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I need some assistance in Qt on Windows 7. It seems that Qt readyRead() signal is emited by an asynchronus procedure call which causes the code to be executed concurrent but in the same thread.

In my example I have a queue which should be accessed by DoRead() and in DoTimer() which is accessed by a lock. Entire operation is running in ui (main) thread. However sometimes as DoRead() is called a dead lock occurred. The code stops execution in DoRead(). The dead lock is reproduceable if the Message Box is showed and so execution of DoTimer() is halted. However I was surprised to see that OnRead() is still called in concurrent. The only explanation for me is, that OnRead() is called by an Windows APC.

See MSDN article Asynchronus Procedure Calls:

An asynchronous procedure call (APC) is a function that executes asynchronously in the context of a particular thread. When an APC is queued to a thread, the system issues a software interrupt. The next time the thread is scheduled, it will run the APC function.

Am I true with my assumption that readyRead() could be an APC?

In either case, what could I do to prevent dead locks? I need to access the queue in DoRead() to fill the queue and in DoTimer() (and other methods of course) to read, write or delete entries from same queue. Recursive mutexes are no solution since both calls occurs in same thread.

class QMySocket : public QTcpSocket {
public:
    QMySocket() {
        ...
        connect(this, SIGNAL(readyRead()), this, SLOT(DoRead()));
        connect(_MyTimer, SIGNAL(timeout()), this, SLOT(DoTimer()));
        ...
    }
private:
    QTimer* _MyTimer;
    QQueue<int> _MyQueue;
    QMutex _Lock;

    void DoRead() {
        _Lock.lock(); // <-- Dead Lock here (same Thread ID as in DoTimer)
        _MyQueue... // Do some queue operation
        // DoSomething
        _Lock.unlock();
    }

    void DoTimer() {
        _Lock.lock();
        QQueue<int>::iterator i = _MyQueue.begin();
        while (i != _MyQueue.end()) { // Begin queue operation
            if (Condition) {
                QMessageBox::critical(...);
                i = _MyQueue.erase(i);
            } else {
                i++;
            }
        } // end queue operation
        _Lock.unlock();
    }
};

Edit 2: This had nothing to do with APC as I found out. The problem was only the extra message loop created by QMessageBox.

Instead calling QMessageBox directly, all messages will be queued and showed after any queue operation.

void DoTimer() {
    QList<QString> Messages;
    QQueue<int>::iterator i = _MyQueue.begin();
    while (i != _MyQueue.end()) { // Begin queue operation
        if (Condition) {
            Messages.append(...);
            i = _MyQueue.erase(i);
        } else {
            i++;
        }
    } // end queue operation
    QMessageBox::critical(Messages);
}

Locks are not required if there is no concurrent access to the queue (no multithreading).

share|improve this question
    
you said you have 1 thread; by deadlock, do you mean that the app freezes? I'm assuming you mean you are already passed a lock() statement and you get 'interrupted' and jump to DoRead() which requires and unlock() call first, so you're stuck (in this example) on the lock() in DoRead(). Am I correct in my interpretation? –  Adrian Jan 27 '12 at 17:43
1  
readyRead() is just a signal which is sent asynchronously; whenever it is sent it executes DoRead() –  Adrian Jan 27 '12 at 17:53
1  
I don't understand why would you use mutex here, since everything is executed in one thread anyways. You could just emit a signal within the class readDone for example and connect it to DoTimer or call the DoTimer directly at the end of DoRead –  Neox Jan 27 '12 at 18:14
    
Sorry, didn't think this through. In your case I would process the queue in the DoRead function. –  Neox Jan 27 '12 at 18:26
    
@Adrian: Exactly, the application freezes because lock was already entered in DoTimer(). readyRead() seems to be asynchronously even in single threaded app (looks like APC call). The problem now is, how to protect the queue against concurrent access? Locks are exactly designed for concurrent access, but in this case this is no solution because we don't really have concurrent access, it is still one thread. But DoTimer will never get processor time again as soon as DoRead is waiting for the lock, so the lock can never be released and DoRead will wait for ever. –  bkausbk Jan 27 '12 at 19:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your only problem is the call to

QMessageBox::critical(...);

This call blocks until you press a button. But since you called it while still holding the lock, your DoRead deadlocks.

There is absolutely no reason to open a messagebox while holding that lock!

If you still want your DoTimer to respond while showing the messagebox don't use the static convenience methods like QMessagebox::critical.

Better do this

   // Somewhere in the constructor ...
   QMessageBox* msgBox = new QMessageBox( this );
   msgBox->setAttribute( QWidget::WA_DeleteOnClose );
   msgBox->setStandardButtons( QMessageBox::Ok );
   msgBox->setWindowTitle( tr("Error") );
   msgBox->setModal( true );
   //...

void DoTimer() {
    _Lock.lock();
    // DoSomething
    _MyQueue... // Iterate over queue, and do some queue operation (delete entires for exmaple)
    _Lock.unlock();
    msgBox->setText( tr("DingDong!") );
    if (!msgBox->isVisible())
        msgBox->open( this, SLOT(msgBoxClosed(QAbstractButton*)) );
}

void MyWidget::msgBoxClosed(QAbstractButton*) {
   qDebug("Byebye msgbox");
}

But still, from your code I don't see any reason to use mutexes anyway. There is no concurrency, right?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes thank you for that hints. As I also found out by my self yesterday, calling the message box is the problem. I used locks because originally I planed to use several threads. Calling the messagebox was only exemplary. In my real code it was even worser because within this locked section I emited a Qt signal. I could never control if some one connected with that signal could enter an alertable wait state (which at least causes that dead lock on Windows Platform). But the solution here is not to emit anything while holding the lock or while doing some queue operation with iterators in a loop. –  bkausbk Jan 28 '12 at 11:15

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