Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have an application that manages employee time sheets.

My tables look like:

TIMESHEET
  TIMESHEET_ID
  EMPLOYEE_ID
  etc

TIMESHEET_DAY:
  TIMESHEETDAY_ID
  TIMESHEET_ID
  DATE_WORKED
  HOURS_WORKED

Each time sheet covers a 14 day period, so there are 14 TIMESHEET_DAY records for each TIMESHEET record. And if someone goes on vacation, they do not need to enter a timesheet if there are no hours worked during that 14 day period.

Now, I need to determine whether or not employees have a 7 day gap in the prior 6 months. This means I have to look for either 7 consecutive TIMESHEET_DAY records with 0 hours, OR a 7 day period with a combination of no records submitted and records submitted with 0 hours worked. I need to know the DATE_WORKED of the last TIMESHEET_DAY record with hours in that case.

The application is asp.net, so I could retrieve all of the TIMESHEET_DAY records and iterate through them, but I think there must be a more efficient way to do this with SQL.

share|improve this question
    
Honestly, I don't even know where to start. – chris Jan 27 '12 at 15:49
    
i would approach this with a LAG function.. if i get some time i might try one out. – Randy Jan 27 '12 at 16:18
    
@Randy: I'm looking at this approach, but don't have much experience with the BI functions, so any suggestions would be appreciated. – chris Jan 27 '12 at 19:19
SELECT t1.EMPLOYEE_ID, t1.TIMESHEETDAY_ID, t1.DATE_WORKED
FROM (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY  EMPLOYEE_ID, TIMESHEETDAY_ID ORDER BY DATE_WORKED) AS RowNumber,
            EMPLOYEE_ID, TIMESHEETDAY_ID, DATE_WORKED
      FROM (SELECT EMPLOYEE_ID, TIMESHEETDAY_ID, DATE_WORKED       
            FROM  TIMESHEET_DAY d
                  INNER JOIN TIMESHEET t ON t.TIMESHEET_ID = d.TIMESHEET_ID
            GROUP BY EMPLOYEE_ID, TIMESHEETDAY_ID, DATE_WORKED
            HAVING SUM(HOURS_WORKED) > 0) t ) t1
     INNER JOIN      
     (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY  EMPLOYEE_ID, TIMESHEETDAY_ID ORDER BY DATE_WORKED) AS RowNumber,
            EMPLOYEE_ID, TIMESHEETDAY_ID, DATE_WORKED
      FROM (SELECT EMPLOYEE_ID, TIMESHEETDAY_ID, DATE_WORKED       
            FROM  TIMESHEET_DAY d
                  INNER JOIN TIMESHEET t ON t.TIMESHEET_ID = d.TIMESHEET_ID
            GROUP BY EMPLOYEE_ID, TIMESHEETDAY_ID, DATE_WORKED
            HAVING SUM(HOURS_WORKED) > 0) t ) t2 ON t1.RowNumber = t2.RowNumber + 1
WHERE t2.DATE_WORKED - t1.DATE_WORKED >= 7 
share|improve this answer
    
DATEDIFF is not an Oracle function – a_horse_with_no_name Jan 27 '12 at 16:13
    
@a_horse_with_no_name fixed, thanks! – Bassam Mehanni Jan 27 '12 at 16:27

I would do it at least partly with SQL by counting the days per timesheet and then do the rest of the logic in the program. This identifies time sheets with missing days:

SELECT * FROM
    (SELECT s.timesheet_id, SUM(CASE WHEN d.hours_worked > 0 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS days_worked
    FROM
        TimeSheet s
        LEFT JOIN TimeSheet_Day d
            ON s.timesheet_id = d.timesheet_id
    GROUP BY
        s.timesheet_id
    HAVING SUM(CASE WHEN d.hours_worked > 0 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) < 14) X
    INNER JOIN TimeSheet
        ON TimeSheet.timesheet_id = X.timesheet_id
    LEFT JOIN TimeSheet_Day
        ON TimeSheet.timesheet_id = TimeSheet_Day.timesheet_id
    ORDER BY
        TimeSheet.employee_id, TimeSheet.timesheet_id, TimeSheet_Day.date_worked
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't really help to identify the gaps, which can occur across two timesheets. – chris Jan 27 '12 at 16:04
    
I updated my SQL. It would at least help identifying possible gaps and return only the problematic records, instead of returning all the records. However, it still requires some program logic in order to detect consecutive missing days. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 27 '12 at 16:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.