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I'm trying to wrap my head around Javascript's function.apply(). You use it like this: f.apply(obj,args)

to run function f with the given arguments args, with the function's internal usage of this mapped onto the object obj.

Here's a simple example to show how that all works to get us up-to-speed:

var o = { 
  state : 0, 
  plus : function(){
    this.state += 1;
  }
}
//o is an object with a state-tracking var and a function that will operate on it
o.state
// 0
o.plus()
o.state
// 1
newO = {state:3}
// newO  is similar to the original object, but doesn't have that state-manipulating function
newO.state
// 3
o.plus.apply(newO,[])  // call o's function, but hijack the 'this' reference to point to newO
newO.state
// 4

Cool. So I've written a function to solve a null pointer issue in javascript with a particular jquery plugin. If a jQuery set is empty, it just doesn't run a function:

var applyIfPresent = function(jqObj,func,args){
  //only works if jquery has the func you supply
  if(jqObj.length){
    jqObj[func].apply(jqObj,args);
  }
}

I've run the simple test: applyIfPresent($("input"),"css",["background","blue"]); To see if it'll generalize to a jQuery set of multiple elements. It seems to work fine, but I have no idea how the internals of jQuery and the usage of this translates to that schema. I love that it seems to work like magic, but honestly?--I've learned to be a little afraid of magic.

How does f.apply or jQuery figure all that out to make it work?

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1  
The source for jQuery is available. I'm not quite sure what the question is, as it (Function.apply) is just "standard" JavaScript... –  user166390 Jan 27 '12 at 18:39
    
You seem to know how apply works, and you seem to know how to use jQuery's API. I guess it's not clear what actually is confusing you. Your applyIfPresent() function there would work on any object with a length property, jQuery or not. –  Alex Wayne Jan 27 '12 at 18:45
1  
Are you aware that if length is zero, jQuery methods are a no-op? I.e. applyIfPresent($("input"), "css", ["background", "blue"]) does the EXACT SAME THING as $("input").css("background", "blue"). –  Domenic Jan 27 '12 at 18:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

it's not that magic, you seem to understand it perfectly by the example above.
when you do

jqObj[func].apply(jqObj,args);

it's basically the same as doing

$(jqObj).func(args);
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.apply() isn't a JQuery feature, it's a core JavaScript language feature. You likely won't find anything useful in the JQuery source in regards to this since they didn't invent the wheel here.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/apply

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