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In short: is there some way I can modify a class definition such that it fails to compile at the point of use of a copy constructor no matter where it's used?

I have a very large project and was cleaning up some class definitions. There's a class that I explicitly don't want to use copy constructors on (let's ignore why that is for the sake of this discussion), and in the interest of safety, I figured I'd just define the copy constructor as private and not actually implement it... that way it would throw a compile error if I tried to use it anywhere. Lo and behold, it compiles fine, but I have a linker error... the copy constructor implementation is not found! Presumably that means it's in use somewhere, but I'm unable to find where it's being used. This is Visual Studio 2010 by the way. So my question is, is there some way I can modify the class definition such that it fails to compile at the point of use?

class Sample {
private:
    // not implemented
    Sample( const Sample& rhs );
    Sample& operator=( const Sample& rhs );
public:
    // implemented
    Sample();
...
};

Sample *samp1 = new Sample;
Sample *samp2 = new Sample( *samp1 ); // <<-- inaccessible here!  this works

Presumably since I'm not hitting a compile error, but am hitting the linker error, that it means the class itself (or a friend) is doing the copy-constructed create (since that's all that would have access to the private constructor), but I sure can't find it!

share|improve this question
    
Make the copy constructor private, and do not implement it. Or just disallow it, e.g: X& operator=(const X&) = delete; –  jweyrich Jan 27 '12 at 17:17
2  
@jweyrich: he's already done that. It generates the link error he's seeing. It doesn't show the call point (without a lot of nm work). –  smparkes Jan 27 '12 at 17:19
    
@smparkes: Oh, ignore me. I haven't read the but I'm unable to find where it's being used. Thanks for notifying me. –  jweyrich Jan 27 '12 at 17:22
    
@jweyrich: you should have added the = delete as the (right) answer (at least if you have C++11) rather than modding your comment. Much better than my hack. –  smparkes Jan 27 '12 at 17:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

in C++11 you can change the definition to

class Sample {
private:
    // not implemented
    Sample( const Sample& rhs ) = delete;
    Sample& operator=( const Sample& rhs ) = delete;
public:
    // implemented
    Sample();
...
};

prior to C++11 this is usually done by inheritting from a class that declares a private copy constructor such as boost::NonCopyAble (you can simply copy this class, it's only a few lines). In this case your class (or any friends or children) also cannot access the copy constructor and it will generate a compile-time error.

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Boy, there's a lot new in C++11. –  smparkes Jan 27 '12 at 17:22
    
    
VC++ 2010 does not support deleted members. –  ildjarn Jan 27 '12 at 17:24
    
love this, but yeah, not in VS2010... perhaps i'll look into GNU support of it... –  mark Jan 27 '12 at 17:33
2  
@mark: the second part of my answer provided an alternative because I know many people cannot use C++11 ;). It's actually the same as Michael Burr's answer. –  KillianDS Jan 27 '12 at 17:43

Inherit from a noncopyable class:

class noncopyable
{
private:
    // not implemented
    noncopyable( const noncopyable& rhs );
    noncopyable& operator=( const noncopyable& rhs );
};


class Sample : private noncopyable {
private:
    // not implemented

    Sample( const Sample& rhs );
    Sample& operator=( const Sample& rhs );
public:
    // implemented
    Sample();

    // ...
};

Sample *samp1 = new Sample;
Sample *samp2 = new Sample( *samp1 ); // <<-- compile-time error

This works fine even if you don't have C++11 (where the delete method mentioned elsewhere is probably preferable).

share|improve this answer
    
Just note that this has the side effect of changing the layout of the class. Generally doesn't matter, but ... –  smparkes Jan 27 '12 at 17:32
    
Aren't Sample's copy constructor and copy-assignment operator unnecessary? I.e., isn't deriving from noncopyable sufficient? –  ildjarn Jan 27 '12 at 17:33
    
interesting... yes this actually does produce a compile error at the place of use! –  mark Jan 27 '12 at 17:39
1  
@ildjam: not if you want a diagnostic that points right to the line causing the problem. If you leave out the private declarations in Sample you still get a compiler error, but the error points to the class (saying that the default copy ctor can't work) instead of pointing to the line that's causing the copy. At least that's the behavior I see with GCC 4.6.1 and MSVC 16. –  Michael Burr Jan 27 '12 at 17:42
    
re: Sample's copy and assignment declarations not being necessary, I think you're right, but the compiler threw out a TON of additional errors regarding compiler generated functions... was cleaner with them in. –  mark Jan 27 '12 at 17:42

What is error that linker generate? If it is LNK2019 it should be easy to track down function that uses copy constructor:

MSDN says that its format is:

unresolved external symbol 'symbol' referenced in function 'function'

If look this error message, you can find method that calls undefined copy constructor.

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it is LNK2019, although the names were so mangled the "referenced in" part was WAY scrolled off to the right... so that did give me enough information to actually solve my problem. –  mark Jan 27 '12 at 17:36
    
I'm glad that I helped. –  Nemanja Boric Jan 27 '12 at 17:38
    
thank you! although your response actually got me to the core of my problem first, I felt it best to accept the C++11 delete + noncopyable response as the appropriate response to my exact question. –  mark Jan 27 '12 at 17:58
    
I completly agree with you! –  Nemanja Boric Jan 27 '12 at 18:01

Are you trying to get module+line number during compilation? Try making copy-constructor templated:

class A
{
  public:
  template< typename T >
  A( A const & )
  {
  }

  A()
  {
  }
};

int main( void )
{
 A a;
 A b( a ); // main.cpp(43) : error C2558: class 'A' : no copy constructor available or copy constructor is declared 'explicit'

 return ( 0 );
}
share|improve this answer

If the member is private then you should already get an error at the place of use if it doesn't have permission to access private members.

To get the same error in functions that do have private access you have to put the private copy-ctor declaration somewhere they don't have access to, like as a private member of a base class.

VS2010 doesn't support it yet, but declaring a function as deleted will also work.

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As I recall, if you declare it inline, sometimes you'll get a compiler error that says it was declared inline but never defined. That was a while ago, and with gcc. YMMV.

[Shown not to work; leaving this for posterity.]

share|improve this answer
    
If you're using C++11, the other answer is much better. If you don't, this is the best I know. –  smparkes Jan 27 '12 at 17:26
    
interesting idea, tried it, but it didn't produce a compile-time error. –  mark Jan 27 '12 at 17:34
    
Good to know. I'll leave the answer so other people don't try it. –  smparkes Jan 27 '12 at 17:36

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