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I'm needing to troubleshoot some old VB6 code and I'm confused about the use of "On Error". In the sample below, if I surround the specific line of code I want to test with the On Error GoTo and the ErrHandler1, is that the ONLY line that's tested. Or will the divide by Zero be included if it's in the same Sub?

On Error GoTo ErrHandler1
If Not Exists(BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE") Then _
   MkDir BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE"

ErrHandler1:
   Call MsgBox(Err.Number & vbCrLf & Err.Description, vbExclamation, App.Title)


intValue1 = 12
intValue2 = 0
intValue3 = intValue1 / intValue

Thanks.

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

The divide by zero will be included and handled, and it will probably create a loop in your sample...

The correct approach is like that

On Error GoTo ErrHandler1
If Not Exists(BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE") Then _
   MkDir BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE"

On Error Goto 0 'this will un-hook you error handler

intValue1 = 12
intValue2 = 0
intValue3 = intValue1 / intValue  'this will be an un-managed error

Exit Sub 'this make sure that msgbox is shown only when the error happens

ErrHandler1:
   Call MsgBox(Err.Number & vbCrLf & Err.Description, vbExclamation, App.Title)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation! – JimDel Jan 27 '12 at 16:47
    
+1. The documentation explains this pretty clearly... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa266173(v=vs.60).aspx – MarkJ Jan 27 '12 at 16:53
3  
Wrong - the division by zero is only handled if the MkDir operation does not thrown an error – Matt Wilko Jan 27 '12 at 16:58
    
@Matt: you are absolutely correct :) – Max Jan 27 '12 at 19:39

The division by zero is only handled if the MkDir does not cause an error to be thrown.

That said it will loop to the ErrHandler1 label and another error will be generated from the divide by zero again which will not be handled because you can't nest error handling within another error handler.

The code therefore does not make sense as it stands, the error handler should be moved further down the code (below an exit sub) to make sure it only gets called once:

On Error Goto ErrHandler1

    'some code

    exit sub
ErrHandler1:
    msgbox "There was an error"

If you want to handle both operations separately you can do this:

On Error GoTo ErrHandler1
If Not Exists(BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE") Then _
   MkDir BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE"

DoCalc:
    On Error GoTo Errhandler2
    intvalue1 = 12
    intvalue2 = 0
    intvalue3 = intvalue1 / intvalue

    Exit Sub

ErrHandler1:
   Call MsgBox("Error making directory - " & Err.Number & vbCrLf & Err.Description, vbExclamation, App.Title)
   Resume DoCalc:

Errhandler2:
    Call MsgBox("Error doing arithmetic - " & Err.Number & vbCrLf & Err.Description, vbExclamation, App.Title)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Matt. It's all starting to make sense now. – JimDel Jan 27 '12 at 17:39

A GoTo error handler it the top of a procedure is good programming style and should be the minimum amount of error handling for most procedures. However it is less flexible than checking for errors after lines of code that could cause an error. When adding error handling in a fairly simple procedure I use the On Error GoTo ... statement and a catch-all error handler at the bottom of the routine.

On Error GoTo procErrorHandler

    If Not Exists(BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE") Then
        MkDir BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE"
    End If

    intvalue1 = 12
    intvalue2 = 0
    intvalue3 = intvalue1 / intvalue

ProcExit:
    Exit Sub

procErrorHandler:
    Call MsgBox("There was an error in the procedure. Error " & CStr(Err.Number) & ", " & Err.Description, vbExclamation, App.Title)
    Resume ProcExit  ' A chance to do any cleanup needed

I am not a fan of multiple GoTo statements because it makes code difficult to read and follow. In a procedure where I am performing several steps and I want to return an error that more accurately describes where the code went wrong, or in a situation where I might have a chance to recover from the error and continue, I disable the catch-all type of error handling and check the Err.Number property after critical steps. If I modify Matt's error handling I would code the procedure this way.

On Error Resume Next

    If Not Exists(BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE") Then
        MkDir BaseDirectory + "\ARCHIVE"
    End If
    ' check for errors making the directory
    If Err.Number <> 0 Then
        Call MsgBox("Error making directory - " & Err.Number & vbCrLf & Err.Description, vbExclamation, App.Title)
    End If

    intvalue1 = 12
    intvalue2 = 0
    intvalue3 = intvalue1 / intvalue
    ' check for errors getting intvalue3
    If Err.Number <> 0 Then
        Call MsgBox("Error doing arithmetic - " & Err.Number & vbCrLf & Err.Description, vbExclamation, App.Title)
    End If

Exit Sub
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