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How can I take the value 123456789012345 or 1234567890123456 and turn it into:

************2345 and ************3456

The difference between the strings above is that one contains 15 digits and the other contains 16.

I have tried the following, but it does not keep the last 4 digits of the 15 digit number and now matter what the length of the string, be it 13, 14, 15, or 16, I want to mask all beginning digits with a *, but keep the last 4. Here is what I have tried:

String.Format("{0}{1}", "************", str.Substring(11, str.Length - 12))
share|improve this question
    
Are you wanting it to mask any number of digits but only show the last four? –  anjunatl Jan 27 '12 at 15:00
    
@anjunatl - Yes, I want to mask all digits expect the last 4 regardless of length. –  Xaisoft Jan 27 '12 at 15:02
    
Can you post the context for that String.Format call? It works fine for me in a test app, so your problem is elsewhere. –  Esoteric Screen Name Jan 27 '12 at 15:03
    
It works, but when i used it on a 15 digit number it only showed the last 3 characters, I want to show all four now matter how long the string. –  Xaisoft Jan 27 '12 at 15:06
    
Added my function, the goal is flexibility. –  anjunatl Jan 27 '12 at 15:14

10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted
using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var str = "1234567890123456";
        if (str.Length > 4)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(
                string.Concat(
                    "".PadLeft(12, '*'), 
                    str.Substring(str.Length - 4)
                )
            );
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine(str);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why did you change from string.Format to string.Concat and in this scenario, it creates a 17 character length string, 13 *'s and the last 4 digits. –  Xaisoft Jan 27 '12 at 15:09
    
I just changed the 13 to 12 in the PadLeft function and that seemed to do the trick. –  Xaisoft Jan 27 '12 at 15:16
2  
new String('*',12) might be easier to read than "".PadLeft(12,'*') –  Bob Vale Jan 27 '12 at 15:22
    
@BobVale - Is there a performance or benefit to using either? –  Xaisoft Jan 27 '12 at 15:39
1  
I think calling PadLeft on an empty string constant looks a little iffy. Why not just str.Substring(str.Length - 4).PadLeft(16, '*') –  Chris Dunaway Jan 27 '12 at 18:06

Easiest way: Create an extension method to extract the last four digits. Use that in your String.Format call.

For example:

public static string LastFour(this string value)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) || value.length < 4)
    {
        return "0000";
    }
    return value.Substring(value.Length - 4, 4) 
}

In your code:

String.Format("{0}{1}", "************", str.LastFour());

In my opinion, this leads to more readable code, and it's reusable.

EDIT: Perhaps not the easiest way, but an alternative way that may produce more maintainable results. <shrug/>

share|improve this answer
1  
Care to explain the downvote? He's clearly dealing with credit card numbers. Reusability is an issue. –  Mike Hofer Jan 27 '12 at 15:06
    
+1 I like your way of thinking –  user915331 Jan 27 '12 at 15:12
    
I like the extension method, but only need it in one place, so a one liner would be nicer. Upvote –  Xaisoft Jan 27 '12 at 15:13
1  
In my experience, you only think you need it in one place. :-) –  Mike Hofer Jan 27 '12 at 18:09

Something like this:

string s = "1234567890123"; // example
string result = s.Substring(s.Length - 4).PadLeft(s.Length, '*');

This will mask all but the last four characters of the string. It assumes that the source string is at least 4 characters long.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

var maskSize = ccDigits.Length - 4;
var mask = new string('*', maskSize) + ccDigits.Substring(maskSize);
share|improve this answer
    
This works, but creates strings that are all 17 characters long. –  Xaisoft Jan 27 '12 at 15:19
    
Really? I seem to get 15 or 16, depending. –  John Feminella Jan 27 '12 at 15:26
    
Against this 13 length value 22222222222221, it returns 17 characters. –  Xaisoft Jan 27 '12 at 15:38

LINQ:

char maskBy = '*'; 
string input = "123456789012345";
int count = input.Length <= 4 ? 0 : input.Length - 4; 
string output = new string(input.Select((c, i) => i < count ? maskBy : c).ToArray()); 
share|improve this answer

Try the following:

    private string MaskString(string s)
    {
        int NUM_ASTERISKS = 4;

        if (s.Length < NUM_ASTERISKS) return s;

        int asterisks = s.Length - NUM_ASTERISKS;
        string result = new string('*', asterisks);
        result += s.Substring(s.Length - NUM_ASTERISKS);
        return result;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This was what I was going for but this is more elegant I think. Nice! –  anjunatl Jan 27 '12 at 15:10

Regex with a match evaluator will do the job

string filterCC(string source) {
  var x=new Regex(@"^\d+(?=\d{4}$)");
  return x.Replace(source,match => new String('*',match.Value.Length));
}

This will match any number of digits followed by 4 digits and the end (it won't include the 4 digits in the replace). The replace function will replace the match with a string of * of equal length.

This has the additional benefit that you could use it as a validation algorthim too. Change the first + to {11,12} to make it match a total of 15 or 16 chars and then you can use x.IsMatch to determine validity.

EDIT

Alternatively if you always want a 16 char result just use

 return x.Replace(source,new String('*',12));
share|improve this answer
static private String MaskInput(String input, int charactersToShowAtEnd)
{
  if (input.Length < charactersToShowAtEnd)
  {
    charactersToShowAtEnd = input.Length;
  }
  String endCharacters = input.Substring(input.Length - charactersToShowAtEnd);
  return String.Format(
    "{0}{1}", 
    "".PadLeft(input.Length - charactersToShowAtEnd, '*'), 
    endCharacters
    );
}

Adjust the function header as required, call with:

MaskInput("yourInputHere", 4);
share|improve this answer

A simple way

   string s = "1234567890123"; // example
   int l = s.Length;
   s = s.Substring(l - 4);
   string r = new string('*', l);
   r = r + s;
share|improve this answer

Try this out:

static string Mask(string str)
{
    if (str.Length <= 4) return str;
    Regex rgx = new Regex(@"(.*?)(\d{4})$");
    string result = String.Empty;
    if (rgx.IsMatch(str))
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < rgx.Matches(str)[0].Groups[1].Length; i++)
            result += "*";
        result += rgx.Matches(str)[0].Groups[2];
        return result;
    }
    return str;
}
share|improve this answer

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