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An example of my issue is a sports game. A sports game has two teams, a home team and an away team. My active record models are as follows:

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base

  belongs_to :game

end

class Game < ActiveRecord::Base

  has_one :home_team, :class_name => "Team"
  has_one :away_team, :class_name => "Team"

end

I want to be able to access a team through the game, for example: Game.find(1).home_team

But I am getting an unitialized constant error: Game::team. Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong? Thanks,

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If Team ... belongs_to :game, a team can only ever play one game. You probably want has_many :games –  jlundqvist Jan 27 '12 at 18:46

4 Answers 4

Sounds like a namespacing problem. Try explicitly declaring the class (with namespace) for team. E.g.:

has_one :home_team, :class_name => "::Team"

http://guides.rubyonrails.org/association_basics.html#the-has_one-association

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I just tested your code and it should work.

What I suspect is that your file name is wrong. Make sure that your filenames in app/models/ are:

  • game.rb
  • team.rb

and not:

  • games.rb

    or

  • teams.rb
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I think that it may be a mistake of your architecture.

Game can't distinguish two Team with this architecture.

So, please run like that

rails g migration add_stadium_to_game stadium:integer
rails g migration add_home_to_team home:integer
rake db:migrate

and, edit "game.rb" like that

class Game < ActiveRecord::Base

  has_many :teams

  def home_team
    teams.select { |team| team.home == self.stadium }.first
  end

  def away_team
    teams.select { |team| team.home != self.stadium }.first
  end

end

Of cource this is one example, so there are many ways to realize your purpose.

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If Game has_one :team then Rails assumes your teams table has a game_id column. What you want though is for the games table to have a team_id column, in which case you'd use Game belongs_to :team. As English it does sound backwards in this case, but as Ruby, it's correct.

I did simplify a little. You'd want something like:

class Team < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :home_games, :class_name => "Game", :foreign_key => 'home_team_id'
  has_many :away_games, :class_name => "Game", :foreign_key => 'away_team_id'
end

class Game < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :home_team, :class_name => "Team"
  belongs_to :away_team, :class_name => "Team"
end
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