach this problem. This is just one that came to mind for me.

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I was thinking more though about how I would do this if I had x arrays to sum together say from an array of arrays where x number of arrays can change based on user input. Any thoughts? –  Darren G Jan 27 '12 at 15:41
    
The same basic approach should work. Inside the enumeration block, instead of simply summing a value from array1 with its corresponding value from array2, you'd loop through all the arrays in the top-level parent arrays, grabbing the value for the current index from each array, then sum all those up and put them in the results array. If you need to see code for this, let me know. –  Andrew Madsen Jan 27 '12 at 16:24
    
If you would not mind providing code for this I would really appreciate it. I am just learning how to program and everything is new to me. Thank you –  Darren G Jan 27 '12 at 16:27
    
OK, I added another code snippet. Note that numberOfItemsInEachArray would have to be initialized with the number of items in each child array, and that they'd all have to have the same number of items or you'll get a crash. The code could be modified to deal with arrays of different lengths fairly easily. –  Andrew Madsen Jan 27 '12 at 16:39

You really can't get around having to go over both arrays at least once if you want to sum them up. However, you could look at the array as a matrix. In that context, there are some extremely fast matrix arithmetic algorithms or libraries for you to use.

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