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This is my code in ASP.Net C#

ArrayList myArrayList = new ArrayList();
            myArrayList.Add("Apple");
            myArrayList.Add("Banana");

            if (myArrayList.Contains("apple"))  // This returns false because Contains doesn't support a case-sensitive search
                statusLabel.Text = "ArrayList contains apple";

I get false , Since Apple not equals apple. I have even tried like

myArrayList.Contains("apple", StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase)

But intellisense shows error. Is this really possible on ArrayList ?apple

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ArrayList.contains take only one parametr. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Ravi Gadag Jan 27 '12 at 17:35
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are using .NET 1.1 because Generics aren't available, you could do something like this:

bool contains = false;
for (int i = 0; i < myArrayList.Count && !contains; i++)
{
    contains = ((string)myArrayList[i]).ToUpper() == "APPLE";
}
if (contains)
{
    statusLabel.Text = "ArrayList contains apple";
}

Otherwise, using List<string> instead of ArrayList, then myArrayList.Contains("apple", StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase) will work.

If you have .NET 2 + Generics available to you; then there really is no good reason to be using the ArrayList anymore.

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1  
You should use the .ToUpper() method because of this CA1308: Normalize strings to uppercase –  woni Jan 27 '12 at 17:49
    
@woni: Excellent point. Fixed. –  vcsjones Jan 27 '12 at 17:50
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You should use List<string> instead of ArrayList.
Your code will then work as-is.

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Almost down-voted, but realised that I need to add using System.Linq; to get this working. Just sayin'... for future googlers. –  trailmax Aug 12 '13 at 11:28
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personally I'd prefer to use this function rather than lowering the whole string..

public static class StringExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Allows case insensitive checks
    /// </summary>
    public static bool Contains(this string source, string toCheck, StringComparison comp)
    {
        return source.IndexOf(toCheck, comp) >= 0;
    }
}

EDIT: usage of the code..

ArrayList myArrayList = new ArrayList();
            myArrayList.Add("Apple");
            myArrayList.Add("Banana");

foreach(var item in myArrayList)
{
    if(StringExtensions.Contains(statusLabel.Text, item.ToString(), StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)
    {
       //true.. do whatever you want in here...
       statusLabel.Text = "ArrayList contains " + item.ToString();
    }

}
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Is that a response to my answer? This code only compares strings, it doesn't explain how to look in a collection in a case-insensitive way. –  vcsjones Jan 27 '12 at 18:08
    
nope its not. I usually use this function to do case-insensitive checks for strings. instead of using regex or the useless String.Contain() function. so all he needs to replace the Contain function with this one and everything will work flawlessly... –  Robin Van Persi Jan 27 '12 at 18:21
    
Your code is an extension method on string. There are three problems with this. 1) If OP is using .NET 1.1; this is not possible. 2) An array list is not strongly typed, so it's an object. Since you're extending string, not object, the extension method will be unavailable. 3) It checks IndexOf, so "apple" will match if one of the items contains "applebees" even though the strings aren't the same. We are trying to see if a collection contains a string, not a string inside another string. –  vcsjones Jan 27 '12 at 18:25
    
check the updated answer... –  Robin Van Persi Jan 27 '12 at 18:42
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